23rd Georgia Infantry

Letters of Thomas P Forrester Co. E

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Thomas p. Forrester was a private in Company E, during his service he wrote a substantial collection of letters below;

Camp McDonald
.
Oct the 3rd 1861
.
Dear Sister
.
I received yesterday by the hand of Mrs. Glenn a letter fro Father + Mother also one enclosed from you I was I was much pleased to see that you had taken up sufficient to write a letter to Mo. and I hope you will improve every opportunity of writing to me. it affords me much pleasure to see a line from your own hand
Well I am in good health and have been since I left home and I hope these lines may find you and all well. Mrs. Glenn informed me that mother was rather unwell but I hope to hear of her being well soon again
We have some three cases of measles in our company and several in the Regiment no other sickness of consequence. We have no notice as to the time we will be ordered we will be ordered away from here I think we will remain here perhaps three or four weeks longer we have as yet received no arms
you say you and the other children want to see me. I do not doubt this I know I know I have sister that love me and be assured I would be glad to see you all every week but I dont know whether I will get to come up again or not I shall come if I can get off, I will say to Mother and Father in relation to my clothes, that if I dont get to come up I will write in time and instruct them what to do with them and how to send them if they cant bring them. I must say to that by to days paper we learn that General Jackson with 2500 Georgians whipped and completely routed 5000 Lincolnites the other day at Cheat Mountain and further that Gov Brown of Georgia on Wednesday last completely routed the kid gloved office hunters of Ga by some 5-or 10,000 majority, so we feel that Ga is all right for two years longer excuse me for touching this question to you. and write soon again tell Betty to write and give my love to father mother and the children and receive a due portion to yourself also remember me to my many friends in the valley, come down if you can. I will write again before long
your affectionate
brother Tom
.
.
.

Camp McDonald
.
November the 13th 1861
.
Dear Sister
.
I take my hand this morning to drop you a few lines for the last time at present from Big Shanty, I can say to you I am well and have been since I left home and I hope these few lines may find you all favored with a like blessing. Bud is well and the rest of the company. Well Polly we now have our provision boxed up our clothes packed and ready to march to the Rail Road to take the train for Richmond. And wer’e these lines reaches you we will be getting on towards Richmond, The boys are all very anxious to get off and I hope we may have good weather, as the appearances are favorable at this time and I am really anxiuos to get off myself as we are doing no good here, And we will get Arms in Richmond and then I am ready to try the enemy of our country if necessary and though I and many others good and faithful soldiers may fall by their hands I think that through the interposition of Providence we will have success I will write as soon as we get to Richmond or wherever we may be stationed give my love to Father + Mother. Betty Ell and John and receive the same to yourself and receive the same for yourself and may the blessing of Heaven rest upon you all, also my kind regards to Mr. Stearns Esqr Watson and families = and I will close so good bye for the present
.
As Ever your absent
Brother = Tom P.
.
.
.

Yorktown Va
.
March the 24th 1862
.
Dear Sister
. I seat myself this evening to drop you a few lines which leaves me in reasonable health; not as well as I have been though nothing seriously ails me, I hope these lines may find you in good health with all the rest of the family and friends, as to my health it has been very good up to yesterday, when the yellow Jaundice made its appearance on me; it is by no means a dangerous complaint, but it makes a person feel very mean and give them the “blues” for a week or ten days; We have a good deal of sickness in Camps at present, some 20 of our company are sick and have been sent to the Hospital in consequence of an expected fight here, but it has not come off yet nor do I think it will soon; Capt Loveless is sick and gone to the Hospital. W.H. Steel died a few days ago. as probably you will hear before this reaches you . The Capt could not get to send him home in consequence of an order from Gen Magruder allowing no person to leave here at present, it will not be long in my opinion ; We have no war news to write you none more than what you hear in Georgia I have learned through letters from home that you have gone to live with Mrs. Reeves, I have no doubt you are at a very good place, and with a very clever lady. I hope you may be well satisfied and you and her get along agreeably, There is though a decided difference in living at home and living abroad, but I am satisfied of you having a mind to conduct yourself right and that you and Mrs. Reeves may be an advantage to each other, Wm Reeves is rather unwell, but not seriously ill; Mr. Edwards has been unwell since he came back, but is getting better, I do not know when I shall be home, as no furloughs are being given at present, but so soon as I can get a furlough, and can consistently come I will do so, I would be very glad to see you all, it seems a great while to me since I took my leave of you all for “Big Shanty”. But I am not alone by many thousands; many have left the home their pleasant firesides and loved ones behind; And gone to the Tented field to do service for thier country, not knowing whether they should ever return again or not; I yet have the unshaken confidence, that Providence will permit me to return. This I think to be the only arm to be busted in
I have had no letter from home since Mr. Edwards boxes come to hand; I write every week, but probably my letters do not reach thier destination, I shall to continue to write once a week home and will to you as often as I can. perhaps once in every two weeks; you write when you can I will be glad to hear from you any time, I send you enclosed five dollars, $5.00, to use as you may wish. I have nothing more to write that will interest you. I will close for the present
.
I am as ever your
affectionate and
absent brother
Thomas P. Forrester
.
P.S. Excuse me for frankling my Letter
as I have no stamps
T.P.F.
.
.
.

