23rd Georgia Infantry

Soldiers History of the 23rd Georgia, in thier words

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Below is the history of the 23rd Georgia through the eyes of several of the men who lived it, all in chronalogical order by dates, through excerpts from diaries, letters, memiors, pensions and other sources. The grammer and puntuation in these documents is kept in its original form

July 1861
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July 22nd 1861 WLF diary Co. K
I having previously joined a volunteer company went to Blairsville and helped organize the Company and elect our officers after which time we stood in readiness to march to camps at a day’s notice

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August 1861
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
When Georgia seceded James H. Huggins recently a returned Californian and myself proceeded to raise a company. The country was a unit for war and soon we had a company of 100 men rank and file. They were a fine body of men, few of whom over 21 years of age, the very pictures of health and dressed in their brown jeans pants and round abouts, drawn up in line they presented a splendid appearance. This Company was called the Blue Ridge Volunteers, the first to leave the county and was officered as follows, J.H. Huggins, Capt., John Reece 1st Lt., H.W. Barclay 2nd Lt. and Jesse P. King, 3rd Lt.
The outside world was a revelation to them, and when well drilled and half starved, as many times they were, in after years they were fighters of the first quality. The travelled experience of our Captain was a great help towards securing his election, for as globe trotters, none of us were distinguished. The whole county, it seemed to me were in Blairsville the day appointed for our assembling and departure. We had a big dinner, speeches were made, flag presented, a general mingling and commingling of the crowd and the whole scene presented the appearance of a grand jollification. There was laughter and joking and pranks, some tears perhaps, but nothing to mar our pleasure, or indicative of the hard times before us, soon we were on the march to Big Shanty.
The farmers proposed to haul us, but we were too patriotic for that and accepting one wagon to carry our baggage, we footed it all the way, ninety miles.
Along the road we were cheered, flags and handkerchiefs waved, and we lived on the fat of the land. It seemed to me that the people were crazy and we were wild crazy
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August 1861 War Record of Samuel Tate Hammontree Co. E
Volunteered in 1861 at Jasper Ga., Under Capt. Sam Tate. Marched on foot to Big Shanty camping along the road at night laying on ground.
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August 22nd 1861 WLF diary Co. K
The Co. marched for camp McDonald, Ga. but I rode to town, saw them leave, then returned home
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August 31st 1861 WLF diary Co. K
The Company was mustered into service for the war into the 23rd Georgia Regt. by Capt Wm Bacon, A.Q.M., of the C.S.A.
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War time picture of Big Shanty or Camp McDonald

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Lacy Hotel, marked as Big Shanty Hotel on map of Camp McDonald below

click to enlarge
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Layout of Camp McDonald Ga. or "Big Shanty", Camp of Instruction in Cobb County Ga.

Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
Arriving at Big Shanty we found quite a number of companies from other counties, and nine of these with the Blue Ridge Volunteers formed the 23rd Georgia regiment.
Hutchinson was elected Colonel, W.P. Barclay Lt. Col. and E.M. Best Major. Here for some weeks we drilled and became accustomed to the duties of camp life. Here we had the Old United States ration, which was good enough for anybody, besides pies, cakes, fruits and so on, brought in by the ladies and other visitors. We wasted enough at Big Shanty in one week to have lasted us very well two weeks the latter part of the war. We were anxious to get to the seat of war and soon orders came to report to Richmond. Soldiers are ever restless when still, and especially was this the case with the most of us who had never been anywhere.
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September 1861
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September 1861 War Record of Samuel Tate Hammontree Co. E
I had measles at Big Shanty and our medicine was plenty of Rye Whiskey
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October 1861
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October 3rd 1861 TPF letter Co. E
We have some three cases of measles in our company and several in the Regiment no other sickness of consequence. We have no notice as to the time we will be ordered we will be ordered away from here I think we will remain here perhaps three or four weeks longer we have as yet received no arms

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November 1861
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November 1861 War Record of Samuel Tate Hammontree Co. E
Drilled at Big Shanty three months under Col. Best and Tom Hutcherson
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November 11th 1861 WLF diary Co. K
The 23rd taken the cars for the seat of war
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
We left on different trains, myself with the first section and we thought with provisions enough to last us through, but upon arriving at Raleigh, N. Carolina, we found ourselves out of bread. It became necessary for the Quater Master to go out in town to get some and soon he returned with a wagon load of bakers bread, when you never heard such a fussing or cursing. They called it dammed old hornet nest bread and swore they would not eat it. Many times before the war closed, we laughed about the revolt of the biscuit and batter cake eaters.

November 1861 War Record of Samuel Tate Hammontree Co. E
From Big Shanty was sent to Augusta and then to Richmond Va.
I still remember the big dinner we had at Athens before leaving for Richmond
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November 13th 1861 TPF letter Co. K
Bud is well and the rest of the company. Well Polly we now have our provision boxed up our clothes packed and ready to march to the Rail Road to take the train for Richmond. And we’re these lines reaches you we will be getting on towards Richmond, The boys are all very anxious to get off and I hope we may have good weather, as the appearances are favorable at this time and I am really anxious to get off myself as we are doing no good here, And we will get Arms in Richmond and then I am ready to try the enemy of our country if necessary and though I and many others good and faithful soldiers may fall by their hands I think that through the interposition of Providence we will have success
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November 14th 1861 WLF diary Co. K
We landed in Richmond Va. taken up to camp and drilled regular
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
Reaching Richmond, we were marched out to the old fair grounds and here we went into camps, and here details were made from the regiment daily for quite a while to guard the Yankee prisoners at the old Libby captured at the first Manassas. This was the first service rendered the Confederacy by our regiment.
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November 30th 1861 WLF diary Co. K
We moved to Bloody Run, now called Chimbarazo Hospital
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Chimborazo Hospital, located at Bloody Run where the 23rd was first stationed, before the hospital

December 1861
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
After a little while we were ordered to Yorktown, and boarding the North Hampton, went down the river to Highland, where Cleveland subsequently killed ducks, and where we disembarked. From here to Yorktown it was twelve miles, which we made by twelve o' clock and on this day died Lee Morris, the first death in our Company.
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December 10th 1861 WLF D Co. K
We got on board a steamboat (The North Hampton) and sailed down James River to Kings Warf
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December 14th 1861 WLF diary Co. K
Marched to Yorktown and Camped
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December 14th 1861 DSAG letter Yorktown, Va.
we are 130 miles from Rich, we come down on the boat and then we march 15 miles and I tell you it was hard work we can see the Yankees vessel from hear and I expect we will move to day near the _____ will hour Arms to day I Hope, we left several of hour boys at Rich with the mumps
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I saw the Yankees you cant tell them from our people
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We are under General Magruder
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
At Yorktown the Companies were posted at different points about the place and never were together again until the retreat began. Our Company was sent to Fort MaGruder, where we were in charge of some light artillery.
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December 16th 1861 Felix W. Isreal letter Co. K Yorktown letter was dated from the mention of when their arms were supplied which was Dec 16th according to Field & Staff Record of Events
We are now stationed near at Yorktown but don’t know how long we will stay here. We have drawn our arms this morning
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We came to Richmond the 15th of November and stayed there till the 10th of this instant. Our business then was to guard yankee prisoners. I have conversed with a heap of them. Some of them was very savey and some were very humble I have conversed with a heap of them. Some of them was very savey and some were very humble. I saw Ely the yankee Congress member that was taken in the Mannasas fight and talked to him. He is smart. I was Corporal of the Guard at the yankee hospital 24 hours and saw and talked to all of them in there. With their legs shot off and shot in the face and some in almost every way that looks like men could be to live and yet some of them say if they was out they out they would fight us again. Richmond is a fine city six miles long. I have seen Jeff Davis and Steven and old John Tyler and A. Pryer and lots of other Big men.
I now say of our place we are stationed between York River and James River right on the York, but is only 12 miles across to the James River and in sight of the Chesapeake Bay and 14 miles to the Bethel Church and 10 miles to Hampton Bight in a small neck of land, you see and in sight of the Enemy. I saw them that their ships not 10 minutes ago and we are expecting here easy day, so say our General Magruder. This is a strong fortified place.
There is about 2 hundred cannon mounted here at this place that is about here and we have 20 thousand troops here about this place. We are in 2 hundred yards of the verry spot where Cornwallis gave his sword to G. W. Washington. There is a monument that stands on the ground.
Give my Best Wishes to all my Friends.
Your truly
F. W. Isreal
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December 1861 Field & Staff Record of Events Yorktown, Va.
... The Regiment is drilled in School of the Soldier, School of the Company and Battalion drill unit the 16th of Dec last have been entirely without Arms; since the 16th the Regt has been furnished with the musket but in consequence of sickness and details daily made up the men have had no opportunity to learn the manual well.
... The Companies are supplied with Camp equipage and accoutrements necessary for their use except axes and a few articles of like character
A large number of the men in the Regt are unable for duty in consequence of severe sickness.
... The sick are destitute of Hospitals and it is impossible to take proper care of them in tents.
... By order of General Winder the Regt marched from the Old Fair Grounds Richmond, Va. on the 4th to Chimborazo Heights; was engaged in guarding Federal Prisoners until 10th By order of Secretary of War, marched to Yorktown Va. and reported for duty to Maj Genl Magruder; Reported 13th since, four companies A,B,C,& F by order of Maj Genl Magruder were detached from the Regt and ordered to report to Maj Goode for Artillery duty. The remaining six companies have been engaged in serving under different details for duty.
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November & December 1861 Co. B Record of Events Yorktown, Va.
The company having been detached on 16 days of Dec 61 and employed in light and flying artillery service for sixteen days, accounts for the double pay roll, there being 1 month and 15 days at $11.00 pre month and 16 days at $12.00 per month
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To Dec 31, 1861 Co. C Record of Events Yorktown, Va.
On 12-4-61 moved from the Old Fair Grounds at Richmond, Va. to Chimborazo Hill, On the 10th Dec from Chimborazo Hill to Yorktown by way of James River. Reached Yorktown on the 12th and on the 17th was detached from the 23rd Ga Regt for Artillery service and have been in Art'y service since that time
Cmd'd by Maj J Tms Goode
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November & December 1861 Co. E Record of Events Yorktown, Va.
The Company left Chimborazo Hill with Regt. Dec 10, 61 for Yorktown by way of James River, on Steamer North Hampton to Kings Landing, marched from there to Yorktown a distance of some 15 miles. Arrived at Yorktown Dec 12, 61.
Dec 18, 61 moved from Camp near Yorktown to Camp near Hosp. above wharf where they are now stationed.

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January 1862
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January 1862 DSAG letter Yorktown, Va. Co. C
I this evening seat my self to write you a few lines to let you no that I am well with the exception of the mumps they haven’t heart me yet my jaw is swell up I weigh 150 lbs I want you all to write to me often Mother I aim to send my Leams Coat home by Feard
Mr Patmon & F A Mayes & J B Lane have all got discharges
your truly
DSA Griffeth
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January 1862 DSAG letter Yorktown, Va. Co. C
I had to haul House Logs Sunday and Monday I had to go to get Board timber and the ground was covered with Sleet
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we was expecting a fight hear ever day I expect we will have one hear but it may be a long time first and then again it may be soon, the cannon heir firing now down on the beach but it is a long ways off
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January 23rd 1862 DSAG letter Yorktown, Va. Co. C
Coal I was in the hospital have been sick every since. Feard left in fact but I was sick a day or too before he left, A J Yeargin died the 20th he died in the hospital about 2 weeks, he had the Pneumonia in ______ ___,the health of the Company is good as could be expected we have got hour winter quarters Completed it looks sorta like living
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we haven’t drawed yet, but we will draw soon I think we need it bad enough, for money is scarce in this Company, J B Fowler is sick
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for we have got nothing good to eat, we drawed a little syrup yesterday
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me and Mr Bray air going to write together as Feard has gone home
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January 29th 1862 DSAG letter Yorktown, Va. Co. C
the health of the Com is tolerably good their is not much chance for a fight hear soon the excitement is not as high as it has been, I wrote to you to have me a Hat like Feard made was though you can have me a soft wool hat made like E W Patmon’s, I think I can ware a soft wool hat it will cost $2.00 and will last longer than a fur hat that cost $5.00 and I have concluded to try a wool hat,
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we have got it in hour houses it seems like livings now
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we are all fat now, we Drawed some pork the last draw day
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January 31st 1862 MC letter Yorktown, Va. Co. D
this is a hard old plase shore But I think wee can stand it wee have had a few vary Nice days I don’t think we will Ever have a fight hear
There is Yankee Boats in site some times But it will never come I don’t think
Col Hutcherson is gone home now the Boys don’t like him much I don’t think he not pay me anything for them This early he said it was not legal & I wont pay him that $100 dollars, everybody else is on my side they say not pay for it was his neglect we hasn’t fetched yet But I think we will to day
Our company is attached to artillery rite on the Bank of the River
we have five Cannons to work, said to be the best on the plase we can hear the cannons roar everyday
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An Example of Confederate Winter Quarters

January 31st 1862 WLF diary Co. K
Went into Winter quarters that we had built ourselves of pine logs we had snug cabins with brick chimney
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January 1862 Field & Staff Record of Events
The Regiment for the last month has suffered seriously from sickness is now improved in health.
.. The discipline is good, but it’s efficiency as a Regimental Corps is and continues to be impaired by the detailing of five companies to serve as Artillery
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W P Barclay
Lt. Col Comdg 23 Regt. Geo. Vols.
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February 1862
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February 1862 DSAG letter Yorktown, Va. Co. C
Lieu Mayes is a going to start home in the morning I though I would write you a few lines to as it would not cost any thing, I will send you some money by him
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I am on guard to night, I am a guarding hour wood, I took 3 prisoners but I am sorry to say they are Georgians, they was trying to steal hour wood
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February 10th 1862 MC letter Yorktown, Va. Co. D
We are expecting a fight soon in a day or too and it may be so, for what I know
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for they had commenced to furlough to day, but heard of that fight and stopped them, but they will commence again in short time if wee don’t fight
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I have reported Dick to Captain and he is going to tell him he had better pay the money back than to go to trial for it will ruin him I don’t care if it dose keep this to your self till you hear what is done with him.
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there is rite smart of sickness hear now But no body dangerous I don’t think this is a bad place it ain’t like Camp McDonald was
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the cannons is roaring all round
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February 11th 1862 WLF diary Co. D
We were assigned to a Battery
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February 18th 1862 MC letter Yorktown, Va. Co. D
Boswell is sick & is very bad off, but I think he is better he has got the Typhoid fever
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we are expecting a fight hear at this plase & I think it will take a heap to whip us though they may do so for I what I know
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January & February 1862 Co. E Record of Events Yorktown, Va.
The Company with Regt. moved from Camp near Hosp. to Winter Quarters 1/2 mile west of Yorktown Jan 23, 62 In Consequence of sickness and Heavy details the Co. has had but little time for inaction
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March 1862
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May 1862 From Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia in the words of the 23rds Officers, Colonel James H Huggins & Major William Barclay
when it was ordered to Richmond but a very short time, it was ordered to Yorktown, where it remained until the evacuation of that place, which event occurred on the 3rd day of May, 1862. During this eventful siege the regiment was commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Barclay. While at this point it was assigned to the brigade of General Rains, in the division of Major General D.H. Hill.
After the retreat commenced, the regiment was on the field of the Battle of Williamsburg, but were not in the engagement. The hardships, privations and sufferings endured during this tedious retreat, were very severe, and in the opinion of many, only excelled by the disastrous retreat of Napoleon Bonaparte from Moscow. Certain it is, that no march or retreat during this war, can bear any comparison to it. The Twenty Third suffered very severely, many men died from the sufferings and exposure they underwent; and when we reached Richmond or it’s vicinity, not more then one half the men and officers reported for duty.
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
Gen. Johnston came down with his great army from Northern Virginia and taking in the situation did not like it and the retreat began, McClellan close behind.
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March 3rd 1862 MC letter Yorktown, Va. Co. D
we are still looking for a fight hear every day and I think we will fight in a short time
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I have been looking for a letter from you for a week, but has got none yet I don’t know what is the matter if Mr Edwards ain’t on the road with one to me, but he may come before I start this
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Boswell is getting well very fast now
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Wiley Moss is sick & is vary bad off I think Vurnin Collins had the mumps, but is getting well
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I thought I would not rite till I got one from you Mr Edwards hasn’t got hear yet, but we are looking for him all the time
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we all think that Willy Moss will die & Williams will die too, I think, but Erly is sick, but he is better
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March 7th 1862 MC letter Yorktown, Va. Co. D
they had a fight yesterday down Below us they sunk one of the Yankee Boats and killed five hundred of them and I think they are fighting down there now for we hear the guns all the time there a good many gone from hear, doom there I think we will have some fighting now for the time a year has come there is some thing going to be done now
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making I understand Leut. Steel is going to start home in the Morning if he dose I will send this by him
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I am looking every day for one Mr Edwards hasn’t come yet we are uneasy about him for we are afraid he has happened to some bad accident
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Boswell is getting about again he will be will in a short time
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March 7th 1862 WLF diary Co. k
Navy fight at Newport News, the federals defeated, 3 Yankee Gun Boats sunk
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March 8th 1862 DSAG letter Co. C
their fifteen of Old Abs Vessels in sight to day but they air at least 10 miles off
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March 9th 1862 DSAG letter Yorktown, Va. Co. C
the health of this Co. is very good, my mess air all fat
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their is not much prospect of a fight hear soon though their is no telling they have been moving troops from hear, Cobs Regt & Cobs Legion + 5th N.C. Regt has all been moved from hear last week they all went to Suffork it is below Norfork I suppose G Kinny is a going back I guess it will go hard with him take a privates place, WL Selman sends respects to you all
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there’s a heavy Cannonading down the river now they sent hour Regt. from hear down there this morning and to Cavalry Companies and one Artillery Company composed of six peaces it any for that they air fight in now we had a alarm hear last Tuesday night at 1 O’clock and we were drawed up within the line of battle and Staid their until 4 O’clock when we left, order not to strip for they did not, but we would have to go back at day light but the Yanks did not come
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the health of the Com is very good, A Eale (Asphosio Earle ?) says you must come over some Saturday night and we will have fish for breakfast
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A Eale was sick for a few days when they first got hear but he has got well, I Burney was sick too but he has got well now, I tried to swap horses with Jude Thomas but he would not swap I offered him fifteen Dollars to boot, he would not swap for that
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March 13th 1862 MC letter Yorktown, Va. Co. D
Mr Edwards got hear day before yesterday he fetched me one that I was mighty glad
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Mr Edwards did not get his clothing hear with him he left them & don’t know when they will come we are in a grate stir hear now for our Regt is gone down to Bethel they went down there this morning we think that they will have a fight down there to day or to morrow But we don’t now what they will do
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Boswell is getting well
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I am Glad you ant like G W Wilkes wife cant pay the postage on sow many letters
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March 23rd 1862 MC letter Yorktown, Va. Co. D
Bill Steel is dead he died night before last he was buried yesterday
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we haven’t had a fight hear yet But wee are expecting it every day for they had sent off nearly all there sick to Get them out of the way I think wee will go back to our Regiment and leave our Cannons, but I don’t like it much for I like the artillery service very will, but we don’t get to do what we rather do all the time
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Bud Ivie is about well Barey sends you his best respects so I must close for this time for Bary wants me to rite for him
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March 24th 1862 TPF letter Co. E
We have a good deal of sickness in Camps at present, some 20 of our company are sick and have been sent to the Hospital in consequence of an expected fight here, but it has not come off yet nor do I think it will soon; Capt Loveless is sick and gone to the Hospital. W.H. Steel died a few days ago. as probably you will hear before this reaches you . The Capt could not get to send him home in consequence of an order from Gen McGruder allowing no person to leave here at present, it will not be long in my opinion ; We have no war news to write you none more than what you hear in Georgia
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Wm Reeves is rather unwell, but not seriously ill; Mr. Edwards has been unwell since he came back, but is getting better, I do not know when I shall be home, as no furloughs are being given at present
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March 25th 1862 MC letter Yorktown, Va. Co. D
we taken up Yankee Prisoners to day and 7 of them yesterday and I mite get in the fight for what I now
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I will send you some money by Mr Steel I will send ten dollars and if that ain’t as much as you need, Barey will send you forty dollars all he has got
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March 30th 1862 DSAG letter Yorktown, Va. Co. C
there has been some excitement here for the last few days, they had us up in the line of battle Friday morning before day but the Yanks did not come it has been the report that about 60,000 Yanks were advancing on us son Fary day they fell back and yesterday they were advancing again we expected to have been drawn up before day this morning, but they didn’t disturb us, we have been reinforcing for four or five days
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the health of the Company is very good
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all the Boys air keen for a fight
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April 1862
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April 5th 1862 WLF diary Co. K
The bombardment of Yorktown began
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April 7th 1862 WLF diary Co. K
The siege of Yorktown continues
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April 11th 1862 DSAG letter Yorktown, Va. Co. C
there are a great deal of excitement hear now we, have been in the line of battle every since last Saturday morning at day light, on Saturday we had some Cannonading for a right smart while but no damage on hour side hour battery fired some few times at them I tell you the bombs sung pretty over hour heads one of the bombs tore a negroes arm off, that’s all the damage as yet, I don’t no when we will have a general engagement it may be to day and it may be several days
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I seen the Yanks Balloon go up several time
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the Gen’l is in a hurry to start
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I can hear Cannon firing, all of hour boys but 4 are able to be in action we are all anxious for a fight I want it to come of for I think we can whip
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April 15th 1862 TPF letter Co. E
I give all the news of interest, nothing has taken place since, only the firing of a few Cannon by the Yankees at us, but without doing any injury, I cant tell when the battle will come on, but certainly before many days, I wrote yesterday that Joe Wooten and Dolph Morrison had been over to see us. I hope have looking for Alf and Tom to day but they haven’t come yet, I have had no chance to go to see them; Count I believe the boys said was at Richmond so all the rest of them are hear, I intend to try to see them all before many days, Also cousin Luther, Payton Ivie Benson and all the Grant and Ivie boys are here, I have not yet seen them, Capt Loveless is yet in the Hospital but is mending some also Sgt Williams Burton, Quinton, Siloam Goode Joe Taylor Ike Hazelwood and Ben are all in the Hospital, Some in camps are grunting mostly, with the Bomb fever
The Boys have learned how to dodge very well since the Yankees have been firing at us, We watch the flash of the Cannon when they fire and every man drops behind the breastworks till the balls pass when we rise and watch again, they whistle very close to our heads some times, but none of us have been hurt yet
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Lieut P.F. is right side up, and getting on finely
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April 20th 1862 MC letter Yorktown, Va. Co. D
this fight is yet a going on and I don’t now when I will come
We have fighting some Every day or night since the fifth of this instant But not in our line But not far off in about 2 miles or two and a half wee can hear them mighty close But wee don’t see much for that for wee whip them on Every front our loss has bin vary light I don’t now the number we had one Col killed from N.C.
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I think this fight will Decide the wore it is the opinion of a heap of men for our forces is all hear
Wednesday sow and the Yankees forces is nearly all hear from what the Yankees prisoners says they say this fight will decide this wore
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times looks vary Gloomy now But I think it will alter in a short time from the looks of Everything
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this is a hard Country the trees is Just Breeding out
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April 22nd 1862 WLF diary Co. K
I am glad to say to you that I am again good health, think I will go to the Regiment to morrow, perhaps I may not go to till Saturday Lieut. Ferguson is here with me very unwell if he does not get better Tomorrow I shall not go till Saturday
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Another sun has rose bright and clear, I am well Lieut. Ferguson
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I went to Yorktown and reported for duty. I now soon became familiar with those Missiles called Bomb Shells
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April 23rd 1862 TPF letter Co. E
There is a great deal of talk about Richmond now some are of the opinion that a great fight will come on here soon, while others think that Richmond and even all Virginia will be entirely evacuated by our forces for a while and leave it at the mercy of the Yankees, This I hope will not be done, I have no idea it will not do I think there will any fight soon I think if any movement is being made by the Enemy it will be to try to cut off our supplies and starve us out, but I have no fears of their success in this, There is no opinion as to peace being made, when we whip them, then we will have peace and not before, As to a furlough there is none being given now, don’t expect there will be soon
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April 24th 1862 TPF letter Co. E
The great fight here has not yet come off, though the enemy is yet lying around here; Some are of the opinion there will yet be no fight I cannot tell about this, they have been here long enough to have had several fights if they were very anxious, there may yet be a fight but I have some doubts about it
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April 25th 1862 MC letter Yorktown, Va. Co. D
I can say to you that we are in the ditches yet and I don’t now when we will Get out of them But I hope in a short time
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we have some fighting everyday with Canons not much harm done on our side wee had one man killed yesterday By one of our Cannons Bursting it killed one man and crippled 2 more not in our Regt But close By us
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the Yankees is in plain site of us all the time But they wont come and let us try them I cant rite much at time for the Canons are shooting all the time and you now it is a bad chance to rite for when they come we fall in our ditches to keep them from hitting us
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April 27th 1862 DSAG letter Yorktown, Va. Co. C
with the exception of Cold form and the cause of that is from the exposure that we have to endure go, I have not slept but one hole night since the fifth we have to ly by the breast works both day and night the Yanks has been insight every since the fifth and we have been passing shots at each other every day since that time, theirs has not had much effect yet and I cant tell what effect hours has had on them but I hope they have had more than theirs
.
we all had just as have live as die mother I don’t think it will agitate me half as much as I thought it would my reason for thinking is they have thrown a great many shell over us and round about our Camp and it has not excited me much
.
Major Best told me to remember him to you all, J R Burney he says that he would like to see Father now J W Madden told me to remember him to you all.
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I want you to pray for me for this is the hardest place to live rite that I ever saw for the bad get war and the good
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their was a bomb just then come over from the river and busted but I reckon was like all the rest of them with out any damage
.
the Yanks been lying, sits hear at us every since the fifth and no fight a consequence yet and they are fortifying them selves in sight of us it is thus hour General are smarter than I but it took to me like they have done wrong in letting lay hear fortify for we could of rallied the 10th of this month easer look to like then we can now
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I tell the Shell air whistling over lot off a boat 10 to15 cannon, just then at the Yankees on land were they let one come back at us
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the Boys air all as healthy as ever
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One of the Yanks shells like to have kill Agiten and _____ Frost best it didn’t hurt them
.
the bomb are whistling over me now while I am writing, I wish we could have a fight and Hasten it for I am getting tired of being up
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April 28th 1862 MC letter Yorktown, Va. Co. D
we are in our ditches yet and I don’t now when wee will get out of them But I hope in a short time for this is a vary unhappy life to live for wee don’t get to sleep and what we do get is bad sleeping
.
there aint no harm done yet on our side of any importance I don’t think this will sort long for it is to aggravating to let them stay sow close to us than they may worst us for what I now
.
the Cannons is Roaring in every direction sow I must close for this time for there is sow much noise that I cant rite much But I will again in a few days if I am spared
.

May 1862
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May 1862 From Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia, in the words of, Col. James H Huggins & Maj. William Barclay
when it was ordered to Richmond but a very short time, it was ordered to Yorktown, where it remained until the evacuation of that place, which event occurred on the 3rd day of May, 1862. During this eventful siege the regiment was commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Barclay. While at this point it was assigned to the brigade of General Rains, in the division of Major General D.H. Hill.
.. After the retreat commenced, the regiment was on the field of the Battle of Williamsburg, but were not in the engagement. The hardships, privations and sufferings endured during this tedious retreat, were very severe, and in the opinion of many, only excelled by the disastrous retreat of Napoleon Bonaparte from Moscow. Certain it is, that no march or retreat during this war, can bear any comparison to it. The Twenty Third suffered very severely, many men died from the sufferings and exposure they underwent; and when we reached Richmond or it’s vicinity, not more then one half the men and officers reported for duty.
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May 3rd 1862 WLF diary Co. K
After destroying all our Stores and Artillery that we could not carry off we retreated under cover of night, Leaving the Peninsular in the hands of the Yankees.
We made our way towards Richmond. We were all mad at having to leave our fortifications without a general Engagement but we afterwards found that the retret was a wise piece of business
.
May 4th 1862 WLF diary Co. K
We stood in line of battle day and night, at Williamsburg. Wet, Bad weather
.
May 5th 1862 WLF diary Co. K
The Battle of Williamsburg, Va., the Muddiest time I ever experienced in life
.
Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
At Williamsburg the rear of our army had quite a battle. This retreat lasted several days, and its sufferings are indescribable. The country is low between the great rivers, there was no mud, but water and slush from shoe mouth to knee deep, no place in or out of the road to spread a blanket and much of the time raining. It was said there were 16,000 thousand soldiers who died in Richmond as a result of this retreat.
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May 6th 1862 WLF diary Co. K
Left the field en rout for Richmond having done 3 days without any thing to eat, we were very near gone up the spout on several occasions
.
May 7th 1862 WLF diary Co. K
Battle of West Point, Yankees repulsed
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
Coming within six or eight miles of Richmond our line of battle was formed and it must have been several miles in length. The division to which I belonged, D.H. Hills, was next to the right of our army and over near the James. Here we lay for several days and in the meantime McClellan coming up there was more or less skirmishing along the line every day. Both armies were mostly in a timbered country and these skirmishes were called feeling of the enemy and for the purposes of locating his position. Sometimes in these, two or three hundred would be killed and wounded, but these never counted in the news of the battle.
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May 16th 1862 WLF diary Co. K
The Army got to Richmond and made a stand. Formed a line of defense and began fortifying
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May 18th 1862 DSAG letter Camp Winder Richmond, Va. Co. C
our boys are all well, very much fatigued but they take it cheerfully, some of the boys have come since I left, they left the Regt about 15 miles below, still marching on up this way and I hear yesterday that it was in six miles of hear
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May 18th 1862 MC letter Richmond, Va. Co. D
am the worst wore out that I ever was in my life for we have been on a force march for over two weeks where the mud was so deep that we could hardly travel But we had landed hear this morning in 2 miles of Richmond and is stopped lying rite by our Guns and we don’t know how soon we will move again, we have left Yorktown and went to Williamsburg and followed they Yankees followed us and we had a big fight there and then we left there also and put out for this plase
.
But not lost none yet nor none in our Regt we was held back as Reserves and we got news to go in the evening and then we went in double quick time for three miles But we did not get there in time for night come on
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we haven’t drawed no money yet now, I don’t know when we will
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we had to through away almost all our clothes and blankets but we have got as many now as we can carry
.
May 19th 1862 DSAG letter Camp Winder Richmond, Va. Co. C
I will start for my Company in a few mints it is about 1 mile or two from town
.
May 21st 1862 WLF diary Co. K
Battle of Pines began
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May 22nd 1862 TPF letter Co. E Evening Richmond, Va.
our army around Richmond is lying very still, and I hear but little of the Yankees in the last few days, I suppose they are slipping around trying to sneak in some place that we are not watching
.
James Kimbrel has his fore and middle finger on his right hand shot off Just below the first Joint done accidentally by himself
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Pate looks pretty healthy, he has been at the Hospital a week or two
.
John C Grant is dead he died at Petersburg Va. of fever some weeks ago and was buried there, also Joe Fields is dead and buried here at Richmond, the rest of the boys are all well and with their Regiments
.
Elijah Echols is dead, he died in Feb or March
.
There is a great deal of talk about Richmond now some are of the opinion that a great fight will come on here soon, while others think that Richmond and even all Virginia will be entirely evacuated by our forces for a while and leave it at the mercy of the Yankees
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As to a furlough there is none being given now, don’t expect there will be soon
.
my chances are going to be very bad for writing when I go to camps again for we have no tent nor nothing else only Just what we pick up and carry when ever we are ordered to march, I me a blanket yesterday and carpet sack, am going to carry one suit in it one on my back and that is all I want at a time
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May 23rd 1862 WLF diary Co. K
Suffered heavy loss, loosing 18 killed and 69 wounded, Co. K’s loss was as follows: Capt A Young, Corpl. George Lewis, Privates J.N. Stiles, W.P. Bryan, and R.P. Daniel wounded, and S.K. Moore killed – we lay on the Battle field that night
.