Yorktown Va
April 15th 1862
.
Dear Sister
your kind letter of the 5th Inst was received to day, which found me in good health; I was indeed glad to receive a letter from you, and to hear that you was well, further I was glad to hear you had returned home, I was not much in favor of you remaining away from home, although I said nothing against it, home it matters not what kind of a home it is very different from any other place or always was with me; I wrote home yesterday in answer to a letter I received from Mother, I give all the news of interest, nothing has taken place since, only the firing of a few Cannon by the yankees at us, but without doing any injury, I cant tell when the battle will come on, but certainly before many days, I wrote yesterday that Joe Wooten and Dolph Morrison had been over to see us. I hope have looking for Alf and Tom to day but they havent come yet, I have had no chance to go to see them; Count I believe the boys said was at Richmond soo all the rest of them are hear, I intend to try to see them all before many days, Also cousin Luther, Payton Ivie Benson and all the Grant and Ivie boys are here, I have not yet seen them, Capt Loveless is yet in the Hospital but is mending some also Sgt Williams Burton, Quinton, Siloam Goode Joe Taylor Ike Hazelwood and Ben are all in the Hospital, Some in camps are grunting mostly, with the Bomb fever The Boys have learned how to dodge very well since the Yankees have been firing at us, We watch the flash of the Cannon when they fire and every man drops behind the breastworks till the balls pass when we rise and watch again, they whistle very close to our heads some times, but none of us have been hurt yet, and I hope we may not if I should live to get through this fight, I shall try to come home in the course of two or three months I would be very glad to see you and the rest of the children, I often think of you all and ask myself the question shall I be permitted to see them all again, I hope I may, say to Miss Amanda West, that I was very glad to hear one word from her and if I could see her I could tell many a dismal tale of camp Life, and that I hope to have the pleasure of seeing her again, tell her Lieut P.F. is right side up, and getting on finely, also give my respects to Miss Hewet, tell her I hope to have an acquaintance with her, give my respects to Esqu. Watsons Girls, tell them I will write to them when the fight is over, also my regards to Abr Stearns + family, and all my friends that may enquire, give my love to Father + Mother also to the children and accept the same to yourself, write whenever you can.
.
Your affectionate Brother
Thomas P. Forrester
P.S. I must say that all is well
.
.
.

Yorktown Va
.
April 24th 1862
.
Dear Sister
.
I avail myself of a leisure moment to write a few lines which leaves me well and I hope may find you all equally blessed. I have no news of interest to write you.
The great fight here has not yet come off, though the enemy is yet lieing around here; Some are of the opinion there will yet be no fight I cannot tell about this, they have been here long enough to have had several fights if they were very anxious, there may yet be a fight but I have some doubts about it, yesterday I saw Thomas Stearns, this morning I saw Alf. I was so glad to see them, they look just like Tom and Alf yet, they are both well, I see some them nearly every day
Well I send you a small bunch of Toms hair, I had to cut it out with my knife, and it hurt so bad I could not cut out any more. I will try to bring it all home and let you cut some out, it is tolerably short and very dirty, I havnt time to write much and havnt much to write, write when you can, tell Betty Ell and John I havnt forgot them, that I want to see them very bad. give my love to father + Mother also to the children and accept to yourself the
best wishes and love of an absent Brother
.
Tom
P.S. I will write again in
a few days
.
.
.

Richmond Va
.
Thursday Evening 22nd May 1862
.
Dear Sister
.
I have just been Town Brought Bought some paper pen and ink, and have one hour till supper and think I could not devote my time more pleasantly than in writing to a kind Sister, I am glad to say to you that I am again good health, think I will go to the Regiment to morrow, perhaps I may not go to till Saturday Lieut Ferguson is here with me very unwell if he does not get better
Tomorrow I shall not go till Saturday, I hope these lines may find you all favored with good health which certainly is a great blessing, I have nothing like news to write you, our army around Richmond is lying very still, and I hear but little of the Yankees in the last few days, I suppose they are slipping around trying to sneak in some place that we are not watching, as the bell has rung for supper I must stop for the night as it is getting to dark to write now, I will finish in the morning, so good night
.
Friday Morning 23rd May
Another sun has rose bright and clear, I am well Lieut Ferguson is better, By the way of news I must tell you that I saw Wm P. Ivie yesterday also Benson and James Kimbrel they are all here on the sick list though not dangerous. James Kimbrel has his fore and middle finger on his right hand shot off Just below the first Joint done accidentally by himself, its healing very well. he will get a discharge when it gets so he can travel with it, Benson talked a great deal about you all was very proud to see me, and says tell Uncle Hiram he wants to see him very bad, and wants the war to end. Pate looks pretty healthy, he has been at the Hospital a week or two, his wife is dead she died in April, John C Grant is dead he died at Petersburg Va of fever some weeks ago and was buried there, also Joe Fields is dead and buried here at Richmond, the rest of the boys are all well and with their Regiments I heard from Luther but have not seen him, he is with his regiment and is well, In my other letters I forgot to mention that I had received a letter from Aunt Sarah and one from Aunt Betty, just before we left Yorktown, they were generally all well, Elijah Echols is dead, he died in Febr or March, they requested me when I wrote home to give their love to you all I have not had time to write to them yet I will write before long, There is a great deal of talk about Richmond now some are of the opinion that a great fight will come on here soon, while others think that Richmond and even all Virginia will be entirely evacuated by our forces for a while and leave it at the mercy of the Yankees, This I hope will not be done, I have no idea it will not do I think there will any fight soon I think if any movement is being made by the Enemy it will be to try to cut off our supplies and starve us out, but I have no fears of their success in this, There is no opinion as to peace being made, when we whip them, then we will have peace and not before, As to a furlough there is none being given now, dont expect there will be soon, I would be glad to see you all, be glad to at home and stay if we could have peace, If there is a chance I would like to come home in July or August during the very hot weather and stay three or four weeks, but I am of the opinion chances will be bad during this year. I want you to write soon and give me all the news you know, tell Mary, Margaret and Jane I would be glad to see them and for them to write, my chances are going to be very bad for writing when I go to camps again for we have no tent nor nothing else only Just what we pick up and carry when ever we are ordered to march, I me a blanket yesterday and carpet sack, am going to carry one suit in it one on my back and that is all I want ata time, Tell Betty, Ell, and John, I want to see them very bad and if I live I will come home some day, give my love to Father and Mother also the children and accept a great portion for yourself. give my kind regards to Mr Watson and family, also Mr Stearns and family, and those that may enquire after me write soon
.
your affectionate Brother,
Tom
Direct to
Richmond Va
Co. E.
23rd Ga Regt
.
.
.

Camp near Richmond
.
Sunday Evening 20th July 1862
.
Dear Sister
I seat myself this Evening to drop you a few lines, which leaves me unwell, but some better than when I wrote to Father + Mother, I hope this may find you in good health, and all the rest of the family for surely good health is an inestimable blessing
I have no news to write you, only to tell you that Dr A.H. Stearns has Just, He has been over all evening he is in very good health I was very glad to see him as I had not him since we left Yorktown and then he looks so much like Alf, It makes me think of home to be with him. Samuel Allred come over with he is well too and in fine spirits, I have got off to a private house yet nor dont know that I can, If I dont probably I will get able for duty in Camps before long, I am still going, but feel very week in my knees and hips, If I get off to a private house I will let you know, I have received no letter from home since date 22nd June, none from you since I wrote to you before, I am looking for two or three every mail, As I have no news to write I will close for the present; give my love to all accept a due share to yourself, write when you can .
Excuse my short letter for this time
.
Your affectionate
.
Brother Tom
.
.
.