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This is Fort Delaware, where the Privates of the 23rd were sent after their capture

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Old Capitol Prison in Washington DC, where the Officers of the 23rd were kept

While in Washington the Baltimore Relief Association came to see us and gave us underclothing and tobacco which we very much needed. We had plenty of friends beyond the Potomac who wished us well, but they did not come with guns in their hands to help us when we went over to see them. The privates were sent from here to Ft. Delaware, and the officers were kept here and imprisoned in the old capitol.
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May 23rd 1863 WLF Diary Co. K
Passed through Richmond, Va., and continued our ride through Petersburg where we met with some of the Regt. Patrolled
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May 24th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Got to Goldsborough and went to Kinston that night and taken up camps
.
May 25th, 26th, 27th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Regulating camps, Digging wells, and fixing for living. The boys that had been captured were coming in very fast all that were well got in by this time
.
May 29th & 30th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
All calm and nothing of note transpired. We were well pleased with our station. Very hot weather. Fishing was the order of the day
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Bridge over Chickahominy River on Mechanicsville road at Seven Pines

May 31st 1862 From Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia, in the words of, Col. James H Huggins & Maj. William Barclay
The Battle of Seven Pines, fought upon the 31st day of May, 1862, was the first engagement in which this regiment was regularly engaged. The regiment went into the fight commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Barclay with four hundred men, and lost eighty men killed and wounded. After the fight was over, the regiment was publicly complimented by General D.H. Hill for the conspicuous gallantry which it had displayed during the fight. He said that it was owing to the manner in which the Twenty-third Georgia had conducted itself, that the tide of battle was turned in favor of the Confederate Army on that bloody day.
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
One day, I don't remember dates, our division was moved from its position towards the left of our army and went into camp near the York river railroad. That night there was the heaviest rain, the loudest peals of thunder, and the most vivid lightning I ever saw and every one was wet. Next morning we dried out as well as possible, saw that our guns and ammunition were in good condition and took up line of march down the railroad. We marched, it seemed to me, a couple of miles, when we turned off to the right into an old field and were brought to a halt fronting some woods, after going perhaps a half mile. Here an orderly rode up with a bolt of domestic which was torn into strips and tied to our caps. This began to look like something was going to happen, but I felt no uneasiness.
With the strips upon our caps, we moved in the direction we had started, about one fourth mile, when we were halted and in line of battle fronted where we supposed was the enemy. The order was given, forward guide center march, which we did to an old unused road where we were again halted and stood in battle line. While in this position an officer rode up and told our Colonel a cannon would fire somewhere along the line and at the report of the third gun to move forward, and "You won't go far before you strike the enemy".
As the noise of the last gun died away, we moved to the front as one man. We had not gone far before we found a swamp with water knee deep to waist deep and with bushes and briars almost impenetrable. Through this swamp we could not go in battle line when every Captain preserving his distance forced his way through, the Yankees in the meantime shooting at us.
We came across almost under their breastworks, and the order "Company into line" again put us into battle shape, when with a whoop and a rebel yell we mounted their works and put them on the run. We drove them about one half mile, killing and wounding many.
We lost in this engagement; 18 killed and 52 wounded. I recollect all the particulars of this battle (Seven Pines) so far as the conduct of our regiment was concerned, as if yesterday. . I was not excited, cooler and more sensible than afterwards. In battle, I was always scared ever afterwards until under fire, when a kind of reckless, "don't care" kind of feeling came over me, and I was really not myself.
Strange as it may seem, I have been where shot and shell were falling all around, yet when it was over, I have been surprised at the shortness of the time. When the battle is over, and you have escaped, again normal and at yourself, how thankful one is.
The first men I saw killed in battle was here, and it shocked me, yet before the war was over, I could calmly sleep with the dead all about. The Bible says "we are fearfully and wonderfully made", and I guess it is the truth in many ways. We can accommodate ourselves to most any kind of situation.
As we mounted the breastworks, and started the Yankees to running in this battle, I passed a quartermaster's tent who had left it in a hurray and there were great sheets of greenbacks scattered all about, enough to have made us all rich, but we tramped it in the mud, never picking up a dollar. Were we not loyal to our Confederate dollar, and patriotic to the cause?
We returned to our camps after the battle when the division was reviewed, and General Hill highly complimented the 23rd regiment.
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June 1862
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June 1st 1862 WLF diary Co. K
the Battle ended late that evening, but we again rested upon the battle field, having driven the enemy across the Chickahomany River we here gained a glorious victory but it cost us dearly, the ground was drenched with Freeman’s blood.
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June 2nd 1862 WLF diary Co. K
We returned to Camps tired and sleepy and not far from being hungry, we were soon piled about on the ground asleep and resting our selves from our fatigued after which we regulated our selves and drilled regular
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June 15th 1862 MC letter Richmond, Va. Co. D
had Bin sick for some time But some Better now then I have been in the hospital for 2 weeks last Friday Bell has staid with me every night since I have been hear, But one night and bell found out where I was & he come to see me and turned out to get me a house to stay at and found one
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our Boys has Bin in a fight since I left But I don’t now what the Carnage was for haven’t seen none of them since I left, but I hear several of the Boys was killed, but I don’t now how
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June 25th 1862 WLF diary Co. K
There having been skirmishing for several days along the frontiers. Both Armies got in earnest today and the 7 days fight began which is termed the Great Battle before Richmond
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
Here we drilled some and did pickett duty when the division was moved to the neighborhood of Mechanicsville, when commenced the seven days battles. And, there the night of our arrival, I saw a magnificent and imposing sight, our cannons on the hill, the enemy's on another, while we were in the valley between.
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June 26th 1862 From Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia, in the words of, Col. James H Huggins & Maj. William Barclay
The next engagement in which this regiment was a participant, was the Battle of Mechanicsville, which was fought on the 26th of June, 1862.
In this fight the command of the Twenty-third Georgia devolved upon Major Best.
In this action the brigade was surprised and thrown into confusion; but owing to the indefatigable exertions of Captain Huggins assisted by other officers, order was restored.
Captain Huggins retained command until the enemy had disappeared from our front.
The loss in the twenty-third from this fight was slight.
The regiment was engaged in the Battle of Cold Harbor the same day, and two days afterwards participated in the Battle of White Oak Swamp, and the day afterwards, was again engaged in the terrible Battle of Malvern Hill.
In all these engagements we were commanded by Captain Huggins, and lost very heavily in killed and wounded. Soon after the battles around Richmond, Lieutenant Colonel Barclay was promoted to Colonel to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Colonel Hutcherson, Major Best was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, and Captain Huggins to Major.
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June 26th 1862 WLF diary Co. K
Battle of the Chickahomany Swamps
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Unburied Dead from the Battle of Cold Harbor 1862

Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
The bloodiest of these seven days, and there were several, was that of Cold Harbor. Here we turned the enemy's right after a bloody fight; the retreat began and there was severe fighting on all the roads to Malvern Hill where was fought the last battle.
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June 27th 1862 WLF diary Co. K
Battle of Mechanicsville in the morning, J.R. England and E.B. Shastain, wounded. Yankees torn into jiblets Battles of Gaines Mills and Cold Harbor in the evening at the latter place I got wounded about one hour by sun
.. The Battle of Cold Harbor was one of the most desperate ever fought, but at the right time Stonewall came in their rear and Completed a glorious victory to Southern Arms, but the siege is not yet ended, I lay on the Battle Field that night
. June 28th 1862 WLF diary Co. K
I made my way to the 4th Georgia Hospital in Richmond 17 miles from where I was wounded. The Battle of White Oak Swamps were fought today
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June 29th and 30th 1862 WLF diary Co. K
The fighting was general, the Yanks were retreating slowly
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
I recollect at one place, Savage Station, while they behind breastworks were looking for us to coime one way, our men came up behind them and shot them in their tracks.
I never saw so many dead on so small a piece of ground. Singly and in squads they surrendered, and in a swampy, unknown and heavily timbered country, disserved and dismembered as they were it is no wonder.
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June 30th 1862 MC letter Richmond, Va. Co. D
I have been hear for 4 weeks and has Bin vary sick Best I think in afew days I will go to the Regiment Bell was hear a week ago and he said that Bary had some 2 or 3 letters for me and he would fetch them to me But I haven’t seen him since
.
I will tell you that it is Scary looking times hear now for they have been fighting now for a week and I can see a half dozen dead men any time I will look out it is frown full times hear now in every respect
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I haven’t seen any of the boys since I left them and I cant hear nothing only by the papers and that ant much I must say something about the fight that is going on hear I don’t Expect there Ever was such a one in world and is still going on they had got this city rite full of Yankee prisoners there is said to Be five thousand of them that looks like it would thin them out and we have killed them By thousands and wee have got them Surrounded now that wee think we will get them all nearly
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wee haven’t drawed now money since I sent the other home
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as we came on from Yorktown I gave a dollar for one little chicken and cared it all day and I thought that was vary hard times But every thing is mighty high hear Bacon hams is worth from 75 cts to 1 dollar per pound and Every thing in potion little bits chickens not half grown 75 cts a piece and I do hop this thing wont last long if it dose I don’t now will Become of the Soldiers for shoes is worth fifteen dollars a pair and all other clothing in proportion
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July 1862
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
McClellan had a splendid army, superior in numbers to ours, but not altogether the kind of material as our own, which up to that time knew of no such word as defeat. Had McClellan not been a good general, he never could have gotten his army under the cover of his gun boats at Malvern Hill. Upon the road I was, whole companies would come out before us, raise the white flag and surrender. They were terribly demoralized after their lines were broken. After a trying time, McClellan from all the roads and battle fields succeeded in reaching the river where we attacked him and it would have been better for us had we not done so. With his gun boats behind him, his position almost impregnable upon the hill, it was an unnecessary and hazardous undertaking. We had already put him back where he started and there was nothing to gain, comparable to the probable loss of life.
In all these battles, our loss was pretty heavy, but nothing to compare to the loss of life, the number of wounded, captured and the destruction of the property of the enemy.
We captured many of their teams, wagons, hospital stores, camp equipage, provisions and guns, better then we had.
I was in charge of the litter corps of our regiment in all this, but the regiment fortunately was never seriously engaged except at Malvern Hill.
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July 1st 1862 WLF diary Co, K
Battle of Malvern Hill, Here both armies fought like heroes from Daylight to Dark with but little result. But the Yankees left under cover of night and went to their Gun Boats
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July 1st 1862 War Record of Samuel Tate Hammontree Co. E
Helped, and the only man who helped, General R.E. Lee move his telescope on top of Malvern Hill, Va., with bullets falling all around me
.
July 1st 1862 From The Civil War Record of Robert Emmett Lawhon Co. F
R E Lawhon was wounded only one other time. At Malvern Hill, Va., a spent grape shot caused quite a sore place but could hardly be called more then a bruise. It was after this Battle that a wagon load of legs and arms passed by. The rain had poured all night long and they had been washed clean of blood and dirt and were bleached perfectly white
.
July 2nd 1862 WLF diary Co. K
Our Army now returned to Richmond Crowned with Victory for which they had dearly paid. In this fight our Co. lost 2 killed Viz: J.C. Patterson, and Joseph Hays – and J.R. England, E.B. Chastain, R.A. Hays, Alfred Adams, N.D. Nicholson and myself were wounded, the hospitals in Richmond and else where were crowded with wounded. Everybody have their hearts and hands both full.
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July 16th 1862 MC letter Richmond, Va. Co. D
We have drawd 25 dollars
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Bary + Boswell is both sick But I don’t they are dangerous Bary is the worst he went thru all the fight I think he is just wore out is the worst that ales him
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I am still Mending slowly
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July 17th 1862 MC letter Richmond, Va. Co. D
we had a big storm hear yesterday and day before, but we had got some tents now and we keep
.
they say that wee will draw again in a few days
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July 27th 1862 WT letter Richmond, Va. Co. C
The Yankees had bin in Camps near This Place and Fortified them selves we for many miles and had a strong force and on Wednesday the fight commenced in 2 miles of our Camps we Fell in and taken the Second Line and Stand till Dark and could sea and hear the Fight going on But we did not get shot we then were ordered Back to our Camps at 1 o’clock that night we was ordered to Mechanicsville 10 miles in some 3 miles of that Place at sun up orders to halt and Ly down a Bout 3 o’clock the show commenced we Still Remained on the Rear Line till Just before Sitting of the Sun then we went in through the main Part of the fight was over though the Cannon Balls fell Thick all Round us till 8 o’clock we still did not get a shot we staid there and The dead bodies was vary thick all Round us and it was awful Sights the trees and ground and Houses was all torn up Badly Plum to Mechanicsville 3 miles or more at day we marched up in 2 hundred yard of the Yankees Battery in Double file and the way they did throw the Balls thick and killed many we fell Back and formed and they went again and the ___y Left and followed them in quick time we all ways move in quick Time we moved from McConnellville Some 12 or 15 miles The hottest days Friday to where the Yankees had made a stand we was marched in under there Cannon Ball and then marched in and Round in many Directions the Yankees had the advantage they new the ground and Planted there Batteries and there was six hours of the Regulars firing not 2 minutes intermission I don’t think we was marching on them on three sides and This Co Regt was on the Left of the Brigade we did not get many shots in through in a Bout as much danger as any body we Lay stayed in 2 or 3 hundred yards of the Yankee Battery for Several Hours under the Hill a portion of the time
.
The way we are Put Through we haven’t the opportunity of giving a fine deception though we sea all Privates Does The fighting after all at the Present time there are No Yankees Near us at Present time we seem to be able
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Easy time in the way of Drilling not more Than 1 to 2 hours in The day The Balance of the day is taken up Cooking Eating vegetables
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have Just Drawn 20 Dol. Each and It is fine times here When Mr. Medcalf goes Back I Think I shall Send Nancy a Little More Money It will be But Little
.

August 1862
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August 3rd 1862 MC letter Richmond, Va. Co. D
Bary & Boswell has both been sick But Bary is up but Boswell ant much better But I hope he will rise in a few days
.
Mr Reaves got hear a few days ago & I got that letter and was mighty glad to hear from you
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Barey sends his Best Respects
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August 13th 1862 MC letter Richmond, Va. Co. D
there ant now chance to get furlough now
.
our Regt is Gone on Picket now I think they will come in to morrow
.
we had a Rite smart storm hear yesterday of wind But not much Rain
.
August 22nd 1862 W T letter Orange Court House, Va. Co. C
The Company are generally in pretty fare health we have moved some 80 miles north west of Richmond and aint Settled though we are staying at This Place and has (been) here the last three days though I think we will move in a day or two and move this evening though I don’t no where our Wagons are at Gordonsville 10 miles Back nearer Richmond the Yankees here Lately has been in this Settlement and a Little fight in This Town and one in a ten miles Two _____ ago one 21 miles of and today I saw 65 prisoners taken in the Last fight It seams that they are falling Back from This Section. The Prisoners Tell many tales they say they are fighting for the Stars and Stripes They said a good deal a Bout Abe Rail Splitting and they are as tired of the War as we are and wonder why we Don’t come on there Soil they could fight us as hard again There are Some of them hard Cases and hold they are Right. They generally Say They have quit volunteering Serving and Abe is Drafting They all seam to no Stone wall Jackson and his foot Cavalry
.
The most of our forces has moved from Richmond here and her a Bout Jackson’s forces and Longstreet’s are in front of us there some Eight Thousand Troops camped in this Town Some thinks we will Be sent to Nashville Tenn. But I think we will go Back near Richmond and I has Just as Soon go any other coarse this is pretty country here and fine people and we are Eating Them out fast But we give them our money The Peninsular is a Low Swampy Pore country and no Place at all in fact I have been over so much of it I don’t what (want) to sea it any more here I can look at the Blue Ridge an mountain and fine farms
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See Pretty hard times But are getting use to them I have in my Haver Sack 3 days rationing and It is crackers and a Pound of fat Bacon my gun and Equipments wais 35 to 40 pounds and I may have to tote it 20 miles a and Some Times march all night though I am well and in good Health and when It Rains we take on a marching and we never now one hour where we will Be the next when we are Sorty Stationed we have Some tents
.

September 1862
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Col. Alfred H. Colquitt's Brigade crossed at Cheek's Ford (Mouth of Monocacy, south side);
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [Sept 4th 1862]
Our march from Richmond to Maryland was a long one and we were all footsore and weary. We waded the Potomac at Leesburg and became the rear of Lee's army, McClellan, who had again been put in command being on the same side of the river following close behind.
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September 7th 1862 MC letter Frederick, Md. Co. D
well J Mc Just Got to us to day we have bin marching for 3 weeks we are over in Mari land I don’t now how wee will come out yet
.

these are Union dead at Gettysburg
uniondeadatgettysburg.jpg
this is the kind of site the 23rd would have witnessed across the 2nd Bull Run Battlefield

We missed the Big fight at Manassas which was a hard fight there I saw one awful site on the Battle field of dead and wounded Yankees, Bary and Boswell is both left behind not dangerous
.
Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
Our division was the last to leave Richmond and was in none of this, but we passed over the Manassas battle field while many of the dead were yet unburied.
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September 7th 1862 TPF letter Frederick, Md. Co. E
You be some what surprised to hear from me in Maryland, but we are here. Our Brigade crossed the Potomac night before last. I crossed yesterday morning with the wagons being in charge of them. Part of our forces have advanced 16 or 20 miles into the state.
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Gen Jackson’s army is at or beyond Frederick City some 4 or 5 miles from here we are 10 or 12 miles from the River
.
We have met with no opposition yet but have had some accessions to our forces, some 4 or 5 Companies are said to have Joined us since we crossed and that more are coming
.
the people generally received us very cordially
.
the weather is very fine now though rather warm, I am in good health so most of the Company I regret very much to say that Capt Loveless. Lieuts. Ferguson and Kelly are all behind sick. I am detailed with the wagons so that our Co. has no officers of their own, though one is appointed to take charge of them, to day is Sunday and we are resting the first rest we have had in two weeks, we will move on in the morning. I don’t know what direction we will go but I suppose toward Baltimore at least I hope so
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to day is Sunday and we are resting the first rest we have had in two weeks, we will move on in the morning
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I don’t know when I will have a chance to send my letter back to Orange, as we have no mail from there only as wagons passes and it is 70 or 80 miles.
.

The picture is at the Hist Soc of Frederick Co. Md
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This is Confederate troops heading west on Patrick St. at Market St. in Frederick, Md. July 12,1862

Reminisces of Hugh Barclay Sept 13th 1862
We rested one day at Frederick and continued our march to Hagerstown where went into camp. This was Saturday the 13th of September 1862, and that evening the cavalry reported the enemy not far away.
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September 14th thru 17th 1862 From Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia, in the words of, Col. James H Huggins & Maj. William Barclay
The next active service performed by the regiment, was during the world renowned campaign into the state of Maryland.
The march was executed without any incident connected with the regiment worthy of notice, until the Battle of South Mountain, or as it is perhaps equally called, the Battle of Boonsboro, at which place the Twenty-third Georgia acted a very conspicuous part.
It held a very important position on the left of the turnpike, where it winds through a pass in the mountains, against very heavy odds, and inflicted heavy loss upon the enemy.
This position was held in the face of an overpowering foe, when our ammunition was so nearly exhausted that we could only keep up a show of fight by an irregular, scattering fire.
As evidence of the heat of the engagement, the loss of this gallant regiment, amounting to ninety men killed and wounded, out of three hundred carried into action, will sufficiently testify.
In this fight at least seventy thousand Yankees were beaten back and kept back for many hours by major General D.H. Hill’s Division alone.
.. After the death of Colonel Barclay, Lieutenant Colonel Best was promoted to the rank of Colonel, Major Huggins to Lieutenant Colonel, and Captain M.R. Ballenger to Major. All of these officers having been wounded, the command of the regiment devolved upon a captain for several months, during which time the regiment marched with the army from the Potomac near Shepherdstown, to Fredericksburg, the men suffering extraordinary privations upon the march, which was almost equal to the horrid retreat from Yorktown.
Many of the men without a murmur, walked barefoot through the snow for days, until they were ordered by General D.H. Hill to make and wear raw hide moccasins, to which however they were very much opposed, as they were exceedingly uncomfortable
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Following is first hand information from witnesses describing South Mountain at Col. E.F. Best’s Court Martial
September 14th 1862
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Capt. J.P. Patton
there was a detachment of the Companies of my regiment under command of [Lt. Col. Emory F Best]. My Company was one of the companies of that detachment, the detachment went up the mountain to support a battery about the time in (that is the detachment) got up on the mountain where the battery was, the bullets of the enemy “were coming pretty thick” We were then scattered about a good deal. It was a very warm place, and the men broke ranks, but did not go off very far, but sheltered themselves
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When in first went up the mountain to the battery I seen [Colonel Best]within about twenty yards of it. The enemy was firing pretty terribly upon the battery at that time. Perhaps fifteen minutes afterwards, I again seen [Colonel Best]he was then near me. This was after the ranks was broken. As soon as we got on the ground in range of the Yankee Sharp Shooters, our men became scattered. The accused came up to where several of us men were standing and lying down, scattering our men behind rocks etc. This was right at the battery about fifteen yards right behind it. [Colonel Best]then ordered us back, and we started back to the Regiment. We got back about half way (We had been about a mile from the Regiment) when we met.
Genl Longstreet and our Adjutant General. [Colonel Best]was present with us. [Colonel Best]was ordered by that officer to take his detachment back on the ____ of the Mountain “where we had first left” The officer told the accused that it was by order of Genl Longstreet for him to go back to the place I have spoken of. At that time our detachment was a little to one side of the road having given way for a Brigade which was passing.
The road was full of troops. I was with the detachment. Long afterwards either the same or another officer came up and said something to [Colonel Best]to which [Colonel Best]replied that he was ordered to report to his Regiment. This was to the best of my recollection, but a very few minutes after the first appearance of the staff – officers as mentioned.
On the Mountain, I saw no courier or staff officers having any orders to [Colonel Best]nor did I have any during the march back towards the Regiment except as I have stated. The detachment then went back to the Regiment.
I saw Colonel Barclay and [Colonel Best]together some fifteen minutes after the return of the detachment to the Regiment, but I heard no conversation between them.
The battery on the Mountain fell back before our detachment. When we fell back, the detachment was not in very good order, but we were in ranks.
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I do not know what battery the accused as ordered to support at South Mountain, that is I don’t know the name of it. I don’t remember that [Colonel Best]gave orders to the detachment when we came to it, while supporting the battery at South Mountain. I think the entire command was sheltered while near that battery. The Commanding Officers of the battery and his detachment were right in front of us. I think some of them were sheltered. The men of our detachment were more scattered then usual in action; but I don’t suppose they were so much as not be under control of [Colonel Best]or their immoderate commanders. Company E was more scattered then any of the rest. I can not say whether the officer who presumably commanded that company during the Maryland campaign was efficient or inefficient. I do not know who commanded it at South Mountain. I did not see Genl D.H. Hill while the detachment was at the battery.
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[Colonel Best]had the ______ control of the detachment at the time it halted by the side of the road as stated. There was no part of the detachment deployed as skirmishers.
On our retreat over the mountain, as far as I know I remember that he gave a call in of the battery as had been supporting, _______ and that some of the detachment were away in turning it to fight at the place where I have stated our detachment halted by the road side. I think the enemy was concealed. I could not see them.
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Lieut. A. Worley Co. E
I was with the detachment of four companies of my Regiment sent under command of [Colonel Best], then the Lt. Colonel of the Regiment;
On the 14th of September 1862 at South Mountain, up to the top of the Mountain to support a battery there.
This was about a half a mile from our Regiment. It was I think a little after 12 o’clock in the day when we started from the regiment. We got to the top of the mountain and formed in line, and were ordered to lie down, some twenty yards in rear of the battery. We were under a pretty considerable fire of musketry, but none of artillery then. A very short time after we got there the battery limbered up and retreated. Our battery detachment ______ some three or five minutes, after the battery moved ; when Capt. Patton about faced us, and marched us down the mountain in retreat.
About the time the detachment got to its position on the top of the mountain and lay down. we had marched down the mountain in retreat some sixty or seventy yards,
My Company did not scatter to take shelter. Officers and men lay down but they had nothing to shelter them. They down in line of Battle. There was some scattering growth some severely there where my Company was. On the left of the growth was perhaps thicker, and at some distance from the left there were tall rocks. until [Colonel Best]repositioned the command in the retreat, as stable. After we got some seventy of eighty yards from our position on the mountain, we came to when a caisson was turned over, and we halted until it was “righted up”. Which then “Longstreet’s men” came up, and the officer in command asked for the officer in commanding our detachment, and gave [Colonel Best] orders that we should go to the front with them.
We did not go to the front but went back to our Regiment. I was wounded at South Mountain.
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My opinion is that my Company was not scattered on the top of the Mountain, at South Mountain. That they were in regular line after they got on the mountain. While on the mountain, Capt. Patton’s Company was on the right, mine next, I think Capt. Steel’s was on the extreme left. I don’t remember what other Company was with us. I did not see the commanding officer of the battery to know him. I saw Genl. Hill
When we retreated, we were first about = faced and marched off in line of battle. I did not know there was any line of skirmishers behind us on the retreat from the top of the mountain. I think the right of the detachment was right about opposite the battery. The detachment did not occupy but our position that I know of while we were on the mountain.
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Capt. R.N. Groves Co. B
we were lying down on the top of the mountain
We marched down the Mountain, some eighty or one hundred yards to where a caisson was turned over in the road. We then met some of Genl. Longstreet’s command. At that place an officer told [Colonel Best] to fall in with the detachment at the head of the Brigade. The officer had asked [Colonel Best] about the detachment before, and [Colonel Best] had told him that we had been sent up to support battery “and how it was” other Officers ordering [Colonel Best] to fall in with “the Brigade” [Colonel Best] said that he had orders from Genl. Hill to return to his Regiment. I don’t recollect that the Officers said anything in reply.
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Lieut. J.R. Pritchitt Co. I
I was with the detachment under [Colonel Best] at South Mountain. [Colonel Best] with the detachment was on the top of the Mountain. The orders have been given to lie down. The men and some, but not all of the officers were lying down.
[Colonel Best] when he came up ordered the detachment back. We met an aid to Genl Longstreet, who ordered [Colonel Best] to take his detachment back to the top of the mountain
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Lieut. M.A. Collins Co. E
At South Mountain
When the detachment was marched up, up on the Mountain, we had orders to lie down, by [Colonel Best].
When the detachment first got there, a part of it was exposed, and the other part was protected by the crest of the mountain. Afterwards the exposed position was ordered to fall back, and took shelter behind some rocks.
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Serg. D.C. Roberts Co. I
I was with the detachment at South Mountain. [Col Best] marched us up to the top of the mountain, and went to the officer Commanding the battery. He then came back, and marched the detachment farther forward. There the detachment lay down.
While we were lying down, [Col Best]came up and lay down behind my Company. I am certain I noticed him there one time.
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Priv. W.H.T. Lewis Co. D
I was at the Battle of Sharpsburg, I was wounded at the third halt of the Regiment. Just before I was wounded, [Col Best] and Col. Barclay passed over the line, and went toward the right, I was on the left.
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Lieut. T.T. Moss Co. G
At Sharpsburg Capt. Sharp was the third Senior Captain of the Regiment. His Company was the third Company from the right, and the right Company was skirmishing.
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sunkenroadstonewallsouthmountain.jpg
sunken road and stone wall at South Mountain

Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [Sept 14th 1862]
Next morning, Sunday the 14th, we marched back a few miles to South Mountain, formed line of battle and waited the coming of McClellan's advance. About 3 o' clock in the evening the pickets began firing, the position of the 23rd Geo. Was about half way down the mountain to the left of the road, seven companies of which were behind a rock fence and the other three companies D.E. & B, exposed, my company B. one of them. The Yankees advanced in great force, and seemingly with much assurance. For a while we three companies made it as warm as possible for them, but soon we were shot out. In fifteen minutes with 32 men in my company, 23 were killed and wounded, five dead on the field. The other companies, D & E, suffered in about the same ratio. I have never been able to account for my escape. We were lying flat on the ground and upon our knees to shoot. Sergent Price by whose side I was lying, and who is now, if living, a Baptist preacher, in North Georgia, received several wounds, and a man on my right was shot in the forehead, fell dead across me. When my company was shot out, I got behind a big rock which was in line with the regiment behind the rock fence and there I found Lt. Steel of Company D. We were lying side by side looking at the blaze of fire from the men behind the rick fence and listening to the hurrahs of the Yankees who made charge after charge when an occasional bullet came up the line our way. Lt. Steel remarked, "They have flanked the regiment on their right and we will be captured". I told him I thought not or hoped not, when just then I heard the dull thud of the bullet that hit him, and he said "I am killed". He never moved, and the bullet that hit him, must have entered his heart. It must have gone over me or under me for I was nearest the direction from whence it came.
.. This battle, much of it, was at night, as late as 9 o' clock it must have lasted. The regiment behind the rock fence were about out of ammunition, and fortunately about this time the Yankees ceased firing. Our troops away to the right were giving away and word was passed up the line to quietly slip away which the men did, and the regiment escaped capture. The loss here to the regiment was confined principally to the three companies. Away to our right we suffered considerably, losing many men and officers, and among the latter, my brother, E.S. Barclay, Lt. Col. Phillips, Geo. Legion who was seriously wounded, and though he lived a year or so thereafter, never recovered.
.. The enemy, some of our men said who were wounded and captured said the Yankees loss in front of the rock wall was about 300 killed, including the Federal General Reneau.

mainstreetinsharpsburgmd.jpg
This is Main through the village of Sharpsburg, Maryland the 23rd marched through after South Mt.

.. All that Sunday night we marched, passing through the village of Sharpsburg and went into camps on the banks of the Potomac.
.. After the close calls I had in this battle, it would seem I never should have been scared thereafter, but such was not the case.
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [Sept 16th 1862]
.. We remained in this camp until Tuesday morning when we went back towards Sharpsburg and took up our position in line of battle.
.. All day long the armies were gathering in position and there we stood until about 4 o' clock in the evening, when there was a little skirmishing all along the line at places, but no serious fighting. As night came on, our regiment fell back a 100 yards from the brow of the hill upon which we had stood and lay down in an old road. We all knew and felt there was bloody work for tomorrow.
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remainsofmummashousebattleofantietam.jpg
Remains of the Mumma's House, that burned by Confederates to deny Union Sharpshooters a position

Mumma's barn
remainsofmummashousebattleofantietam3.jpg
This is the remains of the burning barn the 23rd hurried past a little to their left

Reminiscences of Hugh W Barclay
Brother William passed about among the men and I heard him say "The man who survives tomorrow, will never forget the day", and with me it has been true, for never since has the 17th of September come and gone, and I have forgotten it or the memory of the great battle of that day. Both armies ready just at the break of day the battle commenced.
Our regiment was hurried a little way to our left, passing a burning barn and in the yard were dead men, hogs, turkeys, and so on, killed in a skirmish in the evening before; the sight was awful. In a hurry, double quick, a little farther on we fronted towards the enemy and were ordered to charge. With our faces to the enemy and the rebel yell we went for them, three columns deep to our one.
At every discharge of our guns I could see great gaps in their lines, but they would close up. It was terrible fighting. When in about thirty steps of their lines, our men began to waver. It was more then mortal man could stand and they were at least three to one. It was just then that Sergeant Roberts of Floyd County cried out the Colonel was killed. It seems to me now I was so near that I just turned around, and there he lay dead. By this time our men were falling back, turning occasionally and shooting. Sergeant Roberts caught hold of his shoulders and I of his feet to bring him out, when Lt. Prichett came to our relief and caught hold with Roberts when a bullet went through his dead body and wounded Prichett. Roberts and myself then carried him a short distance and laid him down near a little clump of bushes, in an old about which was a little pile of rocks. The Yankees all about, we ran to keep from being captured. I have wished many times since, I had lain down by his side and been captured, but we don't know what we would do under such circumstances.
The enemy drove us back that day some distance, and if he was buried, they or some citizens did it. Had one of our wings given way that day, the Potomac river, just in our rear, Lee's army would have been in a bad fix, but it may be called a drawn battle.
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antietamfield.jpg
This is The Battle of Antietam, the only known photo of a civil war battle in progress

Following is first hand information from witnesses describing the Battle of Sharpsburg at Col. E.F. Best’s Court Martial
September 17th 1862
Sharpsburg
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Lieut. B.B. Moore Co. K
In the Battle of Sharpsburg, I think the 17th of September 1862, Barclay being in command. When I saw the accused, our Regiment had been advancing but had rather halted, had stopped at that time, a good many of the men lying down, some of them engaged and firing Col. Barclay was killed in the Battle of Sharpsburg.
I heard an order to advance. My company was on the extreme right of the Regiment. The Regiment advanced about one hundred yards after this, and was engaged about a half hour. The Regiment then fell back.
.. I heard no orders from any one to the Regiment, and no one seemed to be in command of it.
The Major was not in the battle
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the 27th Geo regt. was on our right. Col. Colquitt (I think he was their Colonel) Commanded the Brigade. Col. Smith’s left was only few steps from our right. When the Regiment fell back, I started back with my Company. The Regiment was falling back, before I knew anything of it. I was wounded while the Regiment was falling back,
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Private W.M. Bishop Co. G
During the Battle of Sharpsburg, my Regiment was advancing when the colors having got farther ahead than the left, there was some little confusion and the Regiment halted. We were in a cornfield, the fire of the enemy was very heavy.
The colors as well as I could judge was about seventy five yards ahead. The colors having moved more rapidly then the left. The right had moved on with the colors. I was with the left wing. It was when we halted and commenced.
At this time Col. Barclay walked up to the left and called to us of the left “Forward men, Forward”, and we moved up and came in line with the right wing.
I am certain that Col. Barclay gave the order. I do not know _____ at what state of the fight he was killed I did not see him after the advance of the left. After a while our Regiment fell back mabe a mile, and then reformed and Capt. Boston, Senior Captain present, took Command of the Regiment.
An officer, I think a Captain or lieutenant of some other Regiment passed near our left just before we advanced to support the right; and asked “What is the manor that the left is not following the colors”. It was there that Col. Barclay gave the order mentioned. There was right “smart confusion in the Regiment.
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I think the 27th Geo. was on our right and that the 13th Ala was on our left, but I am not certain.
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Capt. W.J. Boston Co. A
.. The next morning there were only about thirty some men that could be got together as the Regiment. I took command of them that morning. No one had been in command from the time of the fight to that time. [Col Best] was officially reported “Missing in action”, as well as I remember. I reported it. It was known that he was wounded
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Priv. Drewry M. Sosebee Co. E.
At Sharpsburg, the Regiment in advancing upon a high fence into an open field, and then halted and formed. We went on from there some thirty or forty yards, and we halted again. [Col Best] was to the left of the Colors I think my Company was next to the Color Company.
He was standing up, and the Regiment was lying down having gave orders to do so. When we advanced from that point I saw Capt. Gratton Col. Colquitt’s Adjutant, pass along the lines. I heard Capt. Gratton inquired for Col. Barclay. He was on the left of the Regiment. This was before Col. Barclay was killed. Capt. Gratton told [Col Best] that the orders to “Forward”. He told them to “Forward” two or three times, before they started. They then were twenty or thirty yards further
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Private Russell Bryant Co. E
I was in the battle of Sharpsburg. [Col Best] went right on behind my Company from the field where the Regiment lay the night before the Battle. He stayed close behind the Company until Col. Barclay told him to go to the right of the Regiment. This was after we crossed the high fence and formed and advanced, and halted, and started again. A few minutes afterwards I was wounded.
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while we were marching I think it was about a hundred yards from the high fence that we halted; but I was fighting so that I don’t know much about the distance.
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September 1862 War Record of Samuel Tate Hammontree Co. E
We must have many hardships and tiresome marching around Harpers Ferry
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September 1862 War Record of Samuel Tate Hammontree Co. E, only time I could find them where they would have fought along the Potomac River Sept 1864
I fought all day along the Potomac River and we had to wade it three times in one night when our clothes would freeze in a moment after we were out
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Reminiscences of Hugh W Barclay(Sept 18 1862)
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Next day, Thursday, we stood all day in line of battle, confronting each other, both armies seemingly having enough; Lee in the meantime, getting his trains across the Potomac.
Our loss in this battle was very heavy, Captains came out in command of regiments and Sergeants in command of companies. We had more straglers here then we had in all the war before. It had been a constant march and fight since leaving Richmond, many were barefooted and ragged, while all were worn out, dirty and lousy, yet we laughed.
Our miserable condition seemed to furnish a source of amusement. I, myself contributed no little to the fun. I had a pair of shoes from which the soles had taken their departure, and walking along, the uppers would climb up my legs and at this they would laugh and make remarks.
Anything out of the ordinary that would make us laugh was a blessing, and there was always some fellow that had ready the appropriate word to show it up in the right way.
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Reminiscences of Hugh W Barclay (Sept 19 1862)
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We crossed over into Virginia at Shepardstown about 2 o'clock Friday morning and the water of the Potomac was rather cool to be pleasant. The Yankees followed in the morning, some of them crossing the river where A.P. Hill lying in wait, it is said, about filled the river with their dead.
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Our army, after Sharpsburg rested a while near Winchester, cleaned up as much as we could, and supplied our numerous wants as much as possible. I got a pair of boots there from a returned soldier, for which I paid $50.00, but many of the men were as good as shoeless.
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October 1862
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October 5th 1862 MC letter Bunker Hill, Va. Co. D
I can say to you the Best friend I had in this army was killed that Col Wm Barkley
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Grandeson Mass cooks for us and I sleep with him and dock Talley
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I can say to you that we have had a powerful time we have lost a grate many of our boys I will give you there names or as many as I can think of James Steel was killed and John Thomas Columbus Jones and one of the Clonigers But Bradley and Silvers now I will give you the missing that wee lost now But what was killed and V H Hilloms and James Long is dead now comes the missing the first one Frank Bailey GW Davis one of Mose Jones Boys this is all that I can think of now
Now I will give you the wounded M.A. Collins hand mashed G.C. West head and E.H. Davis now in Thy J.M. Camp in the thy Wm Stakes in the Bowels J.A. Roland in the thy W.H.T. Lowis in the side slightly and our Col killed, Lieu Col wounded and taken prisoner Major wounded in the leg and gone home
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I can say to you that Bary has come to the Regt and is lot bet well I was mighty Glad that he was with us in the fight for it was Bad enough as it was
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October 21st 1862 MC letter Camp Richmond Va.
Dock Talley is going to start home in the morning
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November 1862
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November 16th 1862 MC letter Strausburg, Va. Co. D
we have been running Round and Round all the time
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Lieut. Gleven staid at home so long that he was dropped from the Rolls which pangs him vary much he is trying fix it up, but I think he wont get it fixed and if he don’t I am running for Lieuts place and I think I will get it but I don’t now
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it takes nearly all that I can do now to keep me going for wee cant draw enough provisions to live on wee have to buy
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December 1862
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay Prior to [Dec 13th 1862]
The Yankee army having also rested were now on the road to Richmond by the way of Fredericksburg under command of Gen. Burnsides. Our army moved, and travelling in almost parallel lines, it was a race who should get first to Fredericksburg.
The weather was cold, the ground frozen, the men not too well clothed, and many of them barefoot. It was awful.
One night on the march, Gen. Hill issued an order that the sergeants of the various companies should go wether the beeves were being slaughtered, and get their compliment of the hides, that the barefoot men should make their shoes and if any soldier was found out of his place next day and not in line, the commanding officer would be put under arrest. It was late at night when we went into camp, and the men without eating, fell upon the ground and were soon asleep. I managed, however, to arouse the sergeant who went for the hides and after his return, proceeded to awake the boys which I found a difficult matter. I told the consequences as it affected myself but they would turn over, grunt and say, "Lt. we will keep up", and again fall asleep. One or two got up and worked all night at the job. Strips for strings were cut from the hide, when enough of the hides was cut out to cover the foot, the hairy side inside, and then sewed up. Next morning standing by the fire, the hide would commence to draw up, and there was more fun. The new kind of shoe was a signal failure, when in contact with water or fire. The next day when one of these wet would fall from the foot, the soldiers bowing their heads, would pass it around and bawl like you have seen cattle when one of their number was slain. It was lots of fun and while the shoes were of no account, it was really a benefit.
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.. Gen. Hill had his aids at different points along the road, and when a man was found not in his place, his name, company and regiment was demanded. That night I was ordered to report to Gen. Hills headquarters, going there I found about 60 officers, Captains and Lts., who were told to march in rear of their companies until further orders.
In a few days we were at Fredericksburg, the Yankees about the same time, but who went into camps among the hills across the river from the city.
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.. Our division went into camp near Hamiltons Crossing and there was a general order releasing us from arrest before the battle of the 13th of December when Burnsides right wing was almost annihilated. We were on the right of our army, and of course was not much in this fight.
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [Dec 14th & 15th 1862]
On the fourteenth, the next day after the battle, all day long we confronted Franklins corps who stood in line, but not a gun was fired, and next morning, there was not a Yankee this side of the Rappahannock.
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December 18th 1862 MC letter Camp near Fredericksburg, Va. Co. D
we have Bin in another fight and coming out safe But wee did get in the fight for they Yankees run before we Got there But we have had a hard time for we march day and night Cold and hot and when we do stop we lie like dogs around our fire and the whether is mighty cold hear we have had rite smart ground hear and has bin for several days
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Talley has got Back and he left our clothes and we haven’t heard from him since he come and I suffered that we won’t get them
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I think that wee will draw in a few days
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Barey went to the hospital this morning he is sick and pretty Bad off and I am vary uneasy about him, but I hope wee will Bee better soon
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there is grate talk of us going N.C. in a short time and I hope wee will for I am tired of this Country for I had bin hear sow long that I wont to leave hear
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tell Mrs. Ives that L.S. well
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December 19th 1862 TPF letter Camp below Fredericksburg, Va. Co. E
Well as you have perhaps learned before this reaches that the Yankees have again been beaten by the Rebels; I know you have all been very anxious to hear the results of this great fight, as all Expected it would certainly come on; One hard days fighting was however done though our Division was not engaged; notwithstanding they were on the front line Monday Morning the 15th just when a general attack was Expected to be made. At day light it was found that the Yankees had all or nearly all crossed over the River; that they did not intend to give us battle here; our regiment was ready the boys were all at their posts; and had determined to meet the enemy boldly I know they would have done I; But when it was found that the enemy had give back; a thrill of Joy seemed to run through every heart; and a yell such as I hardly ever heard ran through of our noble and gallant army upon the reception of the news: I am confident if they had fought us, we Should have whipped desperately; but would necessarily have lost many good men; as it is we have a Complete victory over them, but I hear this evening that they are again crossing the River and we doubtless may have to meet them again, if we do I am satisfied we shall give them a good brushing
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James Roach to day received his discharge will start home day after tomorrow
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The boys are generally in very good health and doing finely
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December 28th 1862 MC letter Camp near Fredericksburg, Va. Co. D
I had a vary dull Christmas for wee was on Picket that day though wee got some bounty at seven dollars
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I haven’t heard from Bary since he went to the hospital, But I hope I will soon, I feel mighty lost since he left for he had been piney for some time and I have to be looking after him But I did not think hard of it
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we have the small pock in our company Wm Sta_d is the man that has the small pock and I expect that we will all have them But I had it put in my arm and it had a good affect I don’t now whether it still doing good or not but I hope it will
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we have had some vary cold weather hear but this is awfully perty day
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January 1863
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January 7th 1863 MC letter Camp Fredericksburg, Va.
I also received them close that you sent by Talley and was vary glad get them
Bary ain’t hear, for he is at the hospital yet I haven’t heard from him since he left and I am mighty uneasy about him
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Bill staid all night with me a few nights ago and he said that he was going home in a few days and he said that he would hunt for Bary and Rite to me
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [Winter 1862/3]
We made ourselves as comfortable as we could for the winter, drilled some, stood camp guard, made details to watch the Yankees and played snowball patiently awaiting the coming of warm weather, and the drying up of the roads.
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.. When idle, soldiers became restless and something must always be doing. Where the enemy would try to cross the river, whether above or below the city was always the question and all that winter we had pickets up and down the river for miles.
.. One bright moonshine night I was out with a squad of pickets overlooking the river, snow on the ground, the wind blowing a gale and bitter cold. We had gone into a kind of depression in the ground to protect ourselves from the wind, when along came General Jackson, who seeing our view of the other side of the river was all right, rode away. I can shut my eyes and see him yet. Here we were until May
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January19th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
it is likely they were in winter quarters near Fredericksburg, Va.
at this time I would be improper here to relate the condition of our Army at this time. The Confederate Army at this place numbered about 120 thousand men, who were encamped or rather posted on a line of defense 28 miles in length, i. e. from Port Royal to Culpepper along the Rappahannock River . besides scouting parties for miles in each direction who were daily skirmishing with Federal Cavalry.
.. Our Army were well clothed and shod at this time and also received a reasonable allowment of rations, the troops were generally in good health and all in the finest of spirits and willing to meet the enemy at any time when they were called upon so to do – But there was one thing we lacked which were badly needed and that were tents, the weather was cold and disagreeable and we had to take it soldier fashion just like I did and a host of people only we could build large fires and stand around them when we were not on active duty. There was only their narrow stream off 150 to 200 yards wide which separated us from the enemy who were strongly entrenched on the opposite bank of the River but there were no picket firing going on and we were permitted to talk to our enemies at our leisure, there force at this place was much stronger then ours, about this time General Joe Hooker taken command of the Army of the Potomac.
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January 20th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
The Yankee Balloon was raised for the first time since the Fredericksburg fight which caused us to suspect that an engagement was soon to take place
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January 21st 1863 WLF diary Co. K
our Quarter Master, having awakened to his Duty and brought in our money we drawn 6 months wages today, besides some of us who have been absent for some time drawn much more I received $156.00 Dollars wages and fifty dollars bounty
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January 25th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
We all having money plenty and nothing to do we spent a great portion of our time in foraging through the country and going to Guinea Station which was our nearest market and in a few days were all out of money
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January 26th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Cannonading was heard very heavy at a distance off. Continual skirmishing was going on among the Cavalry and the Yankees had been selecting a place to lay a Pontoon Bridge which made us think we had something on hand to do, we cooked up Rations but no fight
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February 1863
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February 16th 1863 MC letter camp near Fredericksburg, Va. Co. D
Talley is to pay me to take care of his horse for him
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there is some talk of peace hear now But I don’t believe one word of it I had rather think there would Bee a fight soon then to think there would Bee peace sow much for that
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I will rite a few lines more for the cannons is roaring over on the river and we may have to go there soon to meet them I fear wee will I think the chance is good for a fight for wee have Bin still too long and doing too well
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February 19th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
The snow melted fast. Some rain and mud from zone 7
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February 20th 1863 WLF diary Co. k
We having got tired of cooking out of doors and coming to the conclusion that the best was as good as any, we laid today and built little chimneys to our tents which proved to be a cash piece of work
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February 21st 1863 WLF diary Co. K
All reports from the front were very favorable which kept us in good heart the Yankees kept on their own side of Jordan, very well at present
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February 22nd 1863 WLF diary Co. K
There fell today the deepest snow I ever witnessed at dark. It would average 2 feet deep
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February 22nd 1863 TPF letter Co. E Camp near Fredericksburg, Va.
The boys are generally all well in the Company, Capt Loveless is well and speaks of resigning and going home I think there will be some chances for me when Lieut. Ferguson and Kelly both get back if there is no fight expected. The Yankees are now near all gone from hear some gone to Washington City, and others to Suffolk below Richmond, I do hope they will remain quiet another month as the weather is so bad to think of marching now. The boys are generally all well in the Company, Capt Loveless is well and speaks of resigning and going home. Jessee Berry is well and hearty
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February 23rd 1863 WLF diary Co. K
We had a snow fight with Gen Rodes Brigade 2 of the 19th Ga. got their arms broke, several eyes were put out. The rest of the month we had bad weather and nothing of interest transpired
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March 1863
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March 1st & 2nd 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Beautiful weather over head. The Regt went out on Picket
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March 4th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
I bought a load of sweet cakes and carried to the Regt on picket
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March 6th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
A fine time for sitting around the fire Porching corn and telling lies
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March 8th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
all quiet and peaceable. Both in front and rear
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March 11th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
we draw 2 months wages again today
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March 12th, 13th &14th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Fine weather camps were inspected a monthly report made and Brigade Drills were regular. W.L. Howard returned
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March 17th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
there were a brisk skirmish up the river. The Yankees forced back with heavy loss considering our loss were slight none killed
.
March 20th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Another day of snow
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March 21st 1863 WLF diary Co. K
The Regt on picket. All quiet
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March 26th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Fine weather very much resembled spring. Heavy cannonading was heard a long ways off in the direction of the Ocean the result of which I never learned
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March 27th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
This day was set apart by the President of the Confederate States for past time. Humiliation and prayer. All Military Duty was suspended with an All sermon was preached by Parson Higpen of the 6th Ga. Regt. Hoff our Co, Deserted for the first, since, we went on Thus the Ice was now Broken and Desertion became regular. An evil which could not be broken, here is the names of those four Deserters. G.H. Burnett, James Hix, Isaac Edwards, and N.D. Nicholson
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March 28th 1863 MC letter Camp near Fredericksburg, Va. Co. D
I received a letter from you by the hand of Mr West
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I sent you some money I sent it by Capt Pritchet he started home yesterday
.
Me and Bary and Boswell sent three hundred dollars
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I was vary Glad to see Mr West when he come for he told me a heap that was going on in that Country
.
we are expecting a fight hear the weather brakes up, but I don’t now when that will be for it is raining now and has rained a heap now for a while but it bad on the Yankees as well as us and I am glad of it wee had 3 men leave our right last night with there guns and ammunition and is thought they are gone home But I don’t now whether or not
.
I don’t think I shall ever runaway from this army, but I don’t know what I may do yet, but if I can’t go home honorable, I wont go
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March 28th to 31st 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Bad unsettled weather it was a hard case to keep warm and rations to hand. Nothing of any degree of importance transpired
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February or March 1863 MC Co. D letter undated
Election hasn’t come of yet and I don’t know when it will, but I hope when my friends is all hear, I don’t now how the thing will go, if this gets there before Miles leaves tell him to come on, for wee hate James Readey so bad that we could not stand him much longer and we want him to come on, for some of the boys was mad when he was elected and they throw it up to me for his staying at home for they say they node it when he was pullin, I wont him hear My self for he will Back? Ready
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April 1863
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April 2nd 1863 TPF letter Co. E Camp 23rd Ga. Regt
Before this reaches you Squire Kelly and E.P. Price will have got home
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the 27th of March, being first day we had preaching in Camps, had a very good sermon
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I have been relieved as acting Quarter Master, but am on ____ other detail as Commissary of the Regiment it is now seven months since I have done any duty in the Company and I suppose will be two months longer yet The boys grumble about it but I am doing very well, and Col Best detailed me to act and no one can object to it properly, Col Best is a good friend of mine and I shall endeavor to keep him so.
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Capt Steel will hardly resign as he would be conscripted immediately, Capt. Loveless will resign and go home soon I think I shall then have as good a position as I want in the army that of 1st Lieut.
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April 2nd to 5th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Bad unsettled weather it was a hard case to keep warm and rations to hand. Nothing of any degree of importance transpired
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April 6th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Another snow
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April 8th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Our knapsacks were Branded
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April 9th 1863 MC letter Camp near Fredericksburg, Va. Co. D
We are still at the same plase yet but I don’t now how long we will stay we have some men to run away every night or two there was 4 runaway some 2 weeks ago and two last night out of our Regt not out of our Company I don’t think any of our boys will run off I shant I know unless my notion alters greatly
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We had snow the fifth of this instant that was 6 inches deep and that of it on the Ground yet and you now that it ant warm hear
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April 10th to 13th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
All Quiet
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April 15th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Nothing strange
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April 16th 1863 MC letter Co. D Camp near Fredericksburg, VA
I eat with B.M. and Boswell but sleep by my self in one of the Col tents
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Boswell is well and harty
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April 17th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
The weather now became so intensely cold that sitting by the fire was generally preferable to any kind of duty
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April 19th 1863 MC letter Co. D Camp Near Fredericks burg Va.
B.M. and Boswell is well Boswell has got a sore thumb with fever or something like it they are both on Guard to day
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April 18th to 20th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
All Quiet with the exception of Scourging around the fire
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April 22nd 1863 WLF Diary Co. K
Nothing strange transpired
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April 23rd 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Very strong indications of an early engagement now began to manifest themselves. Couriers were seen sailing at the rate of speed from one head quarters to another. Arms were inspected and fixed in order. 40 Rounds of Ammunition were issued to each and every man
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April 24th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Everything progressed as usual
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April 25th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Capt. Young tendered his Resignation
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April 26th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
All went to Church
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April 26th 1863 MC letter Co. D Camp near Fredericksburg, Va. Co. D
I don’t now what to rite that will interest you I can say that we are at the same plase yet and I don’t now how long wee will stay hear for the weather is drying off vary much and that is the time for Yankees to have at but I don’t think that we will fight hear thou wee may for what I now they made a little dash over hear a few days ago and they had to go back vary fast and I don’t think that they will come back any more soon
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April 28th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Early this morning even before Day the Yankees were crossing the river near Hamilton’s Crossings below Fredericksburg and against 9 o clock they had landed 20 thousand troops, over with their Pontoon Bridges we gave way and let them cross some cannonading was carried on today.
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April 29th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
The Battle so long looked for now opened our Army were all placed in position and by 8 o clock the show was opened. The fight began about Port Royal and ascended up the River. The Yankees were all landing a large force. Below Culpepper near Wilderness Tavern thinking to flank our Army. But we were wide awake as you will soon see. Night left us on the Battle Field
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May 1863
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
Our regiment was with Jackson until we arrived at a certain point on the march when we were left and ordered to deploy as skirmishers, the wagons in the meantime following the movement, deploying as skirmishers some eight feet apart we moved through the woods some half mile or more when we struck Seigls corps. We fell back before the enemy's advance to a place called Catherine's Furnace, where were stacks of pig iron and here we fought quite a while and here Maj. Ballinger and fifty men were captured.
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Modern Day Remnants of Catherine's Furnace at Chancellorsville

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Ruins of the Chancellor House at the Chancellorsville Battlefeild

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Chancellor House, Union HQ, where the 23rd were taken and counted off after their capture