Camp Near Frederick City Maryland
Sept the 7th 1862
Dear Sister.
.
You be some what surprised to hear from me in Maryland, but we are here. Our Brigade crossed the Potomac night before last I crossed yesterday morning with the waggons being in charge of them. Part of our forces have advanced 16 or 20 miles into the state. Gen Jacksons army is at or beyond Frederick City some 4 or 5 miles from here we are 10 or 12 miles from the River. I suppose that we now 250,000, two hundred and fifty thousand men across the River. We have met with no opposition yet but have had some accessions to our forces, some 4 or 5 Companies are said to have Joined us since we crossed and that more are comeing, this is a beautiful country, the finest I ever saw and the people generally received us very cordially.
Everything is quite cheap here. Bacon 12 c pr lbs, flour 31/2 c pr lbs Butter 10 c Molasses 40 to 60 c pr gallon good shoes $2.00 pr pair Boots $4.00 to $5,00, and before I forget it say to Father that I have a pair of Boots, have swapped my old shoes for them, that will do me till Christmas and for him not to have any made if he has not, clothing too is cheap if I can get to it before its all sold, and besides that they take Confederate money here freely with some few Exceptions, the weather is very fine now though rather warm, I am in good health so most of the Company I regret very much to say that Capt Loveless. Lieuts. Ferguson and Kelly are all behind sick.
I am detailed with the waggons so that our Co. has no officers of thier own, though one is appointed to take charge of them, to day is sunday and we are resting the first rest we have had in two weeks, we will move on in the morning. I dont know what direction we will go but I suppose toward Baltimore at least I hope so, I dont know when I will have a chance to send my letter back to Orange, as we have no mail from there only as waggons passes and it is 70 or 80 miles. I will write as often as often as I can and send them the same way. I hope we will have a mail soon. as we have had no letters since we Orange, I have nothing more of interest to write, the troops are all in fine spirits; and stand the marches finely
Tell Mary + Margaret I forgot that I am due them a letter, tell them I will write as soon as possible, you must not git out of patience waiting for letters I have wrote two before this since we left Orange City, write and direct to Richmond give my best love to father and Mother also to the Children accept a due portion and write soon to
.
your absent
.
brother Tom
.
.
.

Camp Below Fredericksburg Va
.
Dec 19th 1862
.
Dear Sister,
.
I seat myself this Evening to write a few lines, which leaves me in good health, and I hope may find you all favored with like blessing. Well as you have perhaps learned before this reaches that the Yankees have again been beaten by the Rebels; I know you have all been very anxious to hear the results of this great fight, as all Expected it would certainly come on; One hard days fighting was however done though our Division was not engaged; notwithstanding they were on the front line
Monday Morning the 15th just when a general attack was Expected to be made. At day light it was found that the yankees had all or nearly all crossed over the River; that they did not intend to give us battle here; our regiment was ready the boys were all at their posts; and had determined to meet the enemy boldly I know they would have done i; But when it was found that the enemy had give back; a thrill of Joy seemed to run through every heart; and a yell such as I hardly ever heard ran through of our noble and gallant army upon the reception of the news: I am confident if they had fought us, we Should have whipped desperately; but would necessarily have lost many good men; as it is we have a Complete victory over them, but I hear this evening that they are again crossing the River and we doubtless may have to meet them again, if we do I am satisfied we shall give them a good brushing; Well I must tell you that I put on my new pants this morning; they fit me splendid; but I hate to wear them in rainy weather to muddy them; yesterday I received a letter of from E.P. Price; He is at Frederick Maryland, doing very well, and says he will be to see us in a few weeks. I hope he may I am so proud to hear he is alive; although I had written Mrs? Price he was dead, I shall write her or Miss Low to day, to day I received a letter to day from Aunt Sarah, which I enclose to you read to all, she seems to think a great deal of me; I surely love her as much as any of my Aunts, if not more, I shall write her to morrow.
James Roach to day received his discharge will start home day after tomorrow; Well Pollie, Christmas will soon be hear again and I shall not be at home; how much I should like to be their a few weeks; I know I could not be Contented long; but so it is I ask a Christmas gift of you; and will come home as soon as I can and get it, I hope the war may end by spring at farthest, but I fear it will not end that soon.
Tell Mary and Margaret to think hard of me I will write them very soon that hardly write any where only home, give them my Respects;
the other day I saw all the valley boys again I was very glad to see them Mr. Stearns was out there, but as it was dark and he was back with the waggons I did not get to see him, I wanted to see him very bad
Tell the children I should be glad to see them all and for them to write when they can I am always glad to hear from home. tell Father and Mother I will write them before long; Tell Mrs Glenn, when I heard that Lieut Glenn was gone home, I divided his butter with James Roach; and intend giving him half Malinda’s apples and shall eat the others myself; The boys are generally in very good health and doing finely
give my love to Father Mother and the children;
accept a due portion to yourself write soon
.
your afft Brother
Tom
Direct to Richmond Colquitts Brigade
DH Hills Div Va
.
.
.