The rest of us were captured soon thereafter; the Yankees in front and on either side, our wagons had passed safely on. The number captured about 250.
The Yankees were very proud and thought Lee was retreating and that we were the rear guard. They took us to Hookers headquarters, the Chancellor House, and proceeded to count us out preparatory to sending us across the river.
When about half done, away to their right was heard a continuos roar of musketry and shells, from Jackson on their right and Longstreet on their left were bursting all about us. I never saw such consternation and confusion.
They were not looking for anything of the kind, and troops for some distance were brought up to stop the stampede and restore order. The cavalry put us across the river as quick as possible and from the river hills we could see where the fighting was on.
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May 2nd & 3rd 1863 From Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia in the words of Col. James H Huggins & Maj. William Barclay
Commanded by Captain Sharp, the regiment was in the Battle of Fredericksburg, but was not closely engaged.
the loss in this fight amounted to only five killed and wounded. Shortly after this Colonel Best returned to the regiment, and was in command at the Battle of Chancellorsville, which was fought May 2nd and 3rd, 1863.
The Twenty-third Georgia was detached from the brigade to protect a wagon train, while the army was making a flank movement.
The enemy discovering our movement, and thinking that it was a retreat of the entire army, ordered General Sickles to make a reconnaissance in force, to discover what our movement really was. He obeyed the order, and at the head of twenty thousand men, marched down upon the devoted Twenty-third.
He maneuvered to capture the wagon train, but after considerable skirmishing, pending which the wagon train escaped, he only succeeded in capturing one hundred ninety men and officers of this regiment.
By thus standing our ground firmly against the outrageously overwhelming numbers of the enemy, we saved the wagon train at the expense of the before enumerated prisoners.
These same were exchanged about three weeks afterward and returned to the regiment.
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May 2nd 1863 War Record of Samuel Tate Hammontree Co. E
I was close to Stonewall Jackson when he fell Captured night he fell
His death cast a gloom over that was hard to endure
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May 3rd 1863 War Record of Samuel Tate Hammontree Co. E
The most terrible days I had were at Chancellorsville. Here we had gone three days without food and I, with many more were captured and marched swiftly to Washington. Many fell out on this trip. When we got there, they gave us three crackers and a small piece of beef for the first meal.
I was kept a prisoner here three days and then sent to Fort Delaware where prisoners were exchanged, I was sent to Fortress Monroe
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May 2nd & 3rd 1863
Following is first hand information from witnesses describing Chancellorsville at Col. E.F. Best’s Court Martial
Chancellorsville
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Capt. J.P. Patton
I was in the Battle of Chancellorsville on the 2nd of May 1862. The accused was the colonel of my Regiment. We were in line of battle in the woods I went to the center of the Regiment from near the left, to see [Colonel Best], and I found him soon afterwards, the Yankees advanced on us and I went to my Company. I saw nothing afterwards of [Colonel Best]until the Regiment had fallen back a half or three quarters of a mile, to the Furnace. There were no other troops with our Regiment. We had him detached to take charge of the wagon train.
The fire of the enemy before we fell back was pretty tolerably heavy, I suppose about one hundred and fifty yards from us. Our Regiment fell back just about the time the Skirmishers on our left got back.
There was no orders to the Regiment to fire, but it had before that been ordered to fire, if the enemy advanced on us. A few men did fire, before we commenced the retreat.
We had none killed or wounded. Afterwards at the Furnace where we established another line we had one killed and two wounded. At the Furnace we had a pretty brisk skirmish. We fought there “a right smart while”. It was I suppose the same force of the enemy, that had advanced on us at first. I saw [Colonel Best] just before we got to the furnace before the enemy, that had advanced on us at first.
I saw [Colonel Best] just before we got to the Furnace before the enemy had opened fire on us again; but I did not see him afterwards during the skirmish at the Furnace. From that place we fell back about a half a mile, to a Rail Road Cut. I know of no order for the movement. The enemy followed us to the rail Road Cut.
Just before the enemy opened on us, I saw the accused in the cut with us. After the enemy had commenced firing again, and about fifteen minutes after I had seen him there, I missed the accused, and saw no more of him for some twenty days. I with all the others who were in the cut were captured.
We kept up our fire about a half hour after I missed the accused from the cut.
Portions of nine Companies of the regiment were captured. The remaining company “C” was detached as skirmishers and was not with the Regiment and hence was not captured. The Lieut. Colonel (Huggins) had been with the Regiment that day.
The Major (Ballenger) had been captured at the Furnace. Capt. Sharp was the senior Captain of the Regiment. He was at the Rail Road Cut . *the firing there commenced
The men were lying down, having orders to do so. I don’t know what orders the Colonel received in taking that portion in the woods. We was ordered there by Genl Stuart.
On the first advance of the enemy, our skirmishers engaged them but very little time, they fell back pretty quick of the regiment then were either four hundred and eighteen or four hundred and eighty captured. And the Company not captured had about forty men present. When the enemy first advanced, I think there were two of the nine Companies deployed as skirmishers.
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Capt. J.J.A. Sharp Co. G
I am and was at the time of the Battle of Chancellorsville, Senior Captain of my Regiment. On the second day of May 1863 about nine or ten o’clock in the morning Major Genl J.E.B. Stuart gave Major Best orders. There was a plank road held by the enemy moving about _______ to a road over which Genl Jackson’s Army Corps (to which we belonged) was firing. These roads were about a mile and a half or possibly two miles apart and there was a neighborhood road extending from the one to the other. The wagon trains of the 2nd Army Corps was passing on the road along which the corps itself was moving.
Genl Stuart ordered Major Best to guard the neighborhood road against any advances of the enemy. He directed him, if the enemy advanced to deploy his Regiment and hold him check, and to send for reinforcements if he needed them. Genl Stuart left with Colonel Best a courier for that purpose and told the accused that there was a Cavalry picket in front of him. The accused, Genl Stuart directed particularly that the command of the accused should not advance but should hold the pass if attacked. Genl Stuart posted our Regiment about a quarter or half mile from the road on which the corps was passing and between that and the plank road.
It was _____, and Genl Stuart said the enemies Cavalry could not charge us, and we could fight there and hold the enemy in check as long as possible.
I heard an order from Colonel Best to take command of the left wing of the Regiment, the Lt. Colonel was not with the Regiment. I soon afterwards saw the accused who came to me and told me if I was pressured mainly to fall back to some point which he said was in my rear that which I had more men and that I should hold the position
.
Some two hours after we had been in position that is sometime about 12 or 1 o’clock in the day, the enemy advanced on us. They had previously were shelling our wagon trains, but I had not advanced. With this exception everything had been very quiet. When the army advanced. I think we had three Companies deployed as skirmishers along the front. After a very little firing from our skirmishers.
I heard an order for retreat. At that time I could see no enemy, and the skirmishers in front of me had not fallen back. There was nothing to make my boys retreat: but I looked and saw the right wing gone. It was a hundred yards ahead of us. The command came along the lines to or that my wing followed and I was told by the Acting Adjutant to come on form on their right wing up on the hill near the Furnace, this was near the road on which the train of wagons was then passing.
As I was moving with the left of the Regiment which was at the time advancing
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the Regiment had reformed. I advanced with the left wing, I could not see the whole line in consequence of the broken character of the ground.
We had skirmished for some time on the left, having advanced about two hundred yards, when on information that the right wing was gone I ordered the left wing to fall back.
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this was in the main road, we having fallen back to it and followed it for some little distance. Major Best directed me to detail ten men and deploy them as skirmishers. I stopped to do this and when I came up with the regiment again it was in a Rail Road Cut which ran across the main road about a half mile in rear of our position was the Furnace. As we fell back the cut was on the right of the road and did not reach quite to it. On the left of the road as we fell back, there was a considerable bank, just in front of us as we were formed in the cut, there was an open space for about a hundred yards, then there was a creek, and the ground near the creek was muddy. The cavalry came up in front. Probably our skirmishers had fired, but none of the men in the cut had fired. The Major and something like half our Regiment had been captured in the skirmish near the Furnace.
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I was second in command when in the cut. I [didn’t] receive any orders for retreat from there. I think there about one hundred and ninety five officers and men captured in the cut. Some of the men went out of the cut, after we had surrendered, that is they escaped. We kept up our fire on the enemy about a quarter or half hour after [that].
.
During the day the Regiment lost but one killed and some four or five wounded. These casualties were received in the skirmish near the Furnace, except one in that case a man was wounded on the left of the cut, I think. The force of the enemy that captured us was I think a Brigade. It was an hour “by sun” or more when we surrendered. We left the force that captured us at the cut.
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When we first took position in the woods at Chancellorsville, in addition to the three Companies deployed as skirmishers, ______ ______ these men six men under command of a Lieutenant sent out on the left flank of the Regiment. Where Lt. Smith Acting Adjutant called to me and told me to form on the right wing, I was with the left wing about two hundred yards or more from the place when the Regiment afterwards reformed near the “Furnace”.
In falling back from the first position, no orders from me to retreat and ____ - _____, the left wing followed the right. I halted them before they got back to the place where the Regiment was formed, that is I halted some of them, and tried to halt them all. I suppose it was two hundred yards or more from the Furnace house to the nearest point of the woods.
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The right wing of the Regiment was on the sides to where the Furnace house and the woods. I only know that the right wing proper was there
.
When Colonel Best ordered me to detail the ten men as skirmishers, he was about two hundred and fifty or three hundred yards from where we had skirmished on the second line we had established. I saw a couple of men leave the cut; on the right, but I saw none leave on the left I gave no orders to any one leaving the cut.
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Lieut. B.B. Moore Co. K
I was in the rail road cut at Chancellorsville, while there I saw a man who I suppose was a courier, approach the Colonel, soon afterwards the Colonel “ran out of the cut” I did not hear the Colonel say anything. The remainder of the Regiment in the cut fought the enemy about a half hour after this and then surrendered.
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At Chancellorsville I saw some men, but very few leave the cut. I gave no orders to them. I was on the right of my Company, and I stopped some of my men who started out.
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Lieut. L.A. Smith Co. I
I was with my Company which was the next Company to the left: and was the extreme left Company after Capt. Sharp’s Company (the left Company) was thrown out as skirmishers.
. I was with my Company through the fight and fell back with it to the lines near the Furnace.
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the Regiment made the stand on the line near the Furnace. I saw the [Colonel] leave the rail - road cut “He ran out” I suppose it was a half hour or longer after that, that we surrendered. The Regiment during this time was firing.
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Capt. W.J. Boston Co. A
we were falling back near a little woods toward the rail road cut. When the enemy first advanced on us, Maj. Ballenger went some fifty yards to the rear, and called to [Colonel Best] and told him the enemy was advancing on our right, and asked him what he should do. I understood the [Colonel] to say, that we should fall back: and Maj. Ballenger extended that order.
.
My Company was either the third or forth, I think the third, from the left of the Regiment. When the order fall back was given, our skirmishers had not come in. When I met the [Major] near the woods as stated, some one asked him what he was going to do. He answered that he was going to take his Regiment to the rear, and that by the nearest way”. I said to him, that that would not do, that it would be shameful. That the wagon train was just on the top of the hill, and we had been put there to guard it, he said that we ought to do it. He asked where we could form, I told him there was plenty of good places to form. He then marched the Regiment into the cut.
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Maj. M. Ballenger
I was Major of the 23rd Geo. Regt. in the Battle of Chancellorsville. The [Colone]l told me that Genl. Stuart had placed the Regiment shown him the position which the Regiment first took; and that his orders was not to bring on an attack, but if the enemy advanced to engage him, and call our army General that might be passing, for support.
After the Regiment had got in position some little time, the [Colonel] came from where he had been near the main road over which our wagon train was passing and when there was some cavalry, and told me to walk back with him to the Furnace and look at a place there we might take if it should become necessary to fall back.
There was some of our Cavalry picket’s in front of our Regiment, and also the skirmishers of our Regiment Our information received from a cavalry picket at that the enemy was forming lines in our front. I sent some to the main road for the [Colonel]. This received came up to where the Regiment was and told me that there was no troops passing the main road at that time – but that the wagon train was passing.
After a while Capt. Glenn reported to me that the enemy was passing nearer our right and over some distance from the right
Our picket’s had been firing on the right, that is our skirmishers. I don’t think a gun had been fired from our line that is our main body.
Some of our skirmishers had fallen back to within some fifteen or twenty paces on our right. I could not see what was going on, on our left, the timber was thick. There was no firing then. When I reported to the [Colonel] he told me to order the Regiment to fall back. I went to a position where I could be heard, and extended the order.
When the [Colonel] told me to to order the Regiment back, he got up and went toward the furnace. When we got back to the main road, a cavalry officer asked the [Colonel] whom I said their if he did not intend to make a fight there that if he did not, the wagon train which is very vulnerable would be lost. The [Colonel] then saw that we would form the Regiment then, and he and I formed it.
The left was then falling back. I think though I was not in charge of it, and the woods were thick so that I could not see what doing there.
After the Regiment was formed there the [Colonel] ordered us to advance in about thirty or forty yards to a fence. We did so. I was captured with forty two officers and men on the right. We had held the enemy’s left in check until our left got out of the woods.
Where the right was, it was open ground, but the greater part of the Regiment was in the woods.
.
Capt. Glenn reported to me that they were flanking us on the right.
My orders were to order the Regiment back in a report from Capt. Glenn that the enemy were passing ______ our right and the creek, but when I got this report, I saw us immediate danger and was not willing to take the ____________ of ordering the Regiment to fall back and hence reported to the [Colonel].
There is no doubt from what I know of the ____ion now, that the enemy would have flanked us, if we had remained, but I seen no immediate danger at that time the distance from our right to the creek was some five or six hundred yards in front of us.
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Serg. Maj. J.E. Covington
I was present at the Battle of Chancellorsville.
The [Colonel] advanced the Regiment from the road by the Furnace, and formed it in line of battle and thru out skirmishers, on the front and flank. Some time after that, the dismounted cavalry reported that the enemy was advancing, and soon afterwards the enemy fired on our right flank, flanking our Regiment.
I heard Maj. Ballenger report to the [Colonel], that the enemy was flanking us. After the Regiment fell back then, the [Colonel] formed it in line of battle and advanced it to the fence, which was about fifty yards. When the Regiment halted the [Colonel] came to me and asked me if I could see the enemy I told him I could see them deploying in a piece of road opposite our right, I was in rear of the right.
The [Colonel] then gave an order to go the wagon train of the Corps and hurry it up. I went some afterwards the [Colonel] came down to the main road where I was, a few men came with him. The [Colonel] ordered the men to advance and give the enemy a flanking fire from where I saw him lay.
They fired a few rounds when we moved them to retire.
They retired, the [Colonel] ordered the men to help get off a caisson that was broken down. The Artillerists abandoned it right off, and the [Colonel] said he would go and get some of the artillerists who had gone over the hill, and come back after the caisson.
When I reached the Rail Road, [Colonel Best] was ordering the men dig holes in the bank with their bayonets so that they could ascend the bank and fire at the enemy. There were troops passing at the time our regiment was first attacked. From the pile of big iron to the right of the Regiment, the hill was rigged stiff.
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Capt. W.G.L. Butt Co. K
While the Regiment was in the rail Road Cut, a courier came in near of us some hundred yards or more, and beckoned something, I could not hear what. The courier came nearer and talked to another man, who afterwards talked to the accused. I did not hear what was said in either case. [Colonel Best] afterwards gave orders for the Regiment to deploy as skirmishers and come out of the cut. [Colonel Best] after giving these orders started out of the cut he went in the direction in which I had seen the courier that is to the rear, a little to the left. At the time [Colonel Best] gave the order he was on the left of the Regiment.
I repeated the order. Some of my Company including myself, two Lieutenants and about ten or twenty men obeyed the order and went out of the cut. The Colors of the Regiment were also brong out of the cut by the color bearer, my Company was Color Company at the time. At the time I left, there was no danger in the rail-road cut. The fire of the enemy upon those who left was I thought very heavy.
The command, as well as I can remember was “to deploy as skirmishers and come out”. My Company was Color Company, and yet was the left _____ companies formed in the cut as they got there, and I suppose my Company happened to be second getting there.
.
When [Colonel Best] gave the order to leave the Cut, I suppose it had then been retired a quarter and a half hour. When leaving the cut [Colonel Best] “run”. Of these who left the cut there was one struck by a spent ball. I mean by saying that the firing was heavy, that there was a great many guns fired in that direction and balls came toward us.
The Colors where they were carried out were rolled, and carried out by the Color bearer, down in his hand, thirty could not see him by the rest of the Regiment; I gave the orders loud enough to be heard by the next Company; but none of that Company came out with me that I know of.
Those who came out with me were of my Company. I think where we were in the cut, my Company had about twenty five maybe thirty men. I think not more then twenty five. I over took [Colonel Best] about a half mile from the cut.
When I came out of the cut, [Colonel Best] was about seventy five yards to the rear. There was some of the men of the Regiment saw him and following him. There were some fifteen or twenty of the Company on my left, who had come out before I had done so. None of the men who came out with me were with [Colonel Best].
I can’t say whether all of the Company to my left went out of the cut. A good many went to the end of the cut, and went back into it. The firing there was pretty heavy.
Before the courier that I have spoken of came up, some ten or fifteen minutes. A man had ridden up and asked [Colonel Best] something about whether he could hold his position. [Colonel Best] replied that he could if his left was supported. The left was not supported, while I was there.
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Lieut. William J. Keown Co. H
I was in the rail-road cut during the Battle of Chancellorsville, After we had been in the cut about a half hour or hour a courier rode up and asked [Colonel Best], if he could hold his position. [Colonel Best] replied, that he could, if he was supported on the left. The courier said he brought his orders from Genl. Archer. I don’t recollect that the courier said anything else.
The left of the command was not supported. After a half hour after the first courier, another courier came and in my hearing that he brought orders from Genl. Archer for [Colonel Best] “to bring his Regiment out of there”.
[Colonel Best] gave orders “to deploy and come out as skirmishers”. [Colonel Best] “then led the way and came out, and what of the Regiment came out, followed.” [Colonel Best] went the rest of his way, and we all did the same.
I came out of the cut at that time. I did not consider that there was any danger in the cut at that time. I thought the fire on us was pretty heavy as we came out of the cut. I don’t suppose the enemy’s skirmishers were more then one hundred and fifty yards in front of us. I thought they were pretty thick.
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The second courier was about two hundred yards to the left and near where he gave the orders. [Colonel Best] went out a little piece to hear the order, and when he heard it, the courier spoke loud enough for us to hear it on the left in the cut.
[Colonel Best] and the men who followed him double quicked out of the cut, and for a distance of about a half a mile from there. My Company was the left Company in the cut. I think there were nine of the men of my Company who came out with me. There were, as able as I recollect, only two of my men who stopped in the cut. The other men and officers of my Company had been captured near the Furnace.
I was there and now a Senior Second Lieutenant. [Colonel Best], myself and three other officers that came out of the cut. I suppose besides these there were some thirty five or forty enlisted men who did so. Most of the men who came out were from the left of the Regiment. They were some five from the center and right.
We had skirmishers on our front, and some of those _
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The cut where we were was some seven or eight feet deep. We had to dig with our bayonets to get footing, so as to fire. I went out of the cut first. I was on the left. [Colonel Best] came out of the cut, the same time with me. [Colonel Best] and myself double quicked off together, Sometimes our was a little ahead, and sometimes the other, the Regiment had not fired from the rail road cat, when we left.
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Lieut. William A. Smith Co. I
I was present with the Regiment near Welford’s Furnace in the action at that place. I was Acting Adjutant of the Regiment. After the Regiment had fallen back to the Furnace and had advanced to the fence, I saw the accused at the Furnace with some Artillery that came into position and fired into the enemy.
After the Regiment fell back to the Furnace and advanced to the fence, [Colonel Best] at the Furnace gave me an order to go to the _ to bring in Company G. which had been deployed then [Colonel Best] then told me to bring the Regiment back there to the rear, that he would form it in a new position.
I could not see the wagon trains at that time. I saw it after we went back to to the Rail Road Cut, I could see the train about a half a mile off entirely out of danger.
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When I saw the wagon train a half a mile off, I was on the top of the hill in rear of the rail road cut.
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Private James W. Justice Co. K
While in the Rail Road cut I saw a courier or man acting as such come up to the cut and communicate with [Colonel Best] I was present. The courier first asked [Colonel Best]if he was the ranking Officer in Command at that place. [Colonel Best] said he did not know, but supposed he was.
The courier then asked [Colonel Best] if he could hold his position. [Colonel Best] replied that he could if he had support on the left. Some half hour afterward, I saw another courier some sixty or more yards to the left and in rear of the Regiment. I heard that Courier bellowed to [Colonel Best] that Genl. Archer directed that he should deploy his men as skirmishers, and take them out of there, that they could hold the point.
A few moments afterwards [Colonel Best] gave an order to “Deploy as skirmishers and come out of there as quick as possible”. [Colonel Best] was on the left when he gave the order, near the left. He then walked up towards the right and repeated the order twice. My Company was, I think the third from the left, and [Colonel Best] went up to where I was on the right of my Company. He also told my Captain to pass the order up the line. When [Colonel Best] started out of the cut, he went toward the left.
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Capt. Butt is my Captain. I came out of the cut. When [Colonel Best] left he went to the left and rear, “[Colonel Best] went like all the men who went out there, Double quicking pretty fast” I was away the last that I noticed go out of the cut.
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Lieut. T.B. Davis Co. A
I was in the Rail Road Cut, in the affair at Chancellorsville, I was about ten or twenty paces from the end of the cut on the left. I don’t think the line of the regiment extended to the left beyond the end or mouth of the cut.
I think I was about ten or twelve paces from the left of the regiment. The enemy fired a volley at our skirmishers The cut did not extend to the right as far as the regiment did. I think some five or six men went out on the right of the cut. The cut was short; and I could see to the end of it toward the right from when I was. The leaving of the cut was more at all a general thing.
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I don’t think there was any full Company, but that there were portions of two Companies to the left of my Company in the Cut, I say there portions of two Companies, because I saw men of two different Companies there, and not enough men to make two Companies.
The Companies to best of my recollection, was K. and H. I think that the left of the regiment extended to the mouth of the cut or very nearly so I could not see the enemy on our left.
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Lieut. T.T. Moss Co. G
. I was in the Rail Road cut at Chancellorsville, I was near the left, some twenty five yards from the left of the Regiment. The left of the Regiment extended to the mouth of the cut, but not beyond it, the Companies were not formed in the Rail Road cut exactly in proper order.
.The position of my Company must have been on the extreme left, as we were I think there were portions of but two Companies in my left.
We went into the cut in some confusion and all the Companies did not get into their proper places. All the men were not with their appropriate Companies. I saw men in my Company and in other Companies who did not belong there. As well as I can remember parts of Companies A,E, and K and G were on my left. Company H was on the right.
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Lieut. S.J. Burdett Co. A
I was in the Rail Road Cut at Chancellorsville, The Companies were mixed up, and I can’t tell how many were to my left. As near as I can remember I was about seventy five yards from the mouth of the cut on the left. I saw the accused leave the cut, He passed by me as he went to the left in going out of the cut.
I heard no orders about leaving the cut, from [Colonel Best]or any body else, nor did I hear of any. When [Colonel Best]left the cut he started out running, He went to the left some twenty five or thirty yards and then turned square to his left, that is to the rear of the Regiment. I saw some few other men go out just after the accused. I don’t recollect seeing any go before him.
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I was orderly Sergeant at Chancellorsville
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Lieut. J.T. Harris Co. F
I was on the left in the rail road cut at Chancellorsville, I think I was about forty yards from the left of the Regiment. As well as I can remember there were parts of three Companies on my left. Some few minutes before the accused left the cut, he passed by me, he was going to the left of the Regiment.
. I saw him leave, I heard no orders from the accused or anyone else about leaving the cut, nor did I hear of any such orders. The accused went out of the cut, and went to the rear. Some men followed him. They were running. They started to go out towards the left but the enemy commenced firing, and they went directly to the rear.
I suppose I saw some fifteen men go out of the cut. I saw none go out before the accused. The men did not go out in any order, nor did they seem to be under the command or control of any body.
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Lieut. M.A. Collins Co. E
At Chancellorsville my Company was the right Company of the Regiment. [Colonel Best] formed us where we fell back to the Furnace.
My Company was deployed as skirmishers. [Colonel Best] ordered it done.
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Lieut. A. Worley Co. E
When at Chancellorsville, Maj. Ballenger gave the orders to fall back, he came to the best of my recollection, from the direction of the “settlemen’s road” that the Regiment was formed across. I think that the left was at the Furnace, Maj. Ballenger rallied the regiment on the right when I was as far as I know, Maj. Ballenger advanced it to the fence. He was on the right of the regiment. when we formed near the former, I don’t remember what Company was on our right. I think my Company was the third from the right.
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I was with my Regiment at Chancellorsville, when it was posted across the neighborhood road. There was I think one, and I think two Companies to the right of mine which was in line. There were two and perhaps more Companies of the Regiment deployed as skirmishers along our front.
The enemy advanced, and our skirmishers fired a few shots, when Major Ballenger gave the orders to retreat. Some hour or so before the retreat commenced, The Regiment had retreated over near the Furnace.. When we got there, [Colonel Best] and Maj. Ballenger formed the Regiment again. After this we were marched up some sixty yards to a fence, and ordered to us down again. This was in the direction of the enemy.
an order down the line to retreat. [Colonel Best] told me and Capt. Ferguson (my Captain) to take our Company to a pile of big iron and commenced firing again
After we had been there some little time, [Colonel Best] called to us “to get out of there”, there was still some of our men on the line firing. Capt. Sharp had formed a portion of the Regiment when Lt. Smith, Acting Adjutant, told him that there was a better place to form further back. About one hundred yards from where we had formed under Capt. Sharp.
I think it must have been two hundred yards or further from where we formed line of battle and skirmished near the Furnace
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Lieut. J.R. Pritchitt Co. I
I was at Chancellorsville, there when our Regiment was in line of battle first, and our skirmishers had been thrown out.
The enemies picket’s had fired a few shots when the accused through Maj. Ballenger ordered it to fall back. I heard [Colonel Best] give the order to Maj. Ballenger and the latter extended it. The Regiment was rallied near the Furnace and then advanced some fifty yards towards the enemy.
My Company was the fourth from the left of the Regiment. The Regiment then fell back to the Rail Road Cut.
We remained there about a half hour before the enemies “picket’s” advanced near ______, and commenced firing. About the time the enemies skirmishers opened fire on our Regiment in the cut, some of our skirmishers (but not of my Regiment) fell back towards us from our left.
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Serg. D.C. Roberts Co. I
.. I was captured at Chancellorsville, I saw [Col Best] at the second line, near the Furnace. At that time I saw him, he commanded the Captain to tell the men to lie down. The enemy was firing on us at that time.
I next saw him, some three or four hundred yards from there, this was in the road between where we were captured and the furnace. He was standing still, ordering some men to be deployed as skirmishers.
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [May 4th 1863]
At Aquia Creek, the night after our capture, we were put upon the steamer Maple Leaf
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May 4th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Both Armies began the morning with renewed vigor and it appeared that both sides were in good earnest and that each one were determined to hold the field or die.
The Dim of the small Arms were not Diminished in the least not even for a moments time from the Dawn of Day until 4 o clock in the evening when the Yankees began to get their eyes wide enough opened to see which side of their Bread was buttered on. And all of a sudden they taken a fright at some thing or another when their lines gave way and a fox in a poultry yard never caused so much kicking and squalling as General Lee caused among the (Heroes) Constituting the army of the Potomac Night Fall.
Pound the Yankees with more commanders then men if possible so soon as the Yankees got out of my way, I went over the Battle Ground, I must confess that I never saw dead men before
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [May 5th 1863]
arrived in Washington about daylight, where we were confined in a large brick building. Soon we were given some bread and a tin cup full of genuine coffee which was very acceptable.
At Fredericksburg, down the river, fighting was going on at the same time, and there a number of Mississippians were captured.
There was with our regiment and the Mississippians captured at Fredericksburg, about five or six hundred in all.
About 10 o'clock Todd, Mrs. Lincoln's brother who was Provo Marshall, came down at the head of a battalion of soldiers and we moved over to the Baltimore and Ohio Depot, put in an enclosure, when they came around to see who would take the oath of allegiance, there was one man, a North Carolinian who agreed to take it, when the men rushed toward him calling coward and traitor, and the Yanks took him out.
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May 5th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
The Yankees having recovered their presence of mind Rallied to Squad of about 150 thousand men and come back fool like to try us again this morning but they soon found that we was what never failed and if every any thing was what never failed and if ever any thing was done just right we paid it to them today. We soon get them to going towards the river. We now paid them up with our artillery and Cavalry and at night we had them hemmed on the Bank of the river and our lines extended from the Rear below the River above them and night alone prevented them from getting the capture of Hooker and his Army for we now had them confronted and their Ammunition was near exhausted and had we known their position we could have captured their hold Army. But we made a very nice to start and it kept cannonading all night
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May 6th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
.. No sooner did the Dawn of Day appeared through the line and made a desperate charge upon our lines but they found that the Southern Boys was awake early as it was and a Courier from the Right Informed us that their attack was a point to call out attention and that they were re crossing the River as fast as they could on their Pontoon Bridges so we pushed forward our Artillery captured the Detachment that covered their retreat. Destroyed two of their Pontoon Bridges and made some close passes at the 3rd we captured many wagons and pieces of Artillery and sent old fighting Sol and the Remainder of his Army clear out of reach and 36 pound Parrot guns and thus ends the great 8 days fight about 2 o clock in the morning.
.. We stood and looked for them as long as they remained in our sight and continued to shell for the next 2 hours when the cannonading ceased and the joyful news spread over the camp that the Battle was over and the Victory was ours there were thousands of cheers and shouts of joy assembled from every Brigade as we moved back across the Bloody Field we all felt thankful to an unseen hand that turned the fatal balls and spared our lives we now felt perfectly contented to return to our camp having been cut for 8 days fighting the most of the time and not eating nor sleeping but very little. We were in a good fix for refreshment for a few days so soon we could get to camp.
Never an Army were crowned with victory it was at this time we having defeated the greatest Army on the Potomac as they turned their selves and forced old Joe Hooker and his Bully Army to seek safety beyond the opposite banks of the Rappahannock River leaving 15 thousand dead on the field. 6 thousand wounded prisoners and 14 thousand unhurt prisoners in our hands making 35 thousand of their Army that had fell into our hands while their wounded uncaptured made no doubt 50 thousand in all while our loss in all was about 16 thousand we had taken 36 pieces of artillery. 50 thousand stand of small arms and many other equipments with blankets. Oil cloths, clothing of all kinds. Together with a large amount of medical Commissary and Ordinance stores.
.. We felt like we done a good weeks work we now loaded our selves with such things we desired and made our way back towards our old camping ground we having at least 20 miles to go along a very muddy road and we not in good plight for traveling were until 12 next day in getting to our camps we went all the way back over the battle Field, mostly Pine woods the leaves being dry the Artillery had fired the woods and burned up thousands of men leaving and their parched bones and entrails to mark the fatal spot on which they fell while many poor fellows were wounded laying in the field had thier eyes burned out their Hair singed off and they were yet alive. (Enough to melt the heart of a Pirate).
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May 7th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
After marching from Daylight until 12 o clock we landed, at camp Colquitt the place where we had been encamped for some considerable time before the fight. We all felt like resting a few days and we were all assured that the Yankees scared so bad that we were in no danger.
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May 8th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
All appeared as calm as at a camp meeting. There were only four officers of the Regt, present. Every man had done just as he choosed
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May 9th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
The detachment had been down to the rail road guarding prisoners came in today
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May 9th 1863 MC letter Camp near Fredericksburg, Va. Co. D
of My Brother being taken prisoner he was taken with all the rest of our Regt they was all taken nearby that wee now the Col got out and Miles and James Lewis, Dick and George Moss
George got his finger shot off he may go home we have had the hardest Battle that we have had at all and the worst of all my brother is gone
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I wont you to rite whether they have ever got that money from John Thomas or not, they wrote to me about it and I wrote them how to get it and I hope they have got it, for I expect they need it vary bad
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we are living vary hard now we get some fine fish hear on the river
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May 10th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
General Thomas J Jackson died today at Guinea Station a depot on the Railroad. His death cast a Gloom over all the Confederacy for a time. But it appeared only to strengthen the determination of his men.
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May 12th to 15th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
All was quiet in camps were well assured that we were soon to leave this section country the Yankees were perfectly mute. Lee was threatening a raid on Washington which caused them to concentrate their forces at that place.
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May 17th 1863 WLF Diary Co. K
Preaching in Camps. Beautiful weather
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May 18th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
There was a General Review by the Commander in Chief every buddy was anxious to see old Bob Lee and his two daughters ride by in their Hack
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May 19th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Very fine weather. Intensely hot for the season.
Health generally good, provisions plenty. Clothing abundant. Duty light. Every man his own officer. “Who would not be a Soldier if he had a half a Chance?” But such times as these are not peculiar to a camp life which can be proven by any Virginia soldier
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May 20th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Orders came to go to N.C. Rations were cooked tents struck. Knapsacks packed and everything made ready for a March
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May 20th 1863 From Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia in the words of Col. James H Huggins & Maj. William Barclay
on or about the 20th of May, we were ordered to Kinston, North Carolina. After staying at Kinston a few weeks, we were ordered back to Richmond to repel a raid of the enemy’s cavalry. Spending a few days at Richmond, the regiment was ordered to Wilmington, North Carolina, where after staying a few weeks, it was ordered to Charleston, South Carolina.
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May 21st 1863 WLF diary Co. K
taken the cars at Guinea Station and rolled out for our place of abode a place unknown to us
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May 22nd 1863 WLF Diary Co. K
Changed cars at Danville Junction
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [May 23rd 1863]
They kept us only about thirty days when we went down the Potomac and met our men at Fortress Monroe, who had come on another steamer and together we came into our lines at City point.
We were the last to be exchanged during the remainder of the war. We officers did very well in Washington and from the men, I heard of no serious complaints. Marching up Pennsylvania Ave., it seemed to us a land of plenty; there were apples, oranges, bananas, everything to eat and in front of the stores, great piles of goods. There was no evidence of rejoicing at the wounding of Gen. Jackson, which was known there almost as soon as in Richmond.

June 1863
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
Returning to Dixie we joined the other regiments of our brigade down about Newbern, N.C., where we stayed some time, but had no fighting.
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June 1st & 2nd 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Heavy details throwing up Breastworks
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June 2nd 1863 MC letter Camp near Kinston, N.C. Co. D
I can say to that B.M. has got back and me and him is living like brothers again he is in tolerable health he don’t look very well, but he ain’t sick
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Boswell is well
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June 7th 1863 SR letter Co. I
as you have heard long before this that we was taken prisoners and trotted around through Yankeedom
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This is a low swampy country and bad water we may all get sick but we are satisfied with the swap yet for they will fight in Virginia and they fight to kill, that is decidedly the worst part of the war according to my experience.
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Dock & Jake didn’t get hurt in this last fight but I haven’t heard a word from Tomy & Martin since the fight I don’t know how they come out this time, Tomy had been badly wounded at Sharpsburg but was well again We don’t draw much to eat from the government but you ought to see the boys grazing round in these swamps gathering huckleberries and anything else that they can find the same as a head of cattle
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Vegetables are coming in now and for the highest kind of prices we can buy a little one dollar a gallon for milk $1.50 per pound for butter $1.50 a doz eggs and everything else in proportion I recon we will perish after a while
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I also hear that Littlefield’s Battalion has been into it and like us all got taken I am sure I don’t want any of them hurt but I think it is time they had done something I saw some of the kinfolks here yesterday the Hardin & Putman boys but they are gone now to take our place in Virginia and let us rest a while I hope, for our boys all look badly since our trip North I don’t think the climate suited them – and some of them are very sick but all the connection is tolerable well so far as I know except Bro John he is sick and has been ever since we left Fort Delaware but he is still able to knock about we sent him to the hospital but he wouldn’t stay Asbery Parks was very sick at Fort Del and was brought on back with us to Petersburg Va. and there left in the hospital and I have not heard a word from him since I fear he will never be well again Nance F was left at Richmond sick but was mending at last account
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We have an order to furlough one man from every 25 present for duty provided there none absent from the company without leave that will take a long time to get any body home giving each one 20 days but it keeps a body in a little heart
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June 4th to 9th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Nothing worth attention took place. Heavy working parties along the river. Falling timber and Erecting Batteries and Co.
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June 10th to 12th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Wet bad weather
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June 13th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
The 23rd went out on advance. Picket for a tower of 10 days. During which time we have a fine time among the fist and fruit but had to keep a close watch for the Enemy as our Cavalry had been engaging them at this place a few days previous to this time
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June 13th 1863 MC letter 23rd Ga. Regt Camp near Kinston, N.C. Co. D
we had bin moving about so that you didn’t know where to rite too
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I am still at my old plase yet
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I don’t think we will have a fight hear soon if Ever wee do there said to bee some Negro troops down there but I don’t now how many there is in all if we get assaulted then we will make them fly up the Creak for I now they cant fight much. the Regt is gone on picket this morning But I did not go they will bee gone some ten days and when B.M. comes back wee will rite along letter to father and Mother
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I rote to them when Mr. Reavs went home
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I can say to you that they have had Dick Moss and George both before Court Martial for Gambling I don’t know what they will do with them yet nor I don’t care what, us and them don’t go sow very well
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June 23rd 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Returned off Picket
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June 24th to 27th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Very wet disagreeable weather
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June 28th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Beautiful Sabbath. 43 persons mostly soldiers were baptized in New River at Kingsborough
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June 29th & 30th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
All quiet
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July 1863
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July 1st 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Still continues to rain almost without ceasing. This was the most confiding spell of wet weather I ever witnessed it remains day and night for 21 days
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July 2nd 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Orders came to go back to Virginia
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July 3rd 1863 WLF diary Co. K
At 10 am we mounted the Iron Horse and were soon traveling and daylight
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July 4th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Found in Weldon N.C. Where we lay over until the 6th as there was a raid of Yankees advancing on this place
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July 6th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Went to Petersburg Va. Camped for the night, met with those paroled from the 52nd, among whom were many of my acquaintances who had been captured at or near Vicksburg
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July 7th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Started to Richmond. The Boiler of the Passenger Train bursted 7 miles from the city we were just behind it and had to march 14 miles and camp. 8th and 9th lay in camp
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July 10th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
All at a dash we mounted the cars
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July 11th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Got to Weldon cooked two days rations and rolled on by Goldsborough and 12 o clock
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July 12th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Found us in the city of Wilmington at the Salt Works regressing ourselves for a while then marched out 5 miles and camped
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July 13th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Marched down the Pike Road 7 miles farther and taken regular at camps
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July 14th to 28th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Remained quiet we had but little Duty to do but had a Combustible time. Sporting on the Beach. As we were near the Ocean. Fish were plenty.
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July 29th to 30th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
No change in affairs
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July 31st 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Moved to Camp Davis 7 miles East of the Citizen Top Sail Inlet
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August 1863
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August 1st to 6th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Nothing worth your attention transpired. Very hot weather. Dull times
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
We were also down below Wilmington with a detachment of men.
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Below Wilmington I was guarding a number of boats brought to this particular place by the planters along the sound to keep their negroes from going to the Yankees, whose gun boats were generally in sight.
One evening we saw a sail ship off some two or three miles acting like it must be hunting for something which it was. Directly we saw a shot from a gun boat to bring it to a halt, when it was by the boat taken away out to sea, its papers examined and put upon its way to Beaufort, S.C., which was in possession of the Yankees and for which place its papers called.
Next morning the ship was again back, found the inlet, and came right up to our post. She was a blockade runner from Baltimore and had aboard a quantity of things scarce in the South. They were hauled to Wilmington, the most successful town in this respect along all our coast. And, by the way the N.C. soldiers were the best clothed of the Southern army
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August 6th 1863 MC letter Camp 23rd Ga. near Writesville, N.C. Co. D
Col Best has bin under arrest our smart Capt has bin trying to Get me back to my company but he hasn’t done that yet and Col Best told me if they did order me back that I could mess with him and that was some consolation to me he thinks he will bee released soon
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I long for the time to come when he will get in Command we are doing vary will we are nearly rite on the Coast 12 miles from Wilmington N.C. and I don’t think wee will have any fighting to do hear soon but I don’t now I think we are to go to S.C. but wee cant go I hope it is all rite
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August 8th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
at 9 am We left for Charleston changed cars that evening at Florence and refreshed ourselves for two hours and then resumed our ride
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August 9th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
At sunrise we landed in Charleston. Lay over until dark and went to James Island
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
We were about Wilmington for sometime, when we were ordered to Florida or to hold ourselves in readiness to go there. We went down as far as Charleston on our way when we disembarked and went into camps on JamesIsland.
We were a little ahead of the time as our mission to Florida was to meet Gen. Seymore who was leaving New York with a large army to invade that state.
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August 10th to 14th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Hot weather. The Bombardment still continues to wax worse and worse
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August 11th 1863 MC letter James Island Charleston S.C. Co. D
we have been moving about some
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I fear that we have got to a bad plase now for we have to fight I now for the pickets is fighting all the time nearly and last night they fought all night and I fear we will have a bad time bee fore we get out of hear
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We got hear night before last wee haven’t done anything since we come hear and I don’t now when wee will all the fighting that is going on is one Morris Island and we go there by Regt and we have to go in the night sow the Yankees cant see us I don’t now when we have to go and when we go wee stay 4 days and nits and fare vary bad
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I can say to you that Charleston is a large plase for wee staid in town one hole day
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August 15th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Firing still kept up slowly
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August 15th 1863 TPF letter Co. E Camp on James Island near Charleston, S.C.
Except occasional Cannonading which may be heard at intervals during the day and night. But little damage I think is being done by either party at this time
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I learn that some 25 or 30 Gunboats are lying off around Morris Island. Forts Sumpter and Moultrie, they are very formidable looking monsters, and can throw shell a great distance, our Battery on Morris Island holds out yet, and is now said to be stronger than when the siege Commenced. An attack may be made at any day
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The health of our Regiment is as good as at any time since we left Virginia.
.
The weather has been very hot since we have been here, but is more pleasant now, a light rain having fell to day, water is not good we get our drinking water from a pump, about one mile from Camps, which is very fair water, our rations are not so good here, as we have been accustomed to, We get Beef instead of Bacon. Rice sometimes instead of flour or meal. The boys charge when they get rice in place of flour or meal We get no flour here, and not much Bacon, But I think we can stand that for the length of time we shall remain here. as I don’t think we will stay here longer than the present siege last
.
the boys with whom I have been for two long years so closely allied, Boys who have borne hardships, toils, and privations by my side, men who would stand up and die with me upon the Battle field if necessary
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August 16th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
A Heavy Cannonade was kept up all day and night by every gun that could be brought in position on either side. There were 1786 cannon shots struck Sumter’s Walls today. Besides a Multitude at other Forts and Batteries Damage comparatively slight
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August 16th 1863 MC letter James Island Charleston S.C. Co. D
I have bin Moving about sow much that your letters could get to me
.
I can say to you that this is a hard old plase wee don’t get much to eat and the weather is so vary warm and the water is bad that it all makes it a hard plase we don’t get letters from the office Register for the Male is sow tight that we cant get
.
we haven’t had nothing to do not in this island, but I don’t now how long we will be in this fix for the Cannons is roaring all the time day and night and they are near us but one another Island from us I Expect we will have to go one that Island soon the most of the firing is one Morris Island and they that is amity bad plase
.
Since I commenst this letter there has come in some fruit and some potatoes and some Coffee from Sas and is being dividing out thou there isn’t many of them and that is something that we don’t have much of
.
Eleven dollars per month
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August 17th to 20th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Hot and Heavy Roared the Cannons. From our Ports and the Enemy’s gun Boats
.
August 21st 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Batteries held their peach at being a day of Humiliation and Prayer
.
August 22nd 1863 WLF diary Co. K
General Gilmore ordered a surrender of our works which was refused
.
August 23rd 1863 WLF diary Co. K
Still continues the Incessant Firing. All non-combatants were ordered from the city
.
August 25th & 26th 1863 WLF diary Co. K
No changes in affairs
.
August 1863 From Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia in the words Col. James H Huggins & Maj. William Barclay
during the time, seeing a tour of eight days in Battery Wagner, which was certainly the most disagreeable duty the members of the Twenty-third had ever before performed.
Some of our best men were lost upon this Island, number not remembered. Upon being relieved, we were placed on board the ill-fated steamer Sumter, which, as we went up the harbor, was fired upon and sunk by our guns at Fort Moultrie; but were fortunately and almost miraculously, we lost no men at all by the accident.
The regiment was at this time commanded by Major Ballenger.
a tour of eight days in Battery Wagner, which was certainly the most disagreeable duty the members of the Twenty-third had ever before performed. Some of our best men were lost upon this Island, number not remembered. Upon being relieved, we were placed on board the ill-fated steamer Sumter, which, as we went up the harbor, was fired upon and sunk by our guns at Fort Moultrie; but were fortunately and almost miraculously, we lost no men at all by the accident. The regiment was at this time commanded by Major Ballenger.
After the evacuation of Morris Island, fifty men of the Twenty-third were detailed for duty in Fort Sumter, where the duties were very onerous upon both officers and men
.
August 31st 1863 From The Civil War Record of Robert
Emmett Lawhon Co. F
.. He was wounded on Morris Island, August 30 1863. Capt. Mitchell being sick at the time, R E Lawhon was acting as Captain. His left leg was shattered by a shell during the bombardment. This leg had to be amputated and calf of the right was terribly torn that it would not heal for years
.. After being wounded, he was sent to the hospital in Charleston, SC, He lay wounded for a couple of hours before receiving any attention whatever. Finally when he and the other wounded were being carried across the water to the hospital, in an old wooden boat, those in charge of the boat, forgot the password and were fired upon from the landing by their own men. The Boat was sunk and R E Lawhon would have drown but not for the heroic efforts of his friend Mr. Tom Rutherford (still living in Cobb County, Ga.) who rescued him and swam ashore, almost losing his own life in the attempt to save his life long friend. In their frantic efforts to gain the shore, Mr. Rutherford repeatedly said to his friend that if he (RE Lawhon) went down to a watery grave, he would go with him.
R E Lawhon lay in the hospital at Charleston nine weeks after which he was sent home
.
July & August 1863 Co. E Record of Events
Company left Kingston, N.C. Jul 1, 63 when we were ordered to Wilmington N.C. Arrived at Wilmington Jul 13, 63, marched to Scott Hill 12 miles from Wilmington, remained till Jul 31, 63 there, then ordered to Camp Davis N.C., remained there till Aug 7, 63 when we were ordered to Charleston S.C. were we arrived Aug 9, 63, from there were ordered to James Island.
Aug 24, 63 ordered to Morris Island, remained there till night of Aug 30, 63. During this time the Company was engaged in skirmish with the enemy, were also under heavy fire from the enemy's Mortar and Land Batteries.
Left on the night of Aug 30, 63 on Board Steamer Sumter which was fired on by mistake from Fort Moultrie and the Boat sunk, many jumped overboard and swam or waded to Fort Sumter
.
July & August 1863 Co. F Record of Events
West Lines James Island SC
.
July & August 1863 Co. H Record of Events James Island SC
Jul 3, 1863 Left Kingston, NC for Richmond Va. arrived there Jul 6, 1863 distance 190 miles.
Jul 11, 63 Left Richmond for Wilmington NC. arrived there Jul 12, 63 distance 247 miles.
Went into Camps near Top Sail Sound 12 miles east of Wilmington Jul 13, 63.
Aug 8th, 63 Left Wilmington NC> for Charleston, SC., arrived at Charleston Aug 9, 63. Went into Camps on James Island same day whole distance traveled by Rail Road 647 miles.
Went on duty on Morris Island Aug 25th 63, remained there 7 days, all the time under fire of the enemy, Company loss 2 men severely and 5 slightly wounded 2 deceased.
Aug 31, 63 got aboard Steamer Sumter, prepatory to returning to camps. While running the channel the Boat was fired upon from Sullivan’s Island (Our own guns) 3 shots out of 25 struck it and immediately sank. The arms and equipages of the Company were principally lost, men barely escaping with three lives were all saved
.
Account of H. S. Fuller, Co. H. writing of this time, from Arkansas after the war and printed in the original Confederate Veteran
“It was not a pleasant change for men who had been marching and fighting with the Army of Northern Virginia to be cooped up on a little sandy island of not more than fifteen or twenty acres of land almost surrounded by a fleet of from fifty to sixty armed vessels carrying guns of the heaviest caliber, pouring their deadly missiles on us, and supported by land batteries of heavy artillery and mortars, to say nothing of their sharpshooters, who were ready and willing to pick us off if we ventured to show a hand above our fortification.
During the day they would knock down so much of our fortications, principally of sand, that it would require almost the entire force at the garrison to repair it through the night.
Our walls were fifteen feet high and from twelve to fourteen feet thick, but their mortar batteries would throw their shells over in our midst doing great damage .
On dark nights the lighted fuses to these shells would look like falling stars, and they would come sometimes in showers as to appear that all the stars were falling at once .
when about a mile and a half from land we came in range of the guns from Fort Moultrie, occupied by the enemy, and in a few moments they knocked our wooden steamboat into splinters, and she went down with a thousand or twelve hundred men on board.
Fortunately, the channel was shallow at this point and the tide was out, which left the upper deck out of water, and we hung on to it though the night, .
Our marine corps came to our relief, and in yawls and barges carried us over to Fort Sumter, landing the last of us about eight o'clock.
.
July & August 1863 Co. I Record of Events
Near Charleston SC 10-20-1863
.

September 1863
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September 1st 1863 MC letter James Island Charleston, S.C. Co. D
I can say to you that I have been in a hard old plase since I rote before and I will tell you something about it wee went over to Morris Island and staid there 7 days and nights and that was the hardest times that ever I had seen in my life But wee did leave over there and when wee started back wee was one the Steam Boat hour Regt and one S.C. Regt and some visiting making about nine hundred of us all and fort Moultrie opened fire one us killed several none of our Regt But I never was so scared in my life I never heard sow much firing in my life for this every body expect to die in a short time
.
I am still with the Col yet But have to do some Duty in company because the Col is not in Command
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September 2nd 1863 letter to newspaper Rome Weekly R.M. Mitchell Capt. Co. C.
Sinking of the Sumter **Casualties in the 23rd Georgia Regt
Camp 23rd Ga. Regiment
.
.. Sept 2d 1863
Ed. Intelligencer:
.. I respectfully apply to you, for room in your widely circulated paper, to inform the friends and relatives of the soldiers of the 23d Georgia regiment, of the casualties of the regiment, from the 23rd to the 31st of August, 1863, it’s stay at Battery Wagner---the affair of the sinking of the steamer Sumter, with the 20th S.C.V. and the 23rd Ga. regiment on board, and that too by, by our own batteries. Not withstanding the Yankees thrown on an average, thirty shells into Wagner, the casualties of the 23rd Ga. were small;
.. Killed – Privates J.P. Cooper, co. C. and J. Dodgen, co. F.
.. Wounded ---Lt. R.E. Lawhorn, of co. F. left leg amputated, and flash wound in the right leg; Privates William Williams co. C, in thigh; R.D. Moss, co. D, in arm; R. Bryan, co. C, in knee; T.M. Byrd, co. G in head; L.H. Wrinkler left arm amputated; E.T Maddox, co. H, thigh severe; W.J. Dean, co. K, in arm.
.. The regiment was relieved on the morning of the 31st ult., and got on the steamer Sumter to go to Fort Johnson. The tide being low they could not go the usual coarse, but steamed off in the direction of Sullivan’s Island. The watch at Moultrie supposing it to be a Yankee Monitor, awakened the gunners, when they opened a spirited fire on the defenseless vessel. Every means possible, were employed to signal to them, both from Fort Sumter and the boat, but they recognized no signal. The third and fourth shots sunk the boat, yet they kept firing until a small boat was sent to tell them who we were. This was about 3 o’clock a.m. The men were panic struck, and leaped off into the water by fifties and hundreds, and it seamed for a while that nearly all would be either killed or drowned, but the cool conduct of Major Ballenger, the commander of the 23rd Ga., and a sand bar on the left of the boat, covered by some four or five feet of water, saved them from a watery grave. But guns, blankets, oil cloths, haversacks, canteens, boots and shoes, and in fact all kinds of clothing, were left upon the rugged waters of the boiling keep.
.. Lieut. Lawhorn is lost to the service. and never did the country lose a more efficient and brave soldier than he.
.
Respectfully,
R.M. Mitchell,
Capt. Co. C. 23rd Ga.
.
September 6th 1863 TPF letter Co. E Sabbath Camp on James Island, S.C.
Some sickness in the company, at least several complaining. Capt Ferguson has had two very severe attack of Colie or Cholera morbis; one last night, that was very bad for two or three hours this morning he is much better. Jessa Berry, Pat Hood and several others are well, we cant have good health here
.
Well the Bombardment still continues
.
yesterday the gun boats, mortars and Land batteries of the enemy kept up a furious fire up on our works at Battery Wagner, also last night, and Considerable firing is going on this morning; Battery Wagner and Fort Sumter yet hold out, but they surely cant stand much if the Yankees continue to bombard them
.
The Yankees come and did demand they surrender Battery Wagner and Fort Sumter, and threatened to Shell the City if they were that surrounded. Gen Beauregard informed him by should not surrender them to him.
.
September 8th 1863 John Barnes Co. B Charleston S.C.
We have just got back from Battery Wagner. There is continual fighting although mostly shelling. We stayed there six days and night. The Yankees are continually throwing shell in there. Their mortars throw shells that vary from two to three hundred pounds. We were relieved there last Sunday night at 12 o'clock and our Regiment and the 20th South Carolina and two other companies got on the boat [C.S. Steamer Sumter]. And about two or three o'clock, our Batteries fired on the boat and the second shot from Fort Moultrie, they hit the boat and soon sunk it. And some threw their guns and everything else [away]. Some were killed and some were drowned. Some waded and swam to Fort Sumter and some swam to land. It was about a half of a mile to Sumter and some stayed and hung to the boat till they got news of the accident and brought small boats and all of our Regiment made their escape. But I doubt now how they all happened to, for it was the most distressing time that ever was. Some of them threw off all of their clothes and came to Fort Sumter with out a rag of clothes and some of them just with their chest and drawers. So nothing more at this time
.
September 21st 1863 MC letter Camp 23rd Ga. Regt James Island, S.C. Co. D
We are having some cool nights hear now and I hope it will stay so I think of it stay cool that we have better health we have some chills hear.
Sergeant Best is lying hear by me now shaking, I think hour Coition is all well, but J.B. Collins he is not rite well, Gravelly is gone to the Hospital, B.M. and Boswell is in good health we haven’t had nothing to do since we come from Fort Wagoner there is some Cannonading going one all the time night and day, there is a great many Negroes hear at work now, so we don’t have much work to do now
.
I am still staying with the Col yet and he is doing very well he is not in command yet, but I think he will be in a few days for it will be better for me when he gets in command
.
September 1863 From Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia in the words of Col. James H Huggins & Maj. William Barclay
after staying a few weeks in Wilmington, North Carolina, it was ordered to Charleston, South Carolina.
Here it spent the winter of 1863
.

October 1863
.
September & October 1863 Co. E Record of Events James Island, S.C.
Company moved with Regt from Camp on East Line to Camp on West Line Sep 10, 63.
moved from Camp on West Line to Camp near Stono River Oct 8, 63, where we are now stationed.
Discipline Fair
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October 6th 1863 MC letter Co. D Camp 23rd Ga Regt James Island S.C.
Sam’l Anderson come back to the Regt yesterday
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November 1863
.
Reminisces of Hugh Barclay
Here we remained three or four weeks and details were made from our regiment to Fort Sumpter and with one of these I went.
To get there we went to Charleston where the sailors in long row boats would take us within one fourth a mile of the fort when they would stop and the boats would rock on the water. The Yankees at that time were firing every five minutes with the regularity of the clock 300 pound shells at an angle of the Fort from MorrisIsland. As soon as the gun fired, the sailors, with all their might, would pull for the landing and it was in a great hurry we got inside.
A number of men were killed first and last right there, being too slow, Inside the fort we went into the casements on the side next to Charleston and where it was about twilight all the time.
About 150 men well armed men were kept in the fort all the time and their principal duty was to put out at night something like ladders with long rounds on the side, next the enemy if so attacked by boats running into these the alarm would be given. We kept our picket but on that side also, while its walls were knocked down, not a gun left, only a huge pile of brick, the enemy never could have taken it with the arms then in use. I was in there one week without any trouble, but the next detail had quite a fight.
The enemy attacked in small boats ran against our ladders and the alarm was given, our men rushed out of the casements and the fight began.
118 of the Yankees were captured and our batteries from Fort Moultrie and James Island having the range the next morning little boats were bobbing up and down all over the water and it was not known how many were killed. It was here all of us had a gill of whiskey every morning, and it was the only whiskey regularly issued I know of during the war.
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November 6th 1863 TPF letter Co. E Camp on James Island, S.C.
We have Just returned from a three days tour of Picket duty, some two miles from our Camp: The Picket line, runs in the direction of Stono River and is the South Boundary of James Island. The Yankees may be seen at some points of the line, Their drums have been heard very distinctly for several Morning and Evenings until this morning no drums could be hear: and the impression is that they may be leaving here
.
the Boys are nearly done their winter quarters. Most of them have split log Cabins Covered with new Pine Boards + Brick Chimneys
.
The weather is fine and warm almost like summer. Capt Ferguson is at Fort Sumter yet with 5 men from our Company. 43 from the Regiment.
The bombardment for the last two days and nights has been very heavy.
I received a telegraphic dispatch from Capt Ferguson saying he and the men from our Regt were all safe, and in fine spirits, I hope he may come out safe. If the siege Continues we will all have to take a tour of duty in the old strong hold
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November 28th 1863 TPF letter Co. E Camp 23rd Ga. Regt.
we go on Picket this morning (Saturday, I am not Compelled to go but Lieut Pool is gone home + Lieut Worley gone to Fort Sumter so I shall go with Pack and stay till to morrow evening Monday I have to attend a Court Martial
.

December 1863
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December 10th 1863 MC letter Co. D Camp 23rd Ga Regt James Island S.C.
Col Best has his hide but we haven’t heard how it went, but I think it will bee all rite
.
B.M. is all rite and is fat and sassy and wants to be remembered by you Boswell is at the hospital and has bin vary bad off but is getting better now I went to see him afew days ago
.
December 17th 1863 GWH diary Co. G
Drilling
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December 18th 1863 GWH diary Co. G
Drilling
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December 19th 1863 GWH diary Co. G
On Guard
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December 20th 1863 GWH diary Co. G
Drilling
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December 21st 1863 GWH diary Co. G
Drilling
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December 22nd 1863 GWH diary Co. G
Drilling
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December 23rd 1863 GWH diary Co. G
Drilling
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December 24th 1863 GWH diary Co. G
Left Decatur for Charleston, S.C.
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December 25th 1863 GWH diary Co. G
On the way to Charleston
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December 26th 1863 GWH diary Co. G
Got to the Regt. on James Island SC
.
December 27th 1863 GWH diary Co. G
On James Island
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December 28th 1863 GWH diary Co. G
On James Island
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December 29th 1863 GWH diary Co. G
On James Island
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December 30th 1863 GWH diary Co. G
On James Island
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December 31st 1863 GWH diary Co. G
On James Island
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November & December 1863 Co. E Record of Events James Island S.C.
Company with Regiment moved from Camp near Brigade Head Quarters Dec 2, 1863 to Camp at Presbyterian Church where the Company is now Stationed.
.

January 1864
.
January 19th 1864 M C Letter Camp 23 Ga. Regt James Island, S.C. Co. D
Col Best was cashiered
.
I don’t now when I will start my furlough, when Cous Miles sends his rep if he sends his and he is going to start in the morning, and there names is Gellos R.J. and G.M. Moss and M.H. West Marick Jones and sergeant Stakes and that is right smart from one company
.
When I do come home I intend to stay some time for Capt Stone said that he could fix me up
.
January 23rd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp, clear and pleasant, light frost, heavy cannonading around
.
January 24th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp, clear and pleasant
.
January 25th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp, clear and pleasant
.
January 26th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Secessionville on fatigue, 5 shells thrown at us but no damage done, clear
.
January 27th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At Pringle on Picket. Orders for each man to have 100 cartridges and then placed in light marching order
.
January 28th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still at Pringle, Cartridges returned all but 40 to the man the order countermanded, clear
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January 29th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp, at preaching at night, firing on Sumpter 24 hours 400 shots during the time, clear
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January 30th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At Pringle on Picket, rain the pm, clear and warm
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January 31st 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still at Pringle on post returned to camp in the pm
.