Camp near Fredericksburg Va
.
February The 22nd 1863
.
Dear Sister.
.
As I am closely housed up to day by a severe snow storm, which has been raging since early last night. The snow is now some 18 inches deep and yet snowing with a fair prospect of it continueing this evening and to night, I shall not be surprised if it falls to the depth of two feet or more. as the citizens say it is frequently 2+ 3 feet deep in the winter. The weather is not as cold as one would think it to be, or else we have become accustomed to it more than we used to be, we are all tolerably well fixed up now, at least most all have tents or little pole houses, I have a good Tent, and chimney to it for myself and Quarter Master Sergeant we also have a bed stead made of poles plenty of Blankets and are living very well. I had expected to been with the Company before now, but have again been detailed, and it will probably be some time in March or April before I am relieved again.
As I could not get off home, I have no objections to remaining on duty in the quarter Master department till the winter is over, as I can take care of myself much better, There has several heavy snows within the last six weeks more snows and much deeper than I ever saw in Ga.
There has not been so much rain as was last winter but it has been a much colder winter so if there is any sign in a cold winter, I think we will have a good crop year, at least I hope so. Well Pollie I reckon you have all been very lonesome since Father died, I should like to have come to see you while you were so much alone, but I could not get off. I shall Come Just as soon as I can. I think there will be some chances for me when Lieut Ferguson and Kelly both get back if there is no fight expected. The Yankees are now near all gone from hear some gone to Washington City, and others to Suffolk below Richmond, I do hope they will remain quiet another month as the weather is so bad to think of marching now. The boys are generally all well in the Company, Capt Loveless is well and speaks of resigning and going home. Jessee Berry is well and hearty also tell Bettie Drew is well and has been Cooking for me a week or two.
I suppose before this you have received my letter by mail to Mother, in that I advised Mother as to what, she had better do, I hope you will all get a long well and do the best you can. tell the children to be agreeable with each other, and to lose no time when the weather is good, tell Mother if she thinks it best and can sell one of the horses, perhaps it would be as well, but to Exercise her own feelings about that, Tell Margaret her letter is received, I will answer it in a few days. I have no news of interest to write.
My health is very good, and I hope this may find you all favored with the same blessing, give my love to Mother, Bettie, Ell, and John, accept a due portion to yourself, I received a letter from Mr. Luter a day or two ago, written at the request of Mother, the only news from you in some time. write soon.
.
As ever your Brother.
Tom
.
.
.

Camp 23rd Ga Regt
.
April 2nd 1863
.
Miss Mary Forrester
Kind Sister,
Your Letter of the 21st March was received Yesterday, I was very glad to have a letter from you, as had not had one since Bud came in, and I was getting very anxious to hear from home, this leaves me in good health and I hope may find you all favored with a like blessing, I have no news of interest to write you only to say that everything is yet quiet along the lines of the Rappahannock, and I wish them to remain so, I have another pack I will send home if I have a chance. It has been such bad weather you have not had an opportunity to do much work at least it has been so hear.
I hope you may get another hand to help you soon. Betty and John cant plow very well with the large plow Before this reaches you Squire Kelly and E.P. Price will have got home, go up and see Eroc, he can tell you all the news, and about your Tom too, I am sorry for Eroc because he is so badly crippled, now a word about your Tom and others, I like Tom very well but I always thought very well of Joe and do yet. I must tell you I think more of him than of Tom, though I have nothing whatever against Tom, but I think Joe much the best young man as there is no harm in corresponding with a credible young man now especially if you were acquainted with when at home, I have several lady correspondents, very nice ones, I will tell you all about it, should I ever to be so fortunate as to get home.
I am becoming very impatient for the war to end, I want to see some of the Girls, I want to wear one more starched shirt, Black my boots, and go to meeting again like I used to, the 27th of March, being fast day we had preaching in Camps, had a very good sermon, I didnt fast any more than usual, though I perhaps ought to have done it, and I know I ought to have prayed, you asked me if I think you improve any in writing, I think you do I can read all your letters very well the only objection I have is that I dont get enough of them, I guess it puzzles you to read some of mine, and this one of them, I dont always have time to write as good as I wish to.
I have been relieved as acting Quarter Master, but am on ____ other detail as Commissary of the Regiment it is now seven months since I have done any duty in the Company and I suppose will be two months longer yet The boys grumble about it but I am doing very well, and Col Best detailed me to act and no one can object to it properly, Col Best is a good friend of mine and I shall endeavor to keep him so.
Say to Bettie to Drew is still cooking for me, Drew is a very good boy, always does anything I ask him to. I have no more that will interest you as I know of at present, you mentioned in your last letter about me going to Capt. Steels Company there has been such talk, but I shall not go now. Capt Steel will hardly resign as he would be conscripted immediately, Capt. Loveless will resign and go home soon I think I shall then have as good a position as I want in the army that of 1st Lieut, do you hear or see anything of my “deary nowadays, I should be very glad to see her write again soon give my love to Mother and the other children accept a due portion to yourself;
.
your affetate – Brother
.
.
. Tom
.
.
.