February 1864
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February 1st 1864 GWH diary Co. G
On Picket on the Stono, cloudy and pleasant
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February 2nd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
On Picket on the Stono in reserve, clear
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February 3rd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to camp from the Picket line, fair and cool
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February 4th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp, Clear and Cool
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February 5th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
On fatigue on the road Charleston, attended preaching, fair and cool
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February 6th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At Camp, fair & cool
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February 7th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp at preaching on inspection, fair
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February 8th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Out on a General review. All the troops on James Island. Gen Beauregard present. Gen Colquitt ordered to cook 2 days rations at 10 o clock at night, fair and pleasant
.
February 9th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp packing up to start to Savannah. the countermanded in the pm and marched to Pringle on the Picket. fair & cool
.
February 10th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Returned to camp about 12 o clock and marched to Savannah Depot then 9 miles to Rantow Station camped about 9 o clock where we lay until morning
.
February 10th 1864 WHS diary Co. I
James Island as we thought for Savannah, but after having remained at the depot a few minutes we received orders to move to Rantowels on the RR 9 miles below
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February 1864 From Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia in the words of Col James H Huggins & Maj William Barclay
When the enemy landed upon John’s Island, who was gradually retiring before them,; but before the brigade to which this regiment belonged, General A.H. Colquitt’s, got into position, they retired without giving battle.
Immediately after this little affair, the regiment with the brigade composed of the Sixth, Nineteenth, Twenty-third, Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth Georgia Regiments, was ordered to report to general Finnegan, who commanded the Floridians, at Olustee in the State of Florida.
.
February 11th 1864 MC Letter Camp 23 Ga. Regt. James Island, S.C. Co. D
the Regt is gone from here down on Johns Island they think they will have a big fight down there to go savannah Ga. and 2 Regt went there. and they had a little brush on that Island
.
we are looking for Boswell the last of this week but I don’t now when he will come Web Mullins told me last night that he was coming, I am looking for orders to hitch up now every minute and I think it will come soon
.
February 11th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Struck the line of march for John’s island arrived there at 4 o clock they opened fire on us we turned on the left in the swamp & formed line of battle & lay all night, fair & cool
.
February 12th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched around the Island, found the enemy had left the Island we then struck the line of march for the Rantow Station camped in an old field, saw Gen Wise clear & pleasant
.
February 13th1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
weather very warm and dry, boys ok, tired, part of the company left on the train at 11 am -______ *find _____ *mill
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February 13th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Rantow got there about 10 o clock cooked rations and rested left bon train at 9 o clock for Savannah Ga. traveled all night
.
February 14th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Arrived at Savannah at 10 o clock where we stayed all day and night
.
February 14th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Rantowles station S.C. Sunday
11 am started this day on the trains bound to Savannah Georgia
.
Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [Feb 14th 1864]
We went to Savannah and from there to the terminus of what was then called the Gulf Railroad. I have forgotten the name of the place.
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February 15th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Savannah Ga. Monday
Arrived here a 1 o clock, now expecting to take the trains for Lake City
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February 15th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Taken the train pm arrived at Valdosta Ga. 9 o clock at night where we stayed until morning, rain
.
February 16th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Struck the line of march for Madison Fl. marched 18 miles camp on the Withly Choochee (Withlacoochee) river
.
February 16th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Valdosta Ga. Tuesday
Arrived last night 11 pm at Valdosta, Lowndes County, took the *rails in for Florida at 7 am this morning and arranged the line about 12 miles distant an hour by sun and camped
.
Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [Feb 16th 1864]
From there we walked 30 miles to Madison, Fla. That first night, camping in the pine woods, as yet almost undisturbed by the hand of man, the reflection from the lights from the camp fires of the whole brigade upon the trees and tree tops were very beautiful.
We boarded a train of flat cars at Madison and went down to Lake City, where a regular old confederate soldier was somewhat of a sight. While yet on the cars, looking up the main street we saw a dandy looking fellow, dressed to kill, riding a fine horse, which was prancing along first on one side of the street and then the other; the rider evidently enjoying himself and just as he stopped to take a survey of the soldiers, as one man, 1000 soldiers gave the rebel yell, when you never saw such running in your life.
The look of surprise as we got a glance of his face and the rapidity with which his horse put out, would have made a very sick man laugh.
.
February 17th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Struck the line of march at 2 o clock am Arrived at Madison Fla. about 11 o clock taken the train for Lake City 60 miles where we stayed all night
.
February 17th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Left camps at 2 am and marched to Madison, Madison County Florida 11 am. Weather very cool. Ladies came out to see us take the train, left about 1 pm, unit brought up at Lake City before night where we struck up camp and remained during the night
.
February 18th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Still at Lake City but expected to go the front soon. Took the train and went down to _____ _____ ______ and camped.
.
February 18th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Taken the train for Olestee (Olustee) Station arrived there about night. Cool
.
February 19th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
Still in camp, ordered to cook three days rations
.
February 19th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp drilling, Skirmish drilling, fair & cool
.
Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [Feb 20th 1864]
With our brigade, Finnegan's and the First Ga. regulars there were about 3500 soldiers in Lake City altogether Seymore landing at Jacksonville, at the head of 10,000 men, had thus far almost uninterrupted marched into the interior on his way to Tallahasse.
Near Lake City is a great lake called Ocean Pond, and around one side of this passed the railroad.
.
We marched out prepared for battle, our left wing reaching the lake, the right extending across the railroad and awaited the coming of the Yankees.
About three o'clock our pickets began firing and soon it was general along the whole line. The Yankees never advanced a foot from their first formation. We charged, broke their lines, captured a battery of six guns and their route began. We followed until dark, capturing and killing many.
. There were a couple of negro regiments with them and they suffered severely. I don't know I killed a man during the war, and I am glad of it, but I know I saved the life of a negro that night. We were moving through the pines in pursuit when we had almost passed a negro whose leg was broken and who was leaning against a tree for support, when a man with me with bayonet fixed was going to pin him to the tree.
Just out from New York these were the cleanest and best equipped soldiers I had ever seen. They even had brushes for their clothes, and their knapsacks were full of good raiment. We captured a whole lot of small arms, any number of good blankets and splendid overcoats, but what they wanted with overcoats I don't know for it was hot enough for me in shirt sleeves.
.
February 20th 1864 From Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia in the words of Col James H Huggins & Maj William Barclay
On the 20th day of February, 1864, we met the enemy at Ocean Pond, and we can truly say “ veni, vidi, vici .”
The battle was long and bloody; but the dash and enthusiasm of our Southern boys could not be resisted.
The Yankees fell into confusion, broke and fled, throwing away guns, knapsacks, accoutrements, and everything which could impede a precipitate retreat.
This was one of the most signal victories that the God of war has ever allowed to perch upon our banners.
The twenty-third Georgia was commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Huggins in this fight, and acquitted itself with honor. loss in this fight was seventy five men out of three hundred.
Very soon after the Battle of Ocean Pond, the regiment, and in fact the whole brigade, was ordered back to Charleston, South Carolina. After remaining but a few days in Charleston, we were ordered to return to Virginia.
The regiment reached Petersburg to Drewry’s Bluff, around the flank of the enemy, with the remainder of the brigade, as an escort to General Beauregard.
The regiment was in the Battle of Drewry’s Bluff on the 16th of May, commanded by Major Ballenger.
The Twenty-third advanced with two other regiments of the brigade, half a mile in front of the main line of our army, and drove the enemy from a thick piece of woods where they had taken position.
We afterwards crossed the road with the other regiments, in the rear of the enemy, and drove them from their breastworks, which they held in front of our men.
The victory over the Federals at this point was complete; but its results were not as great as might have been suspected, for the great advantage we had gained over them was not followed up as it might have been, owing perhaps, or I should say no doubt, to some cause which has not been made public, or which was not known to the army itself.
.
February 20th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Still in camps, about 12 on we formed Line of Battle on right of the RR, Yankees reported advancing and are in a few miles of our line. Remained in line only a few minutes when we were ordered to the front, marched down the RR some 3 or 4 miles and engaged the Yankees on both sides of the RR fought them till night completely routing them, capturing their artillery, driving them 2 or 3 miles, no man killed in Company. Lt Pritchett and 5 or Six men wounded, returned to camps about 12 at night
.
February 20th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched out about 10 o clock & formed Line of Battle where we lay until 2 o clock when we was ordered down the road double quick some 3 miles while the enemy opened their Batteries on us when we filed to the left & charged them & drove a short distant when they taken a stand & fought us bravely for about 3 hours with our men falling in every direction when we routed them & drove them some 3 miles night closing in we halted & returned to camp hunting over the field for our boys but found none, learned they had all been removed our Co. had 14 wounded & 2 killed, Brooke & Bingles killed wounded J Wheeler James & John Henson, James & John Massey, J R Hunnicutt John Shamblee, some slightly & some severely
.
February 20th 1864 War Record of Samuel Tate Hammontree Co. E
One of the fondest memories I have of active warfare was at Ocean Pond in Florida. Here the Yanks had the negroes in front urging them on with drawn bayonets. We routed them, seizing several pieces of artillery, seizing a shining brass piece Iron and threw my legs over it and yelled for joy, then agony for it had been shot so much that it was hot and the skin on my leg was burned crisp.
.
Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [Feb 21st 1864]
Next day a train of cars came down, ran out on the battle field, and the wounded, especially the negroes I fear, were handled with little ceremony. Our loss in this fight was light in the way of killed and wounded, compared with the enemy. Gen. Colquitt was afterwards called the hero of Ocean Pond.
.
February 21st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
In camps, the Yankees falling back last reported, they were 18 miles off this morning, the cavalry captured their hospital with 200 wounded Yankees, received orders this evening to cook two days rations and be ready to move at sun rise
.
February 21st 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp gathering up the wounded, dead & prisoners, fair & cool
.
February 22nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
Started at 7 am + marched down the RR 8 or 10 miles to Sanderson, arrived there about 3 pm and pitched camps, but don’t know whether we will remain here long or not, RR tore up down here. Train run down as far as here with our baggage, remained here all night
.
February 22nd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Struck the line of march in pursuit of the enemy camped at Sanderson Station on the Jackson & Fla. RR. fair & cool
.
February 23rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Left camp at 8 am and marched down the RR and camped at St. Mary’s River, river a very small shed up here
.
February 23rd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Struck the line of march camped on Saint Mary River marched miles, fair & cool
.
February 24th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Left our camps on St. Mary’s at 12 m and marched to Baldwin 10 miles and camped. Yankees reported still falling back towards Jacksonville
.
February 24th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Struck line of march, Balding 10 miles. fair & warm
.
February 25th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Marched back 3 miles to the rear and camped for the night
.
February 25th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Fell back 2 miles
.
February 25th 1864 Hugh W Barclay Co. B letter to the Editor of the Athens Southern Banner, published March 9th 1864
Florida, Feb. 25, 1864
Camp 23rd Ga. Reg. near Baldwin
Mr. Editor:
.. Believing a brief account of the engagement at Ocean Pond would be interesting to your readers, I am induced to write. Colquitt's brigade to which I belong, was in camp at the time near Olustee Station, twelve miles east of Lake City. At about 8 o'clock on the morning of the 12th (sic, 20th) inst., we were informed that the Yankees were advancing. A part of the brigade was immediately ordered to some rifle pits hastily constructed near at hand; the remainder forming line of battle in the open field. In this position we patiently awaited the coming of the foe for an hour, when our General, who is a fair man, concluded to meet halfway, and two regiments the 13th (sic) and 28th Ga. were sent forward, the 23rd Ga. following soon after.
.. These soon opened the fight, when all the troops were brought forward. The enemy's first line in which all the known tribes were represented, negroes included, after some resistance was broken. The fight was now conducted in Indian style, both sides availing themselves of the protection of pine trees of which kind there was plenty. Our men continued to advance, never halting, making in the meantime the woods ring with the terrible rebel yell, and as a negro or a Yankee run from tree to tree muskets enough were generally leveled at them to stop their career.
.. After this manner we drove them about three miles when night put an end to the scene. On the following morning I rode over the field and was surprised to find so many killed, as the fighting had been most altogether a running one. At least two hundred negroes and Yankees lay dead on the field, and as to the captured I have no reliable information, I suppose about three hundred. We captured eight pieces of artillery, thirty four hundred stand of small arms, canteen, oil cloths, knapsacks, watches, & c., any quantity. It was a complete victory. We are now distant from Jacksonville twenty miles, and have just received marching orders. I think we will advance.
H.W.B.
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February 26th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
Left camp and marched to Baldwin took the Jacksonville road and marched down near camp Finnegan and camped, Enemy reported just ahead, we are now some 20 miles below Olustee, weather fine. Some 10 or 11 miles to Jacksonville, all very quiet, very unlike war, Finally
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February 26th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Advanced about 7 miles down the rail road & camped, fair & pleasant
.
Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [Feb 1864]
We stayed about Jacksonville quite a while and enjoyed our rest very much.
.
..... On several occasions at night we would divide into regiments and with those large pine cones oceans would fight battles, and it was a pretty sight. At night a time or two we went to headquarters and listened to patriotic speeches. The orators were confident of success in the end and so were their hearers I do not think I would like to live in Florida, out among the pines and by yourself, the continual moaning of the wind through the tree tops produces a melancholy feeling which is not pleasant. I think it is a good place to repent for your sins, for the mournful sound among the trees and nothing at all to see would certainly invite to self inspection.
.
February 27th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Still in camps this morning, all quiet, no appearance of an Enemy, though they are reported 3 miles in front.
Don’t look much like it here, the day is fine, the sun shines pleasant and bright in the pine forest. Just received news from Lake City that Lt. Pritchett was dead, said he died Thursday night 25th about 10 or 11 pm.
Skirmishing was heard two or three miles to the front, which turned out to be our Cavalry Pickett’s Engaging those of the enemy, which they drove back, and quiet again reigned throughout the camp
.
February 28th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Still in our camps, no sign of Hostilities yet, everything still and quiet. Not a word of news from the enemy to day, but suppose they are entrenched only a short distance in front, but don’t know what our Gen intends to do
.
February 27th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Ordered out to a cut on the rail road to guarard (guard) it, fair
.
February 28th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still on the R road, fair & warm
.
February 29th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still guarding the R road, fair & warm
.
February 29th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
daylight had got up early, no news afloat. 59th AG Vols. came off the train to day, not a word of news to day, weather warm and clear, reported that the Cavalry have been six miles to the front and found no appearance of the Enemy, but suppose that to be a haversack dispatch
.
January and February 1864 Co. A Record of Events
In Baldwin Florida Change of Station from James Island S.C. to John's Island S.C. and then to Savannah, Ga. and to Lake City, Fl. Engaged in Battle, Olustee, Fl. Feb 20th 1864 from there to Baldwin, Fl.
.
January and February 1864 Co. D Record of Events Camp Milton, Fl.
The Company with Regt. Left James Island near Charleston S.C. Feb 9th 64, Marched to Johns Island to meet the Enemy.
Left Johns Island Feb 15th 64 for Savannah, Ga. From Savannah, proceeded by R.R. to Valoosta (Valdosta), Ga. marched from Veloosta Ga. to Madison, Fl. from Madison, Fl. by R.R. to Lake City, Fl. hence to Olustee Station Feb 20th 64. was engaged in the battle of Ocean Pond, Fl. afterward marched to Baldwin, Fl., from Baldwin Fl. to Camp Milton were we are now stationed.
.
January and February 1864 Co. E Record of Events Camp Milton, Fl.
Company left Camps on James Island SC, Feb 10, 1864.
Marched to Johns Island a distance of 12 miles to meet the Enemy, He however retired without giving us battle.
From Johns Island ordered to Savannah Ga. ordered to Lake City Fla. arrived at Lake City Feb 17, 1864, 18th went by Rail Road to Olustee station having traveled a distance of about 300 miles by Rail Road excess-28 miles marched.
on the 20th Feby the Company with the Regiment was engaged in the Battle of ocean pond.
22nd Feb marched to Sanderson.
23rd Feb marched to St. Mary's River Camped for the night,
24th Feb marched to Baldwin Fla. 26th Feb marched to Camp Milton Fla where we are now Stationed.
.
January and February 1864 Co. G Record of Events
Leave Camps James Island SC Feb 10th 64 to Johns Island, from there via Savannah Ga to Olustee Fl. Engaged the Enemy at Ocean Pond Fl. Feb 20th 64 thence to Baldwin, Fl.
.

March 1864
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March 1st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Still in camp, some regiments of Infantry and some Artillery went to the front this morning and soon after we heard Cannonading in front, but it soon ceased. We got orders to be ready to move at any moment, not heard a word of news from the front to day, or from any where else, a dearth for news.
.. Fine weather and a pleasant breeze, a pleasant opening of spring down forth, but making an unpleasant campaign in the prospective, but I hope I can stand it, I have stood worse I guess. All packed and rolled up ready to move, our Cavalry captured some Yankee prisoners down about camp Finnegan this morning, it is thought the Yankees are in no force this side Jacksonville.
.. Unpacked again don’t suppose we will leave so fast. It is said that our Cavalry had a sharp fight with the Enemy below and are driving him back towards Jacksonville, no particulars yet, after night, the troops that made the reconnoiter this morning came in about 2 miles below here they seared up the Yankees, and skirmishing with them drove them beyond Cedar Creek, six miles below, our loss was slight, the troops engaged on our side was the 21st Ga. infantry, 11th S.C. Infantry, and some cavalry + artillery
.
March 1st 1864 GWH diary Co. G
March at the cut on the R road, rain at night
.
March 2nd 1864 WHS Diary Co. I Wednesday
Rained last night, but I slept dry under my new Yankee Fly. Still raining a little. night
Not a word of news to day, report says a fight in N. Ga. is imminent
.
March 2nd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At the cut on the R road, rain
.
March 3rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Cold this morning, not a word of news from any front
.
March 4th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At the cut on the R road, rain at night unwell today
.
March 4th1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
Artillery firing heard in the direction of Jacksonville, suppose from Fields Div
.
March 5th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
No news to day, rained last night
.
March 5th1864 GWH diary Co. G
At the cut on the R road ordered to cook three days rations after night & be ready to move at a minuet warning, fair & pleasant
.
March 6th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Got orders last night to be ready to move to meet the enemy at any moment, but as yet no more has taken place.
No news from the front this morning
.
March 6th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At the cut in the R road, fair & cool
.
March 7th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
Went on Pickett last night with Capt Boston Lt. Harris & 50 men, deployed a mile on the RR very cold, no news to day. Gens. Taliaferro & Gardner left on Special train for their respective Commands.
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March 7th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At the cut in the R road, fair & pleasant
.
March 8th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
All quiet, 17th Ga. Band Serenaded Gens Colquitt & Beauregard last night., each made speeches
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March 8th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At the cut in the R road, fair & cool
.
March 9th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
All quiet no news, moved to Baldwin 7 miles to the rear of our camps near camp Finnegan, for the purpose of throwing up Breastworks, around Baldwin
.
March 9th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched back to Balding, rain with wind & thunder all night
.
March 10th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Rained last night, and still continues, no work to day, very heavy and continued rain with sharp lightning and thunder
.
March 10th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At Balding heavy rain & thunder all day the water ways leg deep
.
March 11th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
Still blowing and raining this morning, Regt worked after 12 m to day, the rain having ceased now a chill to day
.
March 11th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
On fatigue loading and unloading cars, fair & warm
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March 12th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Last night J.W. Underwood went off with several others of the Regt, suppose to have deserted, the right wing of the Regt went on fatigue at 7 am
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March 12th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
On fatigue building Breastworks, fair & warm
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March 13th WHS diary Co. I Sunday
All quiet no news to day, weather warm
.
March 13th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
On fatigue throwing up Breastworks, fair & warm
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March 14th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
In the trenches, no news to day, general impression that we will be sent to the Army of Tenn. at an early day. think it very likely myself.
Capt went to look for Deer and fell in the creek & lost his Spencer rifle
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March 14th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
On fatigue building Breastworks, rain at night
.
March 14th 1864 TPF letter Co. E Camp at Baldwin, Fl.
I wrote Mother a few days since, by Mr Glenn. I do not expect he has gone yet, as a portion of the Rail Road between Lake City and Madison has been washed away
.
Everything continues to be quiet in front. Don’t hear anything from the Yankees reliable. We have been here several days working on fortifications. We expect to return to the Brigade soon
.
Their Camp is six or seven miles from here. Seven deserted from Capt Glenn’s Company one night last week. Seven men from our Company three nights ago. two of the Crows, two Corbins one Neil + John Agan + Jessee Cox.
Efforts are being made to catch them I hope they will be caught and an example made of them by shooting.
.
Weather is very nice now, only days are very warm for the season
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March 15th 1864 TPF letter Co. E
Capt Ferguson left yesterday for Ga on business, will no doubt reach home before you receive this. He will carry his trunk home and some things of mine
.
Capt is gone to try to catch those deserters
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March 15th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Went to get the Capt gun out of the creek, but failed to get it, seen two Deer, and killed one squirrel
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March 15th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
On fatigue building Breastworks, fair & cool
.
March 16th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Working on Breastworks, cold windy weather, got new pair of shoes
March 16th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
On fatigue until 12 o clock then cooked 3 days rations
.
March 17th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
no news Regt on fatigue
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March 17th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to the Saint Mary River, crossed over into ______ taken 4 deserters
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March 18th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
Moved back to our camps near Camp Finnegan, to day on the south side of the RR
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March 18th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Taken 3 deserters
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March 19th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
_____ by Gen Beauregard *recd the *inst _____ Atlanta Confederacy to day
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March 19th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Taken one Union man the home of Power the weather fair & pleasant
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March 20th1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
No news, all quiet
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March 20th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Left the Thomas settlement marched to Ortman 6 miles this being in Charlton County Ga.
.
March 21st WHS diary Co. I Monday
Drilling to day, no news, dull times, threatening rain, Rained
.
March 21st 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Mr. Hogge hunting men all night it raining heavy & with lightning and thunder gathering
.
March 22nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Rained all night last night very hard; camps afloat this morning going to move to a dry camp.
No train nor mail to day. Our new camp is dry. no news to day, still cloudy at night and a good prospect for more rain
.
March 22nd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Hunting men in Fla. at night
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March 23rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Cleaned up this morning
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March 23rd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched from Esq. Coward down the right to cross the river stayed all night
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March 24th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
All quiet, Cloudy again. Prospect for more rain no news to day
.
March 24th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched back to Esq. Coward hunting deserters near all night, rain after night very hard & cold
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March 25th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
Rained last night, but cleared to day, very warm, had not a particle of news from the Enemy in front. Drills ordered every day = most detestably dull, I believe I will die with Ennui, if I don’t kill time, time will kill me, so here goes for a game of =
Capt Patton received a letter from private Jim Underwood, the deserter, he is at Savannah in prison, poor fellow, he prays mercy
.
March 25th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched To Mr. Henry’s stayed all night we had to ford the Saint Mary river, fair & cold. The water up
.
March 26th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Officers Brig Guard to day, weather fine and warm no news, dull times countersign – Memphis
.
March 26th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Sanderson taken the train to Balding stayed all night
.
March 26th 1864 MC Letter Camp Milton Fl. Co. D
we think we will go to Dolton soon, but I don’t now we are living hard heard hear now and has a heap of duty to do and Rations is vary scarce and the weather is vary hot in the day time and the nights is cool
.
I expect if you was to write to me you would be like Mrs. G.W. Moss wrote to him you would write that you did not wont me to ever be in another fight she wrote to him to come home and quit fighting but there is one thing that I am glad of, that is you have more sense than to write that sort of stuff and expose everything like she has, Griffin gone and she keeps writing to him and you may now who gets them, all of us, and we read them
.
I loaned Lt. M.A. one hundred dollars that he will pay when he draws
.
March 27th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Came off Guard this morning – preaching to day by 27th Ga. Chaplain at Dress Parade yesterday evening an order read allowing furloughs, hope I will be favored by an offer of one, so mote it be = no news
.
March 27th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Trail Ridge about 15 miles came up with Capt. Sharp & his squad, fair & warm
.
March 28th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Whiteville & Middleburg, stayed all night at Whiteville, rain at night
.
March 28th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
R.T. Fuller + A.J. Smith left this evening on furlough for Rome, + RBC Fuller to Savanah after desertion
.
March 29th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Rained last night
.
March 29th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Left Whiteville, taken dinner at Wilson & passed a Yankee taken up three men at night
.
March 30th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
No news to day quiet & dull
.
March 30th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Stark to Capt. Sharp, fair & cool. Stark is on the Fla. RR
.
March 31st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
In status quo
.
March 31st 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Taken the train to Balding with 1 prisoner
.

April 1864
.
April 1st 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp writing letters, very windy
.
April 1st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
W.E. Freeman left for home on furlough Saturday
.
April 2nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
No news dull, Col E.F. Best came in from Richmond tonight
.
April 2nd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp, very cool & windy
.
April 3rd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched from Balding to Regt. about 8 miles below, fair & cool
.
April 4th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp, rain
.
April 4th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
J.N. Underwood came in last evening under guard, cloudy
.
April 5th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
On fatigue
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April 5th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
W.J. Hefley came in from hospital at Savannah
.
April 6th 1864 TPF letter Co. E Camp Milton Fl.
The order for furloughs has been Countermanded for the present
.
April 6th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp inspection
.
April 6th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Sgt A.F. Smith come from Lake City where he had been since Ocean Pond waiting on the wounds
.
April 7th 1864 MC Letter Camp 23 Ga. Regt camp Milton, Fl. Co. D
I don’t think we will have to fight any more now how
.
I can say to you that G.W. Moss and Merick Jones and Don Caron has got back to this plase they was taken up near Atlanta Ga. and brought back hear under guard and they are under guard now and they ant aloud to go to the Company now way nor they don’t allow any body to talk to them nor them talking to anybody
.
Col Best he hear now but I don’t now what he has done for I haven’t had the chance of talking with him none
.
April 7th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Balding
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April 8th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Trail Ridge elected 3 Sert, some rain
.
April 9th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At Trail Ridge went to Carters at night, rain
.
April 10th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At Trail Ridge
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April 11th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At Trail Ridge
.
April 12th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Warm, Prisoners sent off to day
.
April 12th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Mr. Brantley’s who gave the boys a candy party
.
April 13th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Brown & Saint John River Clay County
.
April 14th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Had orders last night to cook three days rations & be ready to move at any moment, but no orders came for us to march
Capt Patton + Lt. J.A. Smith joined the M E Church tonight
.
April 14th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At Green Cove Springs on St. John River taken 1 deserter & one who set deserter over the river to go to the Yankees, rain in the evening
.
April 14th 1864 TPF letter Co. E Camp Milton Fl
Everything remains quiet on the front lines, Yankee deserters are coming in almost every day, two came in yesterday. Last night our Regiment received orders to cook three days rations and be ready to move at moments notice.
The rations are Cooked and every one ready. Don’t know when it is to go, nor whether we will go or not such orders are not uncommon in the army
.
I am glad to learn that Capt Glenn is doing well . Hope he may be sufficiently recovered to rejoin his Command. Shall expect Capt Ferguson in ten or fifteen days
.
April 15th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched from Mr. Righ to Cooper taken Johnson at night, a deserter, some rain
.
April 16th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Capt Patton + Lt. Smith were baptized yesterday by immersion, right wing of the Regt. had orders last night to go to the front, marched to Camp Finnegan by midnight, this morning came on four or five miles farther and are now on extreme front, but all quiet
.
April 16th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At Cooper & drew, fair & pleasant
.
April 17th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
all quiet no news went on piquet to the Double Bridge.
Kings Ferry road, can see the
.
April 17th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Hamnet with Lieut Brook, fair & cool
.
April 18th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Wally up in the Senib Putnam County
.
April 19th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Found a pen of Com near Wall House in his _____ which he could not claim so we taken marched ti ***rton & stayed all night
.
April 20th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Mr. Brantley’s who gave the boys a party, I stayed at Mr. Sander, fair & cool
.
April 21st 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Stark left Sander, at one o clock left Sander about 10, taken the train for Balding where we joined the Co. & taken the train for Madison traveling all night
.
April 22nd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Arrived at Madison 7 o clock in the morning Marched out some 3 miles & camp
.
April 23rd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Quitman Ga. taken 2 Yankee deserters, rain at night
.
April 24th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Hunting Yankee deserters some 10 miles from Quitman
.
April 25th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At Quitman waiting for transportation, fair & warm
.
April 26th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still lying at Quitman
.
April 27th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still at Quitman Georgia
.
April 28th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Left Quitman 2 o clock for Savannah Ga. in charge of 12 prisoners, arrived at Savannah at 4 o clock pm, hard rain
.
April 29th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
Orders inferred have been countermanded, the 19th thru 28th had gone as far as Florence, but were brought back. We were ordered to Ft. Johnson yesterday evening, and this morning went the camps of the 7th Voll S.C., Hagoods Brig gone to N.C.
.
April 29th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Taken the train for Charleston, fair
.
April 30th1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp, James Island SC, fair
.
March & April 1864 Co. E Record of Events Near Fort Johnson SC
Company marched from Camp Milton Fl on Apr 19, 64 marched to #9 Station on the Aa Rail Road a distance of about 80 miles.
From #9 came by Rail Road to Savannah, Ga. From Savannah by Rail Road to Charleston SC and marched from St. Andrews Depot to Camp near Fort Johnson where we are now Stationed.
.
March & April 1864 Co. H Record of Events James Island SC
Left Camp Milton Fl Apr 19th 64 marched in four and a half days to Tebeauville, Ga. distance 80 miles. Came by Rail Road to Savannah 96 miles and thence to Charleston SC. distance 104 miles. Arrived at Charleston Apr 25, 64 and on Apr 28, 64 went into camps on James Island. whole distance traveled 280 miles.
R B Neal Captain
.
March & April 1864 Co. K Record of Events James Island SC
Left camp Milton Fl Apr 18th 64 and marched to Tebeauville, Ga. distance 80 miles from thence by rail to Charleston, arriving at James Island SC. Apr 28th 64
.

May 1864
.
May 1st 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Drawing clothes on Post at fort Johnson, rain at night
.
May 2nd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp drawing clothes, fair
.
May 3rd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp, fair
.
May 4th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp, fair & cool, order to be ready to march at a minute warning
.
May 5th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At Fort Johnson on guard 24 hours, fair & cool
.
May 6th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Came off guard at Fort Johnson, fair
.
May 7th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At camp ordered to ready to move, fair
.
May 8th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Left fort Johnson yesterday morning for the Steamer and came to N E Depot brought up Regt took the cars for Wilmington at 12 m I with several others did not get on and will have to wait till 12 m tomorrow Camped
.
May 8th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Taken the boat at fort Johnson for Charleston then take the train for Wilmington NC, fair
.
May 9th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
Left Charleston at 12 m yesterday and arrived at Wilmington at 9 o clock this morning where we come up with our companies of our Regt. E & H left Wilmington at 11 am and arrived at Goldsboro, at dark
.
May 9th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Monday we arrived at Wilmington NC 6 o clock pm, fair & warm
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May 10th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Lay over here last night 13 miles from Goldsboro Wilson on account of no water for the Engine
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May 10th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Left Wilmington for Weldon found the road on fire stopped and repaired it & went on
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May 11th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Left Wilson at 10 am arrived at Weldon at 2 pm left Weldon at 4 pm and stopped at the burned bridge, stayed all night and cooked rations
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May 11th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Got to Weldon got off the train at a little station beyond Weldon & marched to Stoney Creek & taken train for Petersburg, fair
.
May 12th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Marched 5 miles to stony creek took the cars and went to Petersburg by 4 pm, drew rations and marched out 2 miles on Richmond turn pike where we found the Regt in ditches on the front line
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May 12th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched out 2 miles ______, rain
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May 13th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
Remained in the ditches last night with a detail of men, the Regt went back to the woods
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May 13th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched to Drewry’s Bluff, Marched through the enemy lines. Gen Beauregard along, Rain & very windy, got there one hour before day
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May 14th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Left Petersburg yesterday evening and marched towards Drurys bluff, having a slight skirmish at Chester C H to clear the way after night, this morning towards evening the firing ceased altogether
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May 14th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched out to support some batteries. We was shelled very heavy double quick out & moved around on the right, rain
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May 15th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
At the Breastworks still fighting on our ______
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May 16th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
No firing scarcely last night, at 8 am this morning we were aroused from sleep and marched towards our left and took position near the pike in the rear of the works as supportive line.
.. The firing already begun _____ _____ prisoners taken were alive in the enemy’s works, after sun up we were alone still farther to the left and _____ to the Yankees works _____ _____, but were on the Enemy’s right which had been _____ Even by Gen Iverson, soon our Brigade was marched against the Enemy’s works where we took and held, the firing was terrible, but few men killed after we had taken their works, _____ __ _____ most fighting was done that day
.
Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [May 16 1864]
We were ordered to Virginia in haste and arrived just in time to prevent Beast Butler, who had landed at the head of a considerable army, from cutting the railroad between Petersburg and Richmond, our only connection from the South with the latter city. We skirmished around a few days with the troops of Butler, and finally getting in between him and the river, turned his right wing and started him on the run. We never let him stop until cooped up between the James and Appomattox rivers under cover of his gunboats.
.
In this battle, Drewerys Bluff, we lost quite a number of men. The Yankees at one place had wire stretched in front of their works, and charging, a number of our men fell there and quite a number were killed.
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May 16th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Left at 4 o clock am & moved round on the left our brigade being in reserve about one hour by sun we was ordered round on the extreme left some 5 miles (double quick) Come to the battle ground where we passed over the dead & wounded, some near ****** **** when we charged the Yanks & fought & drove them before us for 2 or 3 miles, them ordering us to surrender & our men ordering them to surrender, we fought until about 1 o clock then went into the breastwork. Serg. Bell killed, Wounded Joseph Garrett WR Wilson A***** Shamblee, men moved around in the left in the works at night. Our Co. was sent out on skirmish where we lay all night very much fatigued, some rain in the evening
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May 17th1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Ascertained this morning that during the night the Enemy had fell back some miles to his fortification.
.. Moved up and took position in his front skirmishing heavy during the evening and night, our Brigade scattered on the pike as reserves
.
May 17th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still pursuing the enemy some fighting in front
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May 18th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Skirmishing on the front all day no general engagement, our Brig still on the pike
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May 18th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Guarding the turn pike road fighting on the front line, rain. **** double quick *******
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May 19th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Early this morning our batteries opened a heavy cannonade on the Enemy’s position which he did not reply to, a few picket guns this morning, not marching during the day. At dusk we were moved down to the works remaining till night, picket’s had two or three little fights during the night.
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May 19th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
On the Turnpike road until night then marched out to the breastworks & lay all night, fair & warm
.
May 20th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
Considerable firing to day, our troops advanced our line some distance, the Yankees contending very stubbornly for the ground, our line however established are a line of ditches thrown up during the night, our Brigade was in reserve.
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May 20th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched back to the road & lay until 3 o clock when we marched back to the works & lay all night
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May 21st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Very little firing to day, moved out to the front this evening on extreme left, Gunboats on the river near by
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May 21st 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Lay at the works until about 4 o clock then ordered to the front works, fair & warm
.
May 22nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Gunboats threw some shells at our line to day, in the evening moved to extreme right.
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May 22nd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Marched 6 miles down on the right in the pm, some rain & warm
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May 23rd WHS diary Co. I Monday
No firing except occasional pickets, hot still on the right front
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May 23rd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
lay on the road until night then moved out behind the breastwork, fair & warm
.
May 24th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still lying behind the breastworks, rain at night
.
May 25th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still in the works
.
May 26th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Enemy made a show of advance on our right flank but soon retired, all quiet now again
.
May 26th1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still in the works, rain at night Lay in the works until one o clock when we was run out on the right to meet the Yanks, but they did not meet us, very heavy rain, we came back to the works at night
.
May 27th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still at the breastworks, the enemy reported advancing on the right, fair & warm
.
May 28th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still at the breastworks, quiet, fair & cool
.
May 29th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still at the breastwork
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May 30th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Monday, still at the works, heavy cannonading at 5 pm. Orders to march at a minuet warning, fair & cool
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May 31st 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Struck the line of march for Richmond arrived at Richmond 10 o clock, marched 14 miles to Cold Harbor arrived there about night, our Co. being ordered on the left to support some batteries where they shelled us very heavy, fair & hot
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May 31st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
.. Left our position on the Appomattox this morning 3 o clock marched to Chester Station, took the cars for Richmond arrived there in the early of this day, marched out the Mechanicsville pike several miles, then by Gains Mills to cold harbor, where we arrived about dark.
.. The Cavalry under Fitz Lee had been fighting the enemy and were giving back, our div. formed on the same ground which it did nearly two years ago, when we fought McClellan but facing in the opposite direction, we did not become engaged that night and by morning we had a small Earthworks erected
.

June 1864
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June 1st to 3rd 1864 From Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia in the words of Col James H Huggins & Maj William Barclay
The next move of the regiment was to Cold Harbor, where on the 1st and 3rd days of June it nobly repulsed the desperate charges of the enemy, inflicting the most severe punishment on the drunken ramble of Grant.
The ground was literally covered with the slain of the enemy, with a very trifling loss on our part.
The regiment was here commanded by Major Ballenger.
This was the second time this command had met the enemy upon the field of Cold Harbor, and the position of the Twenty-third was nearly identical with that it occupied two years before, about the 27th or 28th of June, 1862.
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June 1st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
.. In the morning all was tolerably still and we were engaged in improving our position, in front of which was a large field, in the afternoon however things began to take a more interesting feature, our scouts on the far edge of the field were driven in and the Enemy’s Batteries began a furious fire on us which however did little injury, soon their skirmishers were seen advancing, our skirmishers were driven on to the main line and their line was seen to advance into the opposite of the field and to descend into a ravine, which was 6 or 7 hundred yards in front of our left, but gradually inclined into our line, finally crossing it on our right, line after line, thus came into the ravine, massing and screening from our fire, soon after they emerged from their concealment, advancing at a run across the open field towards our line, while our cannon sent charge after charge of canister into their ranks, and the Infantry made their Enfield’s crack again and their ranks melted beneath so terrible a fire, but others were in readiness to follow so soon as we had dispatched one line, another came up which we treated in like manner, several times this was repeated and as often as they came we repulsed them, towards night a portion of Clingman’s Brig on the left of ours gave way and the Enemy came into possession of our works, and *passing them was on our left and rear but the 27th & 28th Ga. were ordered to the left and by dark had regained what was lost after a very severe fight in which they suffered severely.
.. night closed on a bloody scene, the Enemy’s dead lay in front of our works by hundreds, our loss was merely nominal in the works, our Co. was with the 27th + 28th in the fight on the left, J.T. Roberts had his arm badly shot during the night.
.. The Enemy had succeeded in throwing up a line of trenches across the field 4 or 5 hundred yards from our works
.
June 1st 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Lay in the ditches & building our works, fighting on the left near all day & night
.
June 2nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
.. To day sharp firing has been kept up from the trenches on each side the Enemy is improving his Ditch and we annoy him as much as possible. R.L. Corbin was killed to day, shot through the body.
.. considerable firing was heard farther up on our left, which turned out to be Gen Ewell driving back their right wing and capturing a good many prisoners
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June 2nd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still laying in the works & fighting a long the line occasionally, rain at night
.
June 3rd 1864 GWH diary Co. G
The enemy advanced on us at day light 3 column deep, we fought them 3 hours cuting them down at a dreadful rate killing one or more of them to one of our men & we lost but one killed in our Regt. one slightly wounded in our Co. T Hunt the charge of our lines for miles & some place they charge our lines severely times with heavy loss
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June 3rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
This morning early the Enemy began to show Symptoms of making another assault, sure enough they came on us again, the attack beginning on our Brigade, but soon extending along the whole length of our line, we repulsed them each charge on a bloodier field then on Wednesday, R.H. Cousins was killed shot in the head.
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June 4th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
morning brought the incessant crack of sharp shooters Rifle during the night. The Enemy have moved up nearer and dug a ditch, which is not more then 256 yards from our own, some cannonading this morning on both sides but do not think it amounted to much. Capt Gratton was shot in the knee this morning
.. nothing occurred to day of note, Sharpshooters kept busy all day, one man killed in Co. F, our lines remain the same
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June 4th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still lying in the breastworks, cloudy & some rain, lightning occasionally
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June 5th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Sharp shooting all day, just after night an alarm took place and a few rounds were fired by the line, but not amounting to much
Corpl Morris very seriously wounded in the head
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June 5th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still lying in the works short firing after night, warm & damp
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June 6th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
Nothing unusual occurred to day, Samm’l Sexton was killed in Co. K, this morning by sharpshooters from 8 to 10 at night Hostilities were suspended, to allow the Enemy to bury their dead which remained between their lines + ours and were smelling very disagreeable
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June 6th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still in the works sharp shooting
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June 7th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Sharp shooting continues in the evening another flag of truce was sent in and Hostilities ceased, the Enemy again engaged in burying their dead, the men on both sides took this opportunity of taking a good view of each other from the ditches on each side which near enough to afford a minute inspection, many men met between the lines, exchanging papers etc.
.. Three lines of Battle were visible in our front, all protected by ditches. after dark, we were relieved in the trenches by Cooks Brig. Heth’s Div having been seven days and nights in the ditches, and sustaining and repulsing two series of assaults on different days. we were marched back to the rear on the creek a few hundred yds below Gains Mills and lay down to take the rest and sleep which we so much needed
.
Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [Mar 31st to June 12th 1864]
At last Grant within a few miles of Richmond at Cold Harbor could see the spires of the city, concluded he would go in and here he tried it, which was the second bloody battle of this name and pretty much on the same ground. Six columns deep they charged our men who were behind breastworks, and charge after charge they made.
.. At last it is said, his men refused to go. The slaughter was terrible, you could walk on the dead and the stench was intolerable.
..Our men sent in a flag of truce that the dead might be buried, and I don't know but what they helped to do the job.
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June 7th 1864 GWH diary Co. G
Still in the works sharp shooting & received a wound in the left arm, the ball passing through my arm near the elbow, bleeding until I was unable to walk or set up, carried to Richmond
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June 8th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Still resting, lines quiet no news from any quarter. except Hunters occupation of the upper valley
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June 9th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
lines quiet no news, slight sharp shooting continues most of the time
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June 10th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
had orders last night to be in readiness to move, but we are still here this morning, but still expecting to march somewhere, did not leave however till night, and then we went to our former position on front
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June 11th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
all quiet as usual some sharp shooting
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June 12th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
very quiet to day
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June 13th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
got up this morning and discovered that the Yankees had gone from our front, sent out skirmishers a mile but saw no Enemy, their works were formidable in our front six lines of ditches moved back across the Chickahominy crossing above McClellan’s Brigade, moved towards Drury’s Bluff till we struck the Darbytown road then went the direction of Malvern Hill camped and slept all night four miles from here.
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June 14th1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
in the evening we moved back towards the Bluff Camped on the River Road about one mile from the Pontoons
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June 15th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
left camp and crossed the river above the bluff and marched to Chester Station and took the cars for Petersburg, about dark got to P by 11 pm, and marched out two or three miles S E of the city and established our line on the right of Hagood in the woods and thru up ditches.
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June 15th 1864 From Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia in the words of Col James H Huggins & Maj William Barclay
Grant’s move to the south side of the James caused another movement of the army; and Colquitt’s Brigade moved to Petersburg, where it held an important position in the line during the siege, and repulsed two assaults of the enemy upon the line. The labor and hardships were very severe here, but were well borne and endured with the greatest fortitude by the troops of a young nation struggling to be free. Colonel Huggins, who had recreantly been promoted to fill the vacancy occasioned by the dismissal of Colonel Best, commanded during the siege. The enlisted men borne their part most nobly throughout the war, and deserve the highest plaudits of their countrymen.
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June 16th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
.. Some skirmishing this morning, in the evening the Enemy advanced his line, which caused some fighting on our right and left very little with us
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June 17th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Sharp shooting this morning, on Pickett last night. feel very dull, nothing of note occurred here, some considerable firing on some parts of the line
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June 18th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
.. Last night we evacuated our lines on this part and moved back half mile, for the purpose of straitening our lines.
Early this morning, the Enemy discovering the trenches empty, occupied them amid Cheers & Huzzas and no doubt thinking we were demoralized, pushed on after our Skirmishers, who after fighting them as long as they could fell back to our works and soon after a line of Battle approached with a yell and mad a feeble effort to charge our lines, but were easily repulsed, but they never came close enough for our fire to have it’s full effect.
.. In the evening they marched a column of a Regiment fourth 4 times and advanced in our front, they came in fine order to within 75 or 100 yds of our works, when our lines became so heavy, that the column collapsed and became a confused mess and unable to stand it, they left the field in perfect disorder, their dead and wounded were strewn thick over the field. fighting on some part of the line was almost continuous, but heaviest on the right, no results have been learned yet.
.. J.F. Smith killed to day just as the 2nd charge ceased.
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June 19th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Heavy Sharp shooting along our lines this morning.
The Enemy succeeded in constructing a Ditch in the edge of the field last night. 5 or 6 hundred yds from us here, but closer at some points, they are firing mortar shells at our lines this morning, I think no damage here as yet been done by them
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June 20th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
Sharp shooting the order of the day, the Enemy strengthened his works last night.
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June 21st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
no change to day skirmishing not quite so heavy
.
June 22nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
No change to day
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June 23rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Situation the same
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June 24th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
This morning the Enemy’s ditches seem to have been evacuated, but a party from Hagoods Brig sent out to ascertain found plenty of men in their ditches, things much the same as here to fore.
the force from Hagoods Brig which charged the Enemy’s works consisted of the 27th S.C.V. many of whom were captured
.
June 25th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
all more quiet to day, very little firing after night, the Pickett’s ran in and caused an alarm, but very little firing was done and that by the Yankees from their Breastworks.
W. J. Hefley was wounded in the head, in the time of it, but very seriously it is thought
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June 26th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Yankees throwing some mortar shells into our lines this morning, have heard of no damage done by them as yet. went to the city to day.
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June 27th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
all very quiet
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June 28th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Yankees still mortaring us, we are returning the courtesy to day, nothing worth noting has occurred to day in our front or rear has their if conception
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June 29th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
affairs same as here to fore
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Reminisces of Hugh Barclay [1864]
We lay around Petersburg a long time, watching the enemy and occasionally having a little scrap with "those people" as Gen. Lee called them. Somewhere there was fighting more or less every day.
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June 30th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Page wounded just after daylight, not seriously.
Considerable firing occurred on our right in front of Gracies Brig which we learned afterward was occasional by the Enemy making some demonstrations toward our lines, there no particulars have been learned
.

July 1864
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July 1st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday was relieved in the trenches last night by Martins Brig, our Regt remained as support
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July 2nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
relieved last night from our position support by 28th Ga. and came back to the edge of the city and slept in a ravine, firing last night on the line as is the Enemy were acquisitive our works, but have not been yet the occasion of it. learned that firing was all false alarms
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July 3rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Came into the ditches again last night relieving Gen Hagood’s Brig near the river on the left, all very quiet on the lines to day, Yankees firing a few mortar shells at our lines at intervals
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July 4th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
a very quiet day on front, Enemy opened a doz or more guns on the city for a short time, but soon ceased again
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July 5th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Gen Martin relieved us last night, we returned to the ravine near the city, very little firing on front this morning, warm dry + dusty _____ parched *with heat
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July 6th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
relieved Gen Martin last night, all tolerable quiet.
Jno M Smith wounded just after dark by a piece of shell which shattered his foot causing amputation just above the ankle
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July 7th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Some sharp shooting to day nothing unusual
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July 8th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
Was relieved in the trenches last night by Gen Martin and are resting in the ravine near the city again, in the evening considerable infantry firing and heavy artillery firing opened on the left near the river resembling an assault by one party or the other, but the causes and effects have not transpired as yet
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July 9th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
The firing yesterday evening was a chase gotten up by our men to discover the *strength of the Enemy, no news to day, still resting
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July 10th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Very quiet to day, J.N. Underwood left this evening supposed to be attempted to desert
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July 11th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
Came back to the trenches last night on the Hill at the Ayers House, very quiet this morning
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July 12th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Very hot and dry in the trenches, very little shelling to day
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July 13th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Heavy mortar shelling this morning no body hurt yet, marvelous accounts of the success of out troops in Md. all rumor, some of it so perhaps, hope it is
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July 14th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Was relieved from the trenches last night by Martin, morning papers say Early has whipped Lew Wallace at Monacacy Bridge Md. capturing Gen Tyler and Col. Seward and is with in 7 miles of Baltimore on the rail road between Washington and the latter place, great luck indeed, feel specially Lazy this evening, Yankees not even amusing us with their mortars, but we may expect some shelling this evening when it gets cooler, no rumors afloat to day so I have but little to note in my diary, but no person will keep a diary except he be crazy which mine will prove, wind blowing a pleasant breeze but the sun up to a boiling point, while I write I can hear a distant Yankee Band playing “God Save the King” I suppose they mean Abe our Christ and King, they may well call on God to save him for I doubt any body else can save him if old Jubal A gets after him right.
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July 15th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
was relieved by 27th Ga. last night and now resting in the ravine, no news this morning
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July 16th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
no news to day, heavy artillery firing during the evening
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July 17th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Came into the ditches last night, lines quiet this morning, our highly refined civilized and worst Enemy seem disposed for once to regain the holy day with reverence, perhaps bring man in repenting of their numerous sins and follies
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July 18th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
foggy this morning, can’t see 50 yds, Yankee ditches very still, but for an occasional blind whistler sent over to impress us with their presence, I might think the Enemy had left during the night.
.. I still continue to find proof of my insanity it is bad enough to be troubled with a bad memory, but when a man attempts to preserve his thoughts on paper it is in detestable evidence that he is crazy
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July 19th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
nothing of import to day on the lines. Tol Terrell killed in the evening by a Sharpshooter ball
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July 20th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
relieved last night by Martins Brigade, Ditches very muddy, it having rained yesterday, resting in usual place
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July 21st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
much cooler since the rain, still resting
.
July 22nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
no news to day, all very quiet since last night, Jisse is still in good health to day
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July 23rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Came back to the front last night our Regt remaining as support to the line. Our Co. with two others in the part on the Hill.
all very quiet in the morning, but in the evening a smart artillery dud just on our right. got the express extra this evening giving good accounts of a success of Hood in Ga. which I hope may be correct, we are serious looking for further news
.
July 24th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
affairs are as usual, so far as can be seen
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July 25th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
rained last night, Ditches very muddy + sloshy, clear this morning, Considerable sharp shooting this morning, in the evening a very heavy Artillery duel took place
.
July 26th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Came into the front last night relieving the 27th Ga. which had been on 6 days, we will remain six days, very quiet on the line this morning, infantry firing heard up towards Richmond this morning
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July 27th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
firing again heard in the direction of Richmond
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July 28th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
no change noticed in our front then again it is said _____ Grants Forces have been moved to the north side of the James at ______ Station and some of fighting has taken place to the latter, I have no particulars, about 6 in the evening we were relieved in the trenches by one of Martins Regt’s, and joined our Brigade which had been in reserve, about dark we moved around to the right and took the place of Fields Div., we were in position by 10 o clock at night
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July 29th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
like our new position extremely well, 800 yds to the Enemy’s line, no sharp shooting, *targets out all day and friendly
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July 30th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
At daylight this morning the Enemy blew up our works, over to the left where they were occupied by Elliott’s Brig. killing a number of our men, but during the day our men charged the Enemy where they had taken possession of our works killing and capturing quite a number, the artillery firing during the morning was terrific
.
July 31st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
.. very quiet again this morning and as it is Sunday, we give the Yankees credit for some respect for the holy day
.

August 1864
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August 1st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
.. A truce this morning to allow the Enemy to remove + bury their dead which remain between the lines who were killed in the affair of Saturday, not a gun is heard, the loss of the Enemy on Saturday is Estimated at three thousand, our loss eight hundred, of which a considerable number of the killed is due the explosion of the mine.
truce expired at 9 am but the lines are unusually quiet.
Prisoners Captured report that Gen Grant has several other mines to spring, but if he has no better luck with his others, they will not *further him much, among the prisoners captured was Brig Gen Bartlett with one wooden leg which he got shot Saturday, prisoners say Brig Gen Griffin was killed and his body removed to their lines.
rumors of Early again across the Potomac also rumors from Ga. of a reverse to our arms and of a success, Sherman retreat across its river and many others, but no reliable news.
Step Roberts started for Cleveland Co. N.C. to see his brother with W.T. Hefley’s furlough to be gone at most 10 days
.
August 2nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Lines very quiet this morning, we were relieved last night by a portion of Heth’s Div and returned to our usual resting bivouac where we are resting to day, we hear no news of great importance this morning.
report of Gen Stoneman captured at Clinton Ga. went into the city this evening and bought me a new pencil, have orders to go on the front to night, had a sprinkle of rain this evening, which made the air very cool & pleasant, had preaching by rev *Mr Thissen 6th Ga.
.
August 3rd 1864 From Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia in the words of Col. James H Huggins & Maj. William Barclay
The following are the names of the persons noted for their gallantry, but not the want of proper records, the peculiar acts of bravery by which they are distinguished, cannot be given.
.. Captain A. Young, Company K; Captain M.R. Ballenger, Company C; Lieutenant William F Smith, Company I; Joseph Adkins, Company B; Lieutenant J.M. Steel, Company I; Corporal J.M. Reeves, Company D; Privates R.C. Brock and John Hambrick, Company E; and Private E.D Cullence; at Seven Pines.
.. Privates R.H. Mcquire, H Elison, D.H. House, in the Battles before Richmond.
.. J.B. Fulton, B.C. Fulton, J.A. Cosner, and L.P. Parker, Company I, at South Mountain, Maryland.
.. A great many other officers and men have performed equally as gallant acts as those whose names appear above; but the officers commanding have usually refused to make any distinctions where nearly all act their part well.
.
.. Owing to the frequent changes in the officers commanding this regiment, there has been no correct record kept of dates , battles, &c., and I have been compelled to supply the dates in most cases myself. Many of them may therefore be incorrect, but they are very nearly right.
Below I subjoin a letter from Colonel Huggins, which will place him and his regiment right before the public, as regards the limited material with which he has supplied me.
.
Petersburg, Virginia,
August 3rd, 1864
.
.. Colonel Folsom, ---Dear Sir: I enclose to you a very imperfectly arranged history of the Twenty-third Georgia, prepared under circumstances that make it next to impossible to make it what it should be.
.. No record of battles, marches and events has been kept, consequently this report is made almost entirely from memory. Besides the foregoing, we are constantly on the front lines, near the enemy, and have but little time to devote to such duties, notwithstanding we feel deeply interested in your history of the regiments from our noble old mother State
With high regard and esteem,
Your obedient servant,
James H Huggins,
Colonel commanding Twenty-third Georgia Regiment
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August 3rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
On the front again, relieved Gen Martin Brigade, only half of our regiment on the line, the boys all rather suspicious of being blown up since Grant has begun springing his mines, lines quiet as usual some sharp shooting, day very warm appearance of rain, no news from home, don’t expect much till the Yankees are whipped out of Ga. which God grant may be soon
.
August 4th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
had a very quiet night, morning pleasant, nothing occurred as yet though we are daily looking for affairs to culminate in something grand explosive, the topic of day is mining, dirt *augurs & our Sappers discovered a mine completed almost yesterday on our right it was 13 feet beneath our ditch and no doubt about ready to receive the match, they made preparation for what might come at once, think if we are energetic and we discover more of their infernal machines.
.. Later in the day it was reported that the Yanks had been even mining under our own Brigade, do not know that it is so, but think it likely it may be so as it is a very favorable point for the business, being close to their lines and on high ground they also have an excellent chance to conceal their dirt, in the evening the Yankees showed *a Artillery on our line, the same one which killed Terrell
.
August 5th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
.. On Pickett last night from midnight til day very quiet through the night, foggy this morning some sharp shooting, understand that the rumor about discovering mines under our works is all gas, they be mining but when we discover them I fear it will be after they are blown out.
.. Considerable Sharp shooting late in the evening, Roker of Co. G shot in the arm to day by a minie ball, there was a small mine plume in Gaines front blowing up a Yankee sap considered firing enough after this
.
August 6th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
was relieved by Martins Brig, resting to day, line very quiet very little fighting of any kind
.
August 7th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Very quiet this morning, continued quiet all day Sunday
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August 8th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
Last night was the most quiet night which we have had in a long time, very warm to day, flying rumors that the Yankees are leaving here, late in the evening very heavy artillery firing on the left of center, chiefly mortars
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August 9th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
.. Came on to line last night relieving Martin’s Brig, our Regt has position 2nd from the right of the Brigade. lines very quiet this morn, Capt Patton came to cook yard this evening so I hear, had a letter from *bro 11th Ga. Anderson Brig they are at New Market Heights 13 miles below Richmond north side of the river
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August 10th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
.. Rained a shower yesterday about dark, quiet cool + pleasant this morning, lines quiet, about the usual amount of Sharp shooting Chiefly in front of Gracie just on our right.
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August 11th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
.. No news all quiet this morning, Capt Patton came over this morning, very dull times, there are three points of interest during each day with us now, first early in the morning, when the newsboy comes along the lines shouting, here’s your daily papers, when there is a general stir till everyone has indulged himself in regards to the news.
.. Second later in the day when the mail come in, each man thinks he ought to have a letter and is astor until he is certain there is none for him, and third, in the evening when the cooks bring in the rations, then it is that every man is on hand and only retires when he has received his days ration of bread and meat, occasionally Mr. Grant gets up some excitement in addition to the regular routine, just for benefit of course, but always to these special hours is our attention turned, and if it were not for these, I do not know what we would do, but die of Ennui.
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August 12th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
Came off front last night being relieved by martins Brig, waked up this morning to hear smart cannonade on the front mostly mortars, later in the evening the mortar batteries exchanged courtesies again.
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August 13th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Still resting no news, lines quiet, in the evening Maj. Fuller formally orderly Sgt of Co. H. Text 21st verse of the 5th Chapter of the Epistle to the Romans that as sin hath reigned unto Death, even so might grace him through righteousness unto eternal life by Jesus Christ our Lord, first tells that he belongs to the primitive Baptists, must preach the truth regardless of men’s feelings, his duty to preach the gospel to everyone, but into them, defines the meaning of the word reign and the difference between rain and reign – has since = reigned unto Death, what the word says of it – feet swift to shed Blood illustrated by the war which was brought about by sin, by one death came upon all, all are sinners actual – but the principal was inherited from Adam, all are the progeny of Adam, all once had a standing in Adam, all fell with him so by the obedience of one, many shall be made righteous – The obedience of Christ saves every man – will not preach that mans obedience can save him, Christ is the Savior of all.
.. Adams sin imported to all men – Christ’s righteousness imported to all – this an article of faith with all the Churches illustrate that two births natural and spiritual – The spiritual and eternal life of the Christian commences with the spiritual birth – Gods Children live the life of Christ, Eternal without beginning or end + the Bible never tells him anything of any of Gods children unborning themselves – this is Eternal Life that they know him, without this Eternal Life, they do not know God, - the redemption extends only to the children of God – In conclusion – tells the sinners that without God saves them they are forever lost – that they are powerless to do anything towards it
.
August 14th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
dull to day, took a stroll over the city or what was once the city it being now not much more than a ruin
.
August 15th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
Came into the trenches last night, rained last evening cool and pleasant this morning our position, 3rd from the right on the Hill, like it very well – as the sun gets up, the warmth increased it is almost insuch *portable but now think it will rain again to day, about 3 pm commenced to rain, one of the hardest I ever saw, the water flooded the trenches, beat down the works etc.
.
August 16th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Still cloudy this morning, Ditches very muddy, very little firing on the lines, no news to notice as yet, had a letter yesterday from O.O.M. at Atlanta Ga., must answer it to day, if it don’t rain, feel very well this morning in high spirits, think rebeldom will survive 1864
Anxious for news from Atlanta and the Army there – all depends on operations between Hood n Sherman, hope Sherman will have to back out from Atlanta –
.
August 17th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Mortar Batteries on each side opened last night, three men of our Regt were wounded by fragment of shells, rained a slight shower last night which makes the ditches slippery, cool and cloudy this morning
.
August 18th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Came out of the ditches last night, this morning at 2 am all of our artillery opened on the Enemy and in a short time their Batteries replied, and the reports were terrific, and was continued til near day, reports early in the morning that the Yankees had moved out onto the Weldon RR, about 12 m our Brig was ordered to the right, went down the Weldon RR about 2 miles below the Lead Mills and formed line of Battle, behind some of Heth’s Div who had been driving the Yankees back and great many of them, soon the works in our front moved forward to the left, and we made the front line, the Yankees soon made a change on us but were easily driven back, with loss, our line was formed across the RR, desulting firing was kept up between the Pickett’s, most of the evening, after dark we withdrew to the Breastworks and afterwards went back to our resting camp
.
August 19th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
waked up this morning and found our Batteries again at work on the Yankees around the whole line, the reports of the guns was astounding soon we had orders to be ready to march, and report said Yankees were still in possession of the RR and we know what was up, moved to a point near the RR, we moved to the left and with Martin’s and Clingman’s Brigs got in the rear of the party who were on the RR, attacked them routing them from their works and captured 2 or 3000 prisoners, the loss of our Brig was light, some of them were captured, Capt Ferguson mortally wounded, Lt. *Frost wounded, most of our Co., that I know of came back to our resting camps after night three of our comp missing J G Newt, G W Hefley and C H Smith
.
August 20th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Brig went into the Ditches this morning relieving Ransoms line, rained hard in the evening , no more news from the right all quiet in that direction
.
August 21st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Still cloudy this morning heavy cannonading over on the Weldon RR, small arms if any, cannot be heard at this distance, think there must be a determined attack there from one side or the other, about mid day heavy artillery firing and the infantry was heard on the line near Appomattox. report says the Enemy were making another attempt to carry our works at that front, thinking no doubt that our line had been weakened then to reinforce our right
.
August 22nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
Very quiet all round this morning, weather cool & windy no further news from our right this morning, but suppose the Enemy still held possession of the Rail Road.
had a letter from cousin O.C.M. at Atlanta yesterday, answered it. Expect to be relieved to go on the right soon, as this is too nice a place for Colquitt’s Brigade long *at a time.
.. Gen Hagoods Brig report says was badly used up, captured killed and wounded. about12 m had orders to move out, soon as Gen Ransoms Brig came in, we moved out and went to our usual Leisure Camp. in the evening the 27th + 28th went over to our front at Ayers House.
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August 23rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Cloudy and looking like it will rain
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August 24th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
lines quiet, B. W. Tidil came to the company to day from Hosp. where he has been since he got wounded at Drurys Bluff
.
August 25th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Came into the trenches last night at the Ayers House, lines quiet, was on Pickett last night 25th of August, the Campaign now at a crisis, the Federals has the Weldon RR.
will Gen Lee allow him to remain on the R.R. or will he make an effort to force him to relinquish it. that would be very hard to do, and would cost many lives, to allow him to remain will only be giving him control of the R.R. and a more advantages position for extending his lines still farther to the left in the direction of the Danville RR., a few days will probably decide the matter, I look for war in unabated long war pure and *undullable to fighting right left and center. Artillery Infantry and Cavalry, front flank and rear. war war war and somebody will be hurt --- that is my horn.
in the evening _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ in the direction of the Weldon RR. and it is supposed our forces ____ *___ing it to _____ at that _____ result not yet known
.
August 26th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
this morning rather foggy and from appearances would suppose that both sides Expect an attack at this point Artillery on both sides _____used and considerable activity maintained out by each party, morning papers say nothing of the heavy cannonade heard on the right yesterday, no accounts of a fight in that quarter having transpired as yet, but do not think the affair was very important any way, later in the day we had news from the right, we attending the Enemy near Kearne’s Station capturing over two thousand prisoners and driving him out of his breastworks which we hold we also took nine pieces of *artillery
.
August 27th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
rained last night, lines quiet this morning no news, except a confirmation of the news from Kearnes Station great talk of an Armistice, North and South = papers of late contain little else = Lt. Brooks died yesterday from the effects of a wound in the head received in the engagement of the 19th inst.
.
August 28th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
This morning at Daylight the Yankees began firing small arms at us from their Ditches, and continued to fire volley after volley for some time, they seemed to be of the impression that we were assaulting their works = we fired but little after that, everything remained its usual quiet.
.
August 29th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
to day the great Yankee Democratic convention meets at Chicago to nominate a candidate for President of the United States in opposition to Mr. Lincoln.
Affairs along the line were all quiet as usual
.
August 30th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Regiment was relieved from the hill last night. this morning came on the at the City Point RR. relieving 27th Ga., desperate shelling last night, quiet this morning
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August 31st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
To day three years since I entered the service, lines very quiet to day, J.T. Presley came in to day from the Hosp where he has been since Drurys Bluff wounded, no news to day of interest, got a late Northern paper, no nomination made the 29th at Chicago
.

September 1864
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September 1st 1864 WHS diary Co, I Thursday
Considerable Artillery firing along the lines this morning, other wise all quiet as usual, last night was unusually quiet
.
September 2nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
Lines very quiet this morning, no news
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September 3rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Last night there was a general jollification occasion among the Yankee arms, about 9 or 10 pm a tremendous cheer arose from their lines near the Ayers House. the first impression was that there was an assault making on our lines, cheer after cheer arose along their line, each was which continued some time at intervals their Bands played and it is supposed among us that there was some
Extraordinary good news, the fall of Atlanta, or something else, we will hear from it in a short time no doubt, just after one a cheer *proceeded rousing cheers, when the noise died away and everything was as quiet as the sick Chamber. a Reb, on the hill, at the Ayers House, screamed to the Yankees at the top of his voice, go to hell, the peculiar comic turn of this expression called forth an immense laughter along our lines, we were all at our post during this unpleasant burst of Yankee feeling and waited in silence to see the turn things would take after it ceased, we again sought our beds of repose forced to usual wakeful watch, towards day.
our Picket were alarmed and ran in, but their fears seemed grounded, they were again placed out and remained quiet till day, it is reported this morning that it was the capture of Atlanta by Sherman which caused such a joyous sensation amongst the Yankees last night and I am of the opinion that there is grounds to believe the report true, we have no news in several days, from there only a rumor that a fight was commenced on the 31st and continued the next day
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September 4th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
All very quiet this morning, was on pickett last night
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September 5th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
Very quiet to day, heavy cannonading all of the lines, unusually heavy on the right, cause not known, news from the home to day, Atlanta given up Hood at Lovejoy’s twenty two miles from Atlanta on *Milson Road. particulars not known
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September 6th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
was relieved last night by 19th Ga. and resting in ravine between Beantown and the city, Hood safe at Lovejoy
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September 7th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Still resting
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September 8th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Came into the ditches relieving 27th Ga.
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September 9th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
All quiet this morning no news of importance, the Yankees suppose to be concentrating on the South Railroad preparation to an advance upon the Southside RR. we will know soon perhaps
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September 10th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
last night, the Yankees held another nocturnal jollification, yelling an hour or two.
Anxious to know what they have heard now which so pleases them
.
September 11th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Very quiet last night and to day, on piquet last night
.
September 12th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
quiet again this morning
.
September 13th1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Very quiet this morning cool + windy a regular Autumn day, no news yet to day
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September 14th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Enemy commenced shelling city this morn our Batteries opened on their lines and a tremendous shelling _______ at noon, all again quiet
.
September 15th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
quiet this morning and last night, at about 10 am our Div came out of the trenches being relieved by a Division of Johnson’s we then went around to the right on the plank road and camped for the night, it was said the Enemy were pushing a column towards the S S RR and had already possession of the plank road farther down, in the evening it was rumored that they left the road and were retiring
.
September 16th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
quiet in this direction this morning, light skirmishing heard down the road, but no stir at 8 o clock am
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September 17th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
another day of rest and quiet
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September 18th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Moved back this morning to the ravine at 11 pm reservoir water works, quiet this morning went to the Catholic Church and seen the priest go through his mysterious course of worship after which he made some understandable remarks from which I judged him to be a man of fine service
.
September 19th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
quiet this morning we expect to remain here some days, cooks been ordered in and we will now do our own cooking and eat some warm victuals
.
September 20th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Very pleasant resting this morning lines quiet
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September 21st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Just after daylight the Yankees opened their Batteries on the city and _____ Endured which didn’t last any however, all again quiet
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September 22nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
line quiet news from the valley represent Early Defeated and falling back no particulars given our loss said to be severe, Gen Rodes + Godwin killed, the Battle was fought near Wilmington
.
September 23rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
quiet cloudy looks like rain this morning
.
September 24th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Cloudy and raining mist this morning, no news, lines quiet
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September 25th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Came to the front last night and lay in rear Ditch as support to the line, quiet cool last night, fine this morning Church pleasant, lines quiet no news
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September 26th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
Came back to the *water works last night, all quiet this morning, was relieved at 4 pm by Gen Lee our whole Div wing present
.
September 27th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Quiet this morn Gen ______ has been sent off to ____ + to Kezletown near *I thought, perhaps farther, we look for heavy operations soon here
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September 28th1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Came into the trenches this morning = relieving Gen Bushrod Johnson Div, lines quiet, merry cheering from all Round Confederacy looking up I hope
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September 29th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Johnson’s Div came into the trenches about 11 am we moved out and moved over to Richmond, Depot near _______ first after dark got on the train and went to Rices marched across the James above *Drury and took a *nap
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September 30th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
moved out near Battery Prescott which was an outwork of ours and had been occupied by the Yankees, in the evening we made an attempt to storm it but failed, our Co. lost no men hurt in the charge
.