Camp on James Island
.
near Charleston, Aug 15th 1863
.
Miss M.T. Forrester,
My Dear Sister
You no doubt think I have not received your Letter or that I am negligent in writing to you. your kind letter of the 19th July was received before we left Wilmington, but having some other letters to answer to some of my friends, I laid yours over for a day or two; as I had Just written to Mother, and was ordered from Wilmington in a few days. I have only written home once from here, that to Mother. I now respond to your letter. I have no news to write you from Charleston all is quiet heir, Except occasional Cannonading which may be heard at intervals during the day and night. But little damage I think is being done by either party at this time. our people are still making every improvement and preparations that is thought necessary to defeat the Enemy again while they no doubt are doing the same, my opinion now is that we shall be able to meet, and successfully defeat any force the enemy may bring against the City. I learn that some 25 or 30 Gunboats are lieing off around Morris Island. Forts Sumpter and Moultrie, they are very formidable looking monsters, and can throw shell a great distance, our Battery on Morris Island holds out yet, and is now said to be stronger than when the siege Commenced. An attack may be made at any day. our people and soldiers are all in good spirits and Confident of success here. The health of our Regiment is as good as at any time since we left Virginia. Some few in the Company Complaining, none seriously ill, myself and mess are all well. The weather has been very hot since we have been here, but is more pleasant now, a light rain haveing fell to day, water is not good we get our drinking water from a pump, about one mile from Camps, which is very fair water, our rations are not so good here, as we have been accustomed to, We get Beef instead of Bacon. Rice sometimes instead of flour or meal. The boys charge when they get rice in place of flour or meal We get no flour here, and not much Bacon, But I think we can stand that for the length of time we shall remain here. as I dont think we will stay here longer than the present siege last. Then we calculate going to Georgia Curling, if the Yankees invade Georgia we want to meet them there. I hope they may never get there, but from all indications, now I very much fear they will. The Vicksburg boys I learn are all at home. I guess they are haveing a good time I am glad that some soldiers can get home. I fear however though they will not get back soon. I wish so much that some of the boys in the 20th Ga could get a furlough, they have been gone so long. besides this, they have done a great deal of hard service and some of them deserve a furlough
What was the matter with Uncle Willis and Mother about the wheat ? Did they have any differences about it ?
I hope not, I think myself he charges pretty high but I have always looked upon Uncle Willis as a man that was disposed to do what was right. He perhaps thought it was not too much. I hope there will be no feelings about it, as he has been good friend to me, and to you all. and I have no doubt will be again if you should call on him you said you had been down Emelissa, didnt get any beer you say. I shall want some when I come home and go down. I have written her a letter since I came back. hope to hear from her in a few days. I am writing to some of my lady friends that I have never written to before. Dont Expect that they will all write back. They need not if they dont want to. I wrote Margaret before we left Wilmington, am looking for a letter from her. I shall not neglect writing home in consequence of my Lady Correspondents you spoke of going to Antioch to preaching. I should liked to very much to have been there, you thought maybe you would see my deary there; Did you see her? If so did she speak to you, or you to her? I have received no letter from her since I returned of Course I have written to her. not often though. I have heard that some of the Girls were displeased in the manner I treated them about the fishing party, those are the ones I have written to simply to give them satisfaction and to satisfy myself, I am yet satisfied that I did right, and I should do so again under the same circumstances, I hope you have got all your wheat out, and your Corn done and that you are now resting.
Since I have returned to the army I have thought a great deal about becomeing a Candidate. I dont know what to do about it, I know I ought to be at home, and I believe my friends are willing that I should be at home, but I have not yet got my own Consent to leave my friends here, the boys with whom I have been for two long years so closely allied, Boys who have borne hardships, toils, and privations by my side, men who would stand up and die with me upon the Battle field if necessary, It would indeed be a trial for me. I will consider the matter in all its bearings, Its a good while yet. If I should be spared till the time I may Conclude to come, I will write you again about it, Lest I Weary you with too long a letter I will hasten to a Close.
Write me all the news when you have an oppertunity, I will write some of you in a few days again, My love to Mother , and the children. receive a large share to yourself, Direct to Charleston, S.C.
your affectionate Brother. T.P.F.
what about the male Do you get letters at Sanderstown yet and what days
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Camp on James Island
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Sabbath Sept 6th 1863
Miss M.T. Forrester
Dear Sister
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you letter of the 29th August, to hand, I was truly glad to hear you and all the rest were well. These lines leaves me in good health, though some what reduced by the chills, I think I will soon regain my lost flesh. Some sickness in the company, at least several complaining. Capt Ferguson has had two very severe attack of Colie or Cholera morbis; one last night, that was very bad for two or three hours this morning he is much better. Jessa Berry, Pat Hood and several others are well, we cant have good health here, The mulesles bad; Well the Bombardment still continues. yesterday the gun boats, mortars and Land batteries of the enemy kept up a furious fire up on our works at Battery Wagner, also last night, and Considerable fireing is going on this morning; Battery Wagner and Fort Sumter yet hold out, but they surely cant stand much if the Yankees continue to bombard them. When these places fall then comes the last for Charleston. ____ _____ to give the Yankees some trouble then, before they get it The Yankees comm and did demand they surrender Battery Wagner and Fort Sumter, and threatened to Shell the City if they were that surrounded. Gen Beauregard informed him by should not surrender them to him. Some few shells were thrown in the city but very little damage was done. It is unknown how the _____ may terminate, I think we will be able to hold Charleston for several months yet and perhaps never lose it. The Yankees are making a desperate effort to take it, while we are doing the same to save it. You have bad in all the special letters I write you, Though there was nothing very special in the last one I wrote. I am glad to hear that Bud mending, I hope he may soon get well.
I am sorry to hear the people are so much out of heart in Pickens. They must cheer up. I must close soon, my love to the Children and Mother, yourself not forgotten .
Excuse my very bad paper and written letter. If you cant read it send it back and I will write another.
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write when convenient to your Brother Tom
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Camp on James Island S.C.
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Nov 6th 1863
Miss M.T. Forrester
Dear Sister.
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We have Just returned from a three days tour of Picket duty, some two miles from our Camp: The Picket line, runs in the direction of Stono River and is the South Boundary of James Island. The Yankees may be seen at some points of the line, Their drums have been heard very distinctly for several Morning and Evenings until this morning no drums could be hear: and the impression is that they may be leaving here. I hope it may prove to be true. If they Should abandoned the Siege of Charleston and we got to remain here: We Expect to have fine times; as the Boys are nearly done their winter quarters. Most of them have split log Cabbins Covered with new Pine Boards + Brick Chimneys. Our mess have not Commenced building yet.
We will Commence next week. The weather is fine and warm almost like summer. Capt Ferguson is at Fort Sumter yet with 5 men from our Company. 43 from the Regiment. The bombardment for the last two days and nights has been very heavy.
I received a telegraphic dispatch from Capt Ferguson saying he and the men from our Regt were all safe, and in fine spirits. I hope he may come out safe. If the siege Continues we will all have to take a tour of duty in the old strong hold. Charleston in my opinion is yet safe. Stirring times at Chattanooga now; dont want to go there. Mr Moss and Mr Corbin, are both in Camps now.
They speak of leaving tomorrow Be sure and send my Books by first safe hands. I have nothing more of interest to write. My health is very good now. Boys generally well. Capt Glenn well. My love to Mother the Children and yourself.
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write me soon.
Your affectionate Brother
Tom
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Camp 23rd Ga Regt
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Nov 28th 1863
Miss M.T. Forrester
My Dear Sister
Your kind letter of 22nd Just received last Evening. glad to hear from you all + to hear you were doing so well. This leaves me in good health. I have not time to write you a long letter as we go on Picket this morning
(Saturday, I am not Compelled to go but Lieut Pool is gone home + Lieut Worley gone to Fort Sumter so I shall go with Pack and stay till to morrow evening Monday I have to attend a Court Martial. Have no news of interest to write. you surely do not get my letters. I write to some of you twice a week. Have written you one or two letters.
Will write again in a few days.
My love to Mother + the Children accept to yourself a due portion
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Your Brother
T.P. Forrester
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Camp at Baldwin Fla. March 14th 1864
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Miss M.T. Forrester
Dear Sister,
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I wrote Mother a few days since, by Mr Glenn. I do not expect he has gone yet, as a portion of the Rail Road between Lake City and Madison has been washed away. There is nothing new to write you. Every thing continues to be quiet in front. Dont hear anything from the Yankees reliable. We have here several days working on fortifications. We expect to return to the Brigade soon.
Their Camp is six or seven moles from here. Seven deserted from Capt Glenn’s Company one night last week. Seven men from our Company three nights ago. two of the Crows, two Corbins one Neil + John Agan + Jessee Cox.
Efforts are being made to catch them. I hope they will be caught and an example made of them by shooting.
Weather is very nice now, only days are very warm for the season. I have not got the rings made yet. have no more to write now that will interest you.
My love to Mother, the Children and yourself. Write me soon.
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As ever your
Brother.
T.P. Forrester
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Excuse my stamp
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March 15th 1864
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Capt Ferguson left yesterday for Ga on business, will no doubt reach home before you receive this. He will carry his trunk home and some things of mine. My old Blue Pants, My Yankee shirt. a woolen home made shirt, two or three pairs socks, the socks are marked. also my “Spectacles” and Ball of Wool Yarn. Please to send that back. go down and get the other things, wash my old pants and send them back, keep the shirts. Capt is gone to try to catch those deserters. I will write if I think of any other things I want
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your Brother
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Tom
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Camp Milton Fla
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April 6th 1864
Miss M.T. Forrester,
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Dear Sister,
Your letter of the 24th March I received several days ago; but as I had a pass for three days to go to Gainesville Fla. I concluded not to write you till I returned. I have Just got in. Gainesville is 60 miles from here due south and is a very nice Town, The most pleasant place I have seen in Florida. I enjoyed my trip pretty well saw some nice young Ladies. Had an introduction to them, heard them perform on the Piano, saw lots of flowers, and above all had a Turkey for dinner yesterday at the Hotel.
Plenty of Oranges at 20 cts per piece I eat several, wish you all had
I am very much pleased with some portions of Florida, Expect I shall want to move down here when the war is over, if I shall live that long. Cousin Henry Meeks lives about forty miles from Gainesville, He works in a waggon shop in Gainesville, but was gone home when I got there. I saw his son Henry. He is 17 years of age. Just a Meeks.
Henry had gone home to work over his corn. Since I have been gone the 6th Ga Regiment had a skirmish with the Yankees and a general fight was expected, but I believe it has all passed off without a fight; at least all is quiet now. The order for furloughs has been Countermanded for the present. Bud is in good health and the boys generally.
My health Continues very good., except Cold, I bought a good pair of shoes at Gainesville or had them made as mine were worn considerably and shoes are very hard to get here. I paid thirty (30) Dollars and got a good pair of shoes. Cheap as they can be bought any where. I hope the weather will soon moderate in the Mountains so you can work as it will very soon be planting time. I believe I have written all that will interest you. will write soon again. My love to Mother and the Children a large portion to yourself.
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write when Convenient
Your Brother,
Tom
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. P.S. No Stamps yet