October 1864
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October 1st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Cloudy & raining to day, had a chill went to the Hosp. Brig Entrenched ______ in front Fort Harrison
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October 2nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Still at Hosp feel better to day, no new move, some shelling between our Batteries & Harrison
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October 3rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
At Hospital yet taking quinine, no news ____ and cloudy and looks like rain, lines quiet as usual, had another chill to day
.
October 4th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Cloudy & raining this morning still at Hospital, lines quiet this morning no special news
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October 5th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
All quiet this morning in the vicinity at hosp, clear this morning, news encouraging from Gen Hancock *Points, but no special news from anywhere
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October 6th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
All quiet at the Hospital feeling better improved and will return to the Regiment soon
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October 7th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
Brig had orders to move last night, indeed our whole Div marched nearly all night, over to the Darbytown road.
I being sick, did not march with the troops, and did not get over till this morning
skirmishing with the Enemy began early, Fields Div being first engaged + capturing a portion of the Enemy’s line a few hundred horses + prisoners, ten pieces Art + C later in the day the same div made an attempt on another portion of the line but did not become engaged in the evening, we drew off a mile or two back and camped
.
October 8th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
In camp all quiet not a word of news stirring to day, cool + windy *Greensboro
all quiet, still in camp this morning
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October 10th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
moved half a mile to the front, near the New Market road and camped in the works, all quiet
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October 11th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
all quiet this morning
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October 12th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
our Regt with the 6th was moved to the front last night and filled a gap which was open between the left of our Div and the right of Fields Div, all quiet this morning cannon heard in the direction of Petersburg, weather fine, Anxiously awaiting the results of operations in Ga., the paper intimate that there is some good news from there but are not allowed to make it public yet, provoking to be sure.
Between sun down + dark, our Regt and the 6th was moved back to our camp, and from there the whole Brigade was moved on to the line on the extreme right of our Div. was the New Market road and commenced making Breast works. raining at day
.
October 13th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
had a fair Bank of earth this morning for our protection early in the morning heavy infantry firing was heard on our left, we had orders to be ready to move, was moved to the left our Div line, halted, formed in one rank, but were not attacked, in the evening, heard that the Yankees attacked our works on the Darbytown road, Fields Div and were repulsed in several assaults, towards night everything became quiet and we were moved back to our former position on the right of the Div
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October 14th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
lines very quiet this morning, news from the left is substantially the same as we heard yesterday evening, no other news this morning strengthening our works to day
.
October 15th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Went with the company on Pickett, our line of Pickett’s in a thick woods, no Yankees visible, but they make a great noise in their camp, no special news to day, some accounts of Hoods Army, a portion of it on the RR between Atlanta + Dalton look for some stirring news from that quarter soon.
.
October 16th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Still on Pickett, unusually quiet this morning in the Yankee camps, I almost concluded they have aborted their position.
was relieved this morning by Co. F returned to our position on the line
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October 17th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
all quiet this morning
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October 18th WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
lines quiet this morning, no news
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October 19th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
All quiet again this morning we still occupy the extreme right of our Division just to the left of Fort Gilmer
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October 20th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
All quiet this morning, no news
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October 21st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
yesterday evening a very heavy cannonade in the direction of Fort Harrison, quiet no news, inspection this morning by Gen Longstreet
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October 22nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Cold to day a slight sprinkle and now in the morning all quiet
.
October 23rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Clear & pleasant to day, on Guard till midnight last night, sleepy to day
.
October 24th1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
quiet no news this morning, much warmer then
.
October 31st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
line quiet, weather
.

November 1864
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November 1st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
very dull no news
.
November 2nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
quiet *lines *heard *cannon weather pleasant to day
.
November 3rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday Petersburg, Va.
no news lines quiet
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November 4th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
went on Pickett to day with the company all day very quiet no news to day, windy and cloudy
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November 5th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Came off Pickett no news
.
November 6th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
quiet Rev H. *MCreedy preached to our Brig to day J.T. Roberts came in from N.C. to day, arm still disabled from his wound
.
November 7th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
raining to day no news all quiet on this part of our lines W.J. Hefley came in on a visit
.
November 8th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
all quiet, no news, wrote a letter to J W Thomas Head Avery.
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November 9th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
not a word of news from any quarter, our lines on the north side, severely quiet, some cannonading heard on the right, Suppose to be our Batteries on the James River Shelling *Ditch loss severe
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November 10th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
all quiet this morning
.
November 11th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
lines undisturbed this morning --- Troops building quarters. wrote a letter to cousin Mat. on parapet guard from mid night last night til day. this morning ---- not a word of news this morning. weather fine and fair
.
November 12th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
lines easy here, no news
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November 13th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
All quiet, no news
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November 14th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
Came on Pickett this morning with the Company, Piquet line easy, no news
.
November 15th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
came off Pickett this morning, relieved by Co. F
.
November 16th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
Thanksgiving day preaching at Laurel Hill Church, all quiet
.
November 17th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
All quiet
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November 18th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
quiet
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November 19th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
quiet to day --- some rapid firing last night to the right. Suppose to be beyond the river on Gen Picket’s front
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November 20th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
rained all last night and all to day, Kirshairs Div. came from the valley two or three days since, they are now on the right
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November 21st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
rained all night last night, still continues, all quiet on our part of the lines --- no news
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November 22nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
rained again last night, cooler this morning, some prospect of clearing up, had orders to be ready for a move a move yesterday evening, but not yet
.
November 23rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
very cold weather to day, news of Sherman’s advance toward central Ga. All quiet
.
November 24th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
came on Pickett this morning with Company, all quiet to day
.
November 25th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
Came off Pickett this morning, all quiet
.
November 26th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
General inspection to day, all quiet
.
November 27th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
no news
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November 28th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
no news quiet
.
November 29th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
Went to Richmond to day, on twelve hours pass, remained till after performance at theatre, came back to camps by mid night
.
November 30th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
All quiet, no news to day
.

December 1864
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December 1st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
All quiet no news
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December 2nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
in status quo
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December 3rd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
all quiet
.
December 4th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
went on Pickett this morning, lines quiet
.
December 5th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
Came off Pickett, no news
.
December 6th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
all quiet
.
December 7th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
had *orders at dark to move off at once, went to Chaffin’s Bluff and slept at night
.
December 8th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
Came back to quarters this morning, cause of the move not right as commenced came
.
December 9th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
All quiet no news to day
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December 10th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
had orders last night to cook three days rations and be ready to move by day light, this morning, accordingly we moved this morning to the left and in conjunction with Fields Div moved down the Darby town road three miles or more to New Market Heights where we found the Enemy intrenched.
Slight skirmishing ensued afterward we returned to the camp and quarters near Gilmer
.
December 11th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
All quiet this morning
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December 12th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
in status quo
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December 13th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
quiet no news
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December 14th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
All quiet
.
December 15th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
went on pickett this morning, lines quiet
.
December 16th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
relieved on Pickett by Co. F no news
.
December 17th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
*pricy inspection to day no news
.
December 19th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
All quiet no news
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December 20th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
This morning Woffords Brigade relieved Kirkland’s Brigade of our Division from the line and the latter marched in the direction of Richmond, destination as of yet not known.
lines quiet
.
December 21st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
lines quiet, I hear that Hagoods Brig of our Div., marched towards Richmond this morning.
drew three days rations with orders to cook up rather expect we will move to Wilmington N.C. perhaps
.
December 22nd 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
had orders to be ready to move at 4 this morning accordingly marched to Richmond by day light and cross the river and brought up at the Danville RR. in Manchester left on the cars at 11 am arrived at Amelia C H by dark, cold and very disagreeable, by day we were at South Boston, in 31 miles of Danville, here our Engine broke down and we lay over and made goodies and eat Breakfast, at 11 am we again took the train and by dark we were at Danville, here we marched out to the woods and camped for the night
.
December 24th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
left camp early and marched out on the Piedmont RR to the first Station 8 or 9 miles, here went into the woods and camped, weather very fine
.
December 25th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Sunday
Christmas --- marched to Ruffin, the next state and in the evening got aboard a train and run down to Greensboro N.C., here we were ordered not to get off the train
.
December 26th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Monday
left Greensboro about two hours before day, run through Rally before dark and arrived at Goldsboro by 11 pm drew rations and changed cars
.
December 27th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Tuesday
note: (Here part of the page has been torn or cut off at the bottom) = side of the river near Fort Fisher & camped
.
December 28th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Wednesday
about sun down we crossed river about three miles wide, have landed at Ft Anderson & camped
.
December 29th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Thursday
remained in camp all day
.
December 30th 1864 WHS diary Co. I Friday
took the steamer at 10 am and went to Wilmington, marched out on the road towards Fort Smith five miles & camped
.
December 31st 1864 WHS diary Co. I Saturday
Still in camp
.

January 1865
.
SGB Diary Co. A
Let. T.B. Davis Co A 23rd Ga Regt was ordered on duty as Cap on the 4th day of Jan 1865.
.
W,M, Dum Co A 23rd Ga Regt was elected 1st Sergt on the 6th day of Jan 1865 from 3rd Sergt.
.
J. Greyton (D.J. Guyton) was elected 3rd Sergt the 6th day of Jan 1865 Co A 23rd Ga
.
Sunday Jan 8th 1865
.
I was detailed on the 7th Jan 65 with 25 men and 3 Corpl for Police Gard and went about 2 miles on the plant (plank) Road from Camp Writinganeh (Camp Write on gaurd) and stad till the night of the 8th 1865 and was relived by Lt. Davis of Co A 23rd Ga regt.
.
Jan 9th 1865.
We had a review to day by General Bragg near Wilmington, S.C. taken Division.
.
Maj Baston with 3 company’s of 23rd Ga Regt got to Wilmington Va on the way from Richman, Va on the 27th of Dec 1864 and then taken the boat and went to Fort Anderson 15 miles below Wilmington, N.C. on the leoxi fear river, this Jan 5th 1865.
.
And stade at the Fort till the 29th and then came back to Wilmington, N.C. and went in Camp
.
Jan 11th 1865
.
I was in command of the Company to day Jan 12th 1865.
.
I drilled the Company to day near Wilmington, N.C. 18 men and 4 Sergt total enlisted 22
.
And from Wilmington, N.C. 125 at Calquidth Berigade left the Camp the night of the of the 12th about 2 o’ clock and came to Sugar loaf and lay the night of the 13th and the 14th. We went from Camp flowing the yankers.
,
The 15th we fell back to Sugar loaf.
.
6th Ga Regt men was killed the 15th Jan 1865.
.
We formed a line, the yankers charged again to our picket line. We had a fight on the 18th day of Jan 1865.
.
The body fell back that night and then the fight started 19 men were killed.
.
Jan 14th 1865
.
Stayed the night on the line, left the line to day and walked 2 miles of Wilmington to Co A was sent a head for guard to keep the men from going to Wilmington.
.
And then we came back to Sugar Loaf the 28th of Jan 1865.
.
I got a fular the 27th of Jan to go to Wilmington sign by Gen Calquitt Calersmith Lt estell aa G (A.A.G. Assistant Adjutant General) Jan 30th 65.
.
The yankers attacted our picket line to day but went back. We got 2 prisoners Jan 20th 1865.
.
I relived Co G 23rd regt on picket to day at Sugar loaf.
.
Capt Tarvis (Davis) of Co A 23rd regt was officer of the Brigade picket line Jan 21st 1865 at Bardeveel Com of Picket the 21st 1865 at Sugar Loaf.
.

February 1865
.
I, S.G. Burdett with Co A of the 23rd Ga regt off of picket the 2nd day of Feby 1865.
.
S.G. Burdett with Co A of the 23rd Ga regt relived Co G of the 23rd Ga Regt off the picket the 2nd day of Feby 1865.
.
Capt Neely of the 19th Ga Regt was officer of the Brigade Picket line and Co B of the 23rd Ga Regt relived me the 3rd of Feby 1865.
.
I was Brigade officer of the night, the night of the 4th of Feby 1865.
.
Near at Sugar Loaf I went the line one time the Order was to keep 4 men from each Regt at attission.
.
The Brest Works and to report all relarms.
I received the order from the Jackson A.A. Gen.
.
Suger Loaf N.C. Jany 4th 1865 the 23rd Ga Regt was on dress parade to day. Cap Oureis (Capt Davis) Card (Comd) the Camfellny (Company) and Col Sharp the 4th of Feby 1865. We were on dress parade to day. I went on with the Company and Col Sharp stade for the dress parade the 5th of Feby 1865.
.
Upson Cochrean of Co A 23rd Ga Regt returned to the regt from Gervass the 5th day of Feby 1865.
.
Co A 23rd Ga Regt Feby 12th 1865 relived Co G off of picket the night of the 11th 1865 and made new Rifle Pitts and was relived the morning of the 12th by Co B of the 23rd Ga.
.
I went on with Co Feby 11th 1865. The yankers attacked our picket line to day and drove our pickets in and 6 Crofilde (Killed?) and (on?) Old Picket line and run our (an) old Gun Boat up a guats (against?) on (our?) 7 works.
.
Sugar Loaf N.C. Feby 13th 1865. I was lourd (loured) in the ofter part of the night on the Parfit the C night of the 13th of Feb 1865.
.
The orders were to keep up one 2 tenth of the men.
.
Sugar Loaf N.C. Feby 15th 1865. We had orders on the line to be up at the Brest Works by 4 o’ clock, before day. Looking for a attack by the yankers.
.
Sugar Loaf Feb 16th 1865 we had to get up at the Brest Work this morning at 4 o’clock looking for the yankers to attack us fort. Anderson shot 4 shorts down the river at 5 o’clock Feby 16th 1865.
.
Sugar Loaf N.C. Feb 17th 1865 I was on duty to day in charge of a working party getting Brys to go in front of the Brest Works with 4 men by orders of Lt. Col Sharp 23rd Ga Regt.
.
Sugar Loaf N.C. 17th Feb 1865
.
The yankers run ther Gun Boats on the Cape fear river about 2 o’clock p.m. and fired on Fort Anderson and shelled verry heavy. One old Munertern (Monitor) Run up in one mile of fort Anderson and throwed several Shorts shots.
.
Sugar Loaf N.C. Feb 18th 1865 I was officer of the Guard for feastfit duty of the Regt the night of the 17th of Feb 1865.
.
Capt Graveh (Groves) Co B was officer of the night Feb 18th 1865.
.
Sugar Loaf N.C. Feb 18th 1865 the yankers run their Gun Boats up to day and shelled Fort Anderson heavy all day.
Sugar Loaf, N.C. We was e bacerated (evacuated) by our men on the 17th day of Feb 1865 on Sunday.
.
We fell back to the 7 mile Fort from Wilmington and stayed. And though the yankers was coming and flung up some lodgs and then Caley (Compy?) with Brigade left and went to Fort Camble on the Ceap (Cape) Fear river and lay there the night and the morning of the 20th of Feb. We formed a line of Battle from the river on the Left of the Brigade. Was east from the river.
.
Lt. Col. Sharp comedy Regt A Monday 20 Feb 1865.
.
Fort Camble Wilmington, Feb 21st 1865 I am on picket to day Co A Ga Regt I relived Co G of the 23rd Ga Regt of the 23rd Ga Regt on the 20th Feb 65.
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Capt. Patton officer of the Picket line. Fort Camble Wilmington, N.C. Feb 21st 1865. Myself and Capt. Sharp with 16 men went out and scant (scout) to day. We were about one mile from our Brest Works but we did not see anything. But a while after we got back the yankers came on us with heavy force and we had to give back. Though we taken the picket line back. and stade on piket till dark and Co B relived us. Com (Commander) Bady (badly) hurt on the line.
.
Wilmington N.C. was ereaceated (evacuated) on the 22nd day of Feb 1865 by our troops and we moved to north east river and crosed hit about 1 o’clock pm and went about a half mile from the River and formed a line of Battle and flung up tempearaer Works and stade till 4 o’clock in the morning of the 23rd of Feb and left a 4 o’clock.
.
The yankers and our men Carvielle (Cavalry?) fought all the evening. the 22nd at the Bridg on north east river.
.
We left North East River at 4 o’clock in the morning of the 23rd day of feb 1865 and marched 18 miles and camped in a line of Battle though a Old field and left at day light the morning of the 24th and march 20 miles to Rock Fish Creek and camped. Hit rained all day on the day of the 24th Feb 1865 and we stade at Rock Creek
.
Where we first camped till the morning of the 27th and with 23rd Ga Regt and made Camp about 2 hundred yards from where we first made camp down in the Bend of the Creek 27th of Feb 65.
.
The day of the 26th of Feb 1865-ther was some men taken up for stealing from the Setisans (Sutlers) and ther Bucked them and the men lent (let) them Luse and then bucked them again and then lent them Luse Luat (Yet?) a gin so the Guards shot at the men for lusing them but was not hurt but a mess.
.
Lt Estell of Calquith of (abreviation for officers) Stafs (Lt. Harry Estill, Ordanance Officer on Gen Collquitt’s staff) Stueka Bayanetinane (Stuck a Bayonet in one) man. I got a call on the 28th day of Feb 1865 to go to the Wagon yard after some paper but I did not go to the Wagon yard. But I went out in the country after some potatoes. But I did not get anything only my dinner. I did not have to pay anything for dinner.
.
Datson Bently went with me this was in Dufling (Duplin) County N.C.
.

March 1865
.
I was detailed fore Guard the morning of the 1st day of March 1865 with 6 men and 20 CVF to guard the Bridg across Rock Fish Creek, N.C. and was relived the morning of the 2nd of March by Lieut Harris of Co F -23rd Ga Regt the order was to let no man cross the bridg without a pass from the Brigade Commander Wilmingtonson
.
Fleanasur County, N.C.
Dufling (Duplin) Country
Yesian “Hanarue (New Hanover) Co
at Rock Fish Creek
.
Flaker Division got to Rock Fish Creek on the 24th day of Feb 1865 and stade in camp at that place till the 5th of March 65 and left Rock Creek the morning of the 5th and went to Kinston, N.C. on the cars. We got to S Kinston about sun down 5th of March 1865 and we then went out from the town about one half mile to camp and we stade in camp till after the night of the 6th of March 1865 and we got orders to git ready to march and we fell in to lines about 1 o’clock and marched about 3 miles below Kinston and crossed the Noose River and camped in the woods 3 miles from Kinston the night of the 6th of March 1865. And went on the front line the night of the 7th of March between the railroad and the mill and flung up some works and lay till the morning of the 8th and we left a 4 o’clock and went on the left in the rear of the yankers and attacted them, and run them back about 2 miles. The night of the 8th. We flung up works on the road and lay there till the morning of the 9th and went on the left of the yankers to attach them but they found us out and we went and lay in the weads behind our works and the morning of the 10th we went on the left of the yankers and attacted them but did not take the works. Then we fell back BC to our works and lay the night of the 10th March 65 and then we fell back and crossed the river to Kinston, N.C. and on the 11th day of March 1865.
.
R. Dicil Cantrell was wounded slightly on the arm on the 8th of March by a peace of shell.
.
Col Neel of the 19th Ga Regt was killed on the 8th of March by a miney ball near Kinston, N.C.
.
Colquiths Brgad left the works at the river near Kinston and went about 6 miles below Kinston and camped the night of the 11th
.
And then march back to Kinston the day of the 12th and formed a line of Battle in the old field at Kinston and lay there in line of Battle the night of the 12th of March 65.
.
Kinston, N.C. was evaceated by order of Gen Bragg on the 13th day of March 1865.
.
Col Calequitts Brigade left Kinston on the 13th of March and marched to Maze hall 11 miles from Kinston and camped the night of the 13th and left at sun up the morning of the 14th 65 and got to Goldsburg, N.C. about 3 o’clock on the 14th of March 65 and stoped one mile from Goldsburg to cook ratian.
.
Distents from Golds Barote (Goldsboro) to Maze Hall is 15 miles and from Maze Hall to Kinston is 11 miles total from Goldsburg to Kinston is 26 miles from Goldsburg to Morehead City, N.C. is 95 miles.
.
We camped at Goldsburg the night of the 14th of March and left at 6 o’clock the morning of the 15th and marched 17 miles.
.
From Goldsburg N.C. we within 6 miles of and of Smith field and camped the night of the 15th left on the morning of the 16th of March 65. Marched about 15 miles past Smith field and camped the night of the 16th. We marched 12 miles the day of the 16th of March 1865.
.
The distant from Goldsburg to Smith field isn 23 miles and from Smith field N.C. to Raleigh, N.C. is about 30 miles by moggon (waggon?) road.
.
The Division stoped 5 miles from Smith field, N.C. the 16th of March 65 and camped ther till the morning of the 18th of Mar 65.
.
We left Smith field the 18th and marched about 18 miles the 18th of Mar and formed line of Battle about 3 o’clock pm.
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One mile from Bentonville, N.C. to front General Sherman of the Yanker Army. And lay in line of battle till the morning of the 19th of Mar 65 and the Battle open about 10 o’clock am.
.
March 18 1865
.
Ther was man shot out at the 28th Ga regt forn turning a man lous that was bucked at Rock fish creek N.C. Nov 22nd 1864
.
Sergt Gus Wright and C. Marian Rance of Co A 23rd ga regt was killed on the 19th of March 1865.
.
Our men and the yankers fought on the 19th and on the 20th of March 65 our men fell back the night of the 21st of March 1865.
.
Gen. Joseph E Johnson was in command of the Army. We had got orders to march at 9 o’clock this the 24th day of March 1865. I was excused by the Doctor on the 18th day of March 65 and I came back to the camp on the 23rd of March 65.
.
We left Smith field the 24th day of March 1865 and marched about 10 miles back past Smith field and camped the night of the 24th March 1865.
.
Smith field, N.C. I had a pass the 30th of March 65 from Col Zachary the Jackson A Gen.
.
I was on guard around the Camp the 31st day of March 65.
.

April 1865
.
the Regt was inspected Sunday morning April 2nd by Col Ballenger and Mag Boston.
.
I was in charge of the Co Calquith Brigade Haved, camped on the 4th of April 65 at Smith field, N.C. hardeer (Hardee) Corps was relived on the 3rd of April by Gen. Johnson. Also hit was the 7th of April by barer Vance of N.C.
.
I was on Brigade guard the 7th day of April 65.
.
Richman was evaceated by our men on the 2nd day of April 1865. General Calquith Came back from Georgia to the Birgade on the 9th day of April 1865.
.
I was in command of the Co the 8th and the 9th day of April 1865.
.
Col. Balenger got back to the Regt on the 20th day of April 1865 from Georgia on furlough.
.
Johnson Army left Smith field, N.C. on the 10th of April and marched about 10 miles. Hardeer Corps went the road to works (towards) Raleigh. We marched about 16 or 18 miles the 11th. Went by Clayton, that is a little valley, between Smith field and Raleigh, N.C. on the Raleigh and Goldsburg Railroad and camped in 5 miles of Raleigh, N.C. and went through Raleigh on the 12th of April and camped 6 miles from Raleigh the night of the 12th.
.
We left Smith field, N.C. front line about 12 o’clock and was marching and had to fall back on the 15th April 65.
.
We heard that Johnson was comeing.
.
Was Sarnscdeah (Surrendered) on that day.
.
Surrender Bennett’s House, Durham Station, N.C. April 26, 1865
... No records have been found to show exactly how many members of the Twenty-Third Georgia Infantry were still with the unit when it surrendered in late April, 1865. It is known , however, that Hoke’s Division was one of the largest in the Army of Tennessee and it is probable that as many as two hundred officers and enlisted men were still with the unit when it finally laid down its arms.
. <div><strong><font color=" #6600ff"="">April 1865
.
April 26th 1865 War Record of Samuel Tate Hammontree Co. E
Turned loose at Bentonville N.C. Rode, walked to Gainesville Ga., rode with Sam Tate (Henry Edwards with me), to Tate Ga., spent night with Tate, next day walked home
.
Pension claim of J C Boling Co. K 23rd Ga. Regt.
In person came J C Boling before me who on oath makes this statement = while negotiations for surrender were in progress at Raleigh N.C. we all rank and file knew we would be surrendered = and not knowing on what terms = Our officers told all who wanted to could go home = therefore fifteen of us came together = and when we got home we found all surrendered = and not knowing on what terms = wherefore we were compelled to go to Kingston Ga. for Parole = I surrendered my gun to Federal garrison at Blairsville Ga. before going to Kingston
.
Pension Application of JJ Cagle together with T R Rutherford, Enoch Walraven, Judge Avery and William Reece
left the army when it surrendered near Greenville, and did not go to Greensboro for a parole, but started home at once. Where we reached Cow Pens South Carolina, we were taken in charge by the 12 Ohio Cavalry, and were given a parole by them, after being detained about one hour. We then came home. We did not leave Johnstons army until after the surrender, it was twelve miles to Greensboro and we were in no condition to walk there and back again before starting home
.
Left the 17th of April 1865. Myself and 7 more of Co A 23rd Ga Regt left the regt on the 22nd of April 65 to go home and we came 9 miles the first night to New Salem and the 23rd of April we marched 30 miles the 24th we went 25 miles, the 25th we went 23 miles from New Salem to staker ferry is 41 miles, from staker ferry to Concord is 26 miles from Concord N.C. to hagers ferry on Canagia (Catawba) river is 25 miles and from the river to Linconton to Cherahill (Cherryville) N.C. is 10 miles.
.
We went 20 miles the 26th of April and the 27th we went 26 miles. Layson Ft is in the Yadkin Risua river in S.C. We went 24 miles the 28th. from Cheraville (Cheryville) N.C. to Shelly (Shelby), N.C. is 12 miles. From Shelly to Eallesis ferry is 10 miles, from Ellesis ferry N.C. to Cowpens Battleground is 13 miles, from the Battleground to Fingerville is 14 miles.
.
We travelled 24 miles the 29th of April 65. Went 25 miles the 30th day of April hit is 36 miles from Fingerville S.C. to Greenville, S.C.

May 1865
.
From Greenville, S.C. to Perkinville, S.C. is 13 miles. We went 21 miles the 1st day of May from Perkinville to Rendleton (Pendleton), S.C. is 16 miles. We went 30 miles the 2nd day of May from rendleton, S.C. to Marewill Bridge and Sinity (Seneca) River is 7 miles fro Mare well Bridge to Knasenis Bridge on Tougaloo is 13 miles from Knase Bridge to Gainsville, Ga is 16 miles.
.
We went 30 miles the 3rd day of May honier is the county. Best of Bounkins Country Ga We went 28 miles the 4th of May from Carnesville lake to Gainsville is 43 miles, from Gainsville to Browns Bridge is 9 miles.
.
We marched 25 miles the 5th day of May. We went 27 miles the 6th day of May from Browns Bridge to Canton is 35 miles.
.
S.G. Burdett got home and went out of the Army on the 7th day of May 1865.
.
April 22nd 1865.
.
Myself and 1st Liet W.M. Dunn 1st Sergt A.B. Shinall 2nd Sergt, J.W. Bently Tn in Co A 23rd Ga Regt. A Lentres 4th Sergt Joseph Culver, P.N. R. Cantrell P.M. Y Shan, P.N. Hetson left the 23rd Ga Regt with me. Belanyedtos (We left today?) on the 22nd day of April 1865 to come home and we got home on the 7th day of May 1865 on Sunday. S.G. Burdett
.
From New Salem to Stakes ferry N.C. is 41 miles from Staker ferry to Concord N.C. 26 miles from Concord to hagers ferry on the Canagia (Catawba) River 25 miles, from hagers ferry (Hagers Ferry about 1-mile upstream from Cowans Ford). to Lincantas (Lincolnton) N.C. is 17 miles, from Lincantas to Cheraville N.C. is 10 miles from Cheraville to Shelly, N.C. is 12 miles from Shelly to Ellisis to Campers (Cowpens) Battleground is 13 miles from the Battleground Battle Grove to fingerville is 14 miles from fingersville to Greenville, N.C. is 26 miles from Greenville N.C. to Pickenville is 13 miles from Pickenville to Pendleton is n16 miles Pendleton, S.C. to Maxwell Bridge is 7 miles from Maxwell Bridge to Knoxes Bridge is 13 miles, from Knoxes Bridge to Carnesville, Ga is 18 miles from Carnesville to Gainsville, Ga is 43 miles from Gainsville to Browns Bridge is 7 miles from Browns Bridge to Canton is 35 miles from Canton to Stomp Creek is 15 miles
.
May the 28th 1865
.
Distent I traved as I came home from the Army.
.
the 1st day I went 9 miles the night stive
the 2nd day 35 miles
the 3rd day 25 miles
the 4th day 23 miles
the 5th day 20
the 6th day 26
the 7th day 24
the 8th day 24
the 9th day 25
the 10th day 21
the 11th day 30
the 12th day 30
the 13th day 28
the 14th day 25
.
Distent I traveled as I came home from the Army basue hasne the 6th day of May 27 miles, the 7th day 21 miles
.

The men who contributed to this regimental history source are listed below:
.
Maj. William Barclay
Col. James Howard Huggins both were interviewed for a unit history while they were in the trenches at Petersburg, Va. in 1864
.
Samuel Tate Co. E,
.
Thomas P. Forrester Co. E, Roll for Feb 1864 shows present, no further record for him
.
D.S.A. Griffith Co. C, died June 15, 1862 of Typhoid Fever
.
Felix W. Isreal Co. K, was discharged July 22, 1864 by reason of being elected to Civil Service as a Tax Collector for Union County Ga.
.
Miller Collins Co. D, survived the war, but sounds as if he died not long after in a scuffle with union men at thier church
.
Robert E. Lawhon Co. F, survivrd the war, had his right leg amputated 3 inches above the knee from a wound he recieved from a shell on while on Morris Island
.
William Thomas Co. C, died Aug 19, 1864
.
Step Roberts Co. I,
.
Hiram S. Fuller Co. H, survived the war, died Sept 14, 1926 at Hot Springs, Ark
.
Capt. R. M Mitchell Co. C
.
John Barnes Co. B, deserted Jan 1, 1864
.
G.W. Hunnicutt Co. G, shot in left arm by Minie Ball, he was furloughed for 30 days starting June 18, 1864, no further record
.
William H. Smith Co. I
.
Samuel G Burdette Co. A was born Feb 2 1841 in South Carolina, he married twice, first wife was named Sarah, to this marriage he had several children, most of which are listed below in the 1880 census. His second wife was Caroline Kay, born March 1850 South Carolina. born March 1850 South Carolina. I believe sometime after this marriage he moved to Lumberton, Lamar County, Mississippi. He was a Blacksmith by trade, and retired there in Lumberton.
He died Sept 1st 1925 and is resting in City Cemetery, Lumberton, Mississippi
.