Camp Milton Fla
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April 14th 1864
Miss M.T. Forrester,
Dear Sister,
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Because I have not written you since I returned to the Regiment, you must think that I have forgotten you. No by no means. I have wrote the greater portion of my letters to Mother I believe one or two to Polly one to John, so I think I am due you one, also Ell. I have nothing new to write you. Everything remains quiet on the front lines, Yankee deserters are comeing in almost every day, two came in yesterday. Last night our Regiment received orders to cook three days rations and be ready to move at moments notice. The rations are Cooked and every one ready. Dont know when it is to go, nor whether we will go or not such orders are not uncommon in the army. If we move I will write you soon again.
Say to Mother I received her letter of the 5th Inst. on yesterday, glad to hear from home again. you are having a long cold winter in the Mountains. Has been pleasant nearly all the time since we came down here, No snow, frost nor nothing of the kind. Bud is in very good health and the boys generally, I am expecting to have chills this spring again have already had light, Came near having another on yesterday, today I feel very well. To morrow is chill day again, If I have them bad I shall try to get a furlough, I should like to have the furlough but am not willing to have the chills right bad for a furlough. I hope the weather has moderated so you can commence planting before this time. I am glad to learn that Capt Glenn is doing well . Hope he may be sufficiently recovered to rejoin his Command. Shall expect Capt Ferguson in ten or fifteen days. Say to Ell I will write her before long. shall expect to hear from you very soon. My love to Mother Pollie Ell and John, My regards to my friends that may enquire.
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Write soon very soon
your affct Brother
Tom
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No Stamps
